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10 Tips To Eat Well With Diabetes

10 Tips To Eat Well With Diabetes

Be picky. Choose the right foods to keep your diabetes in check. And try to cook at home instead of going out. It's easier to keep track of what you eat when you make your own meals. Use these ideas as motivation when you're whipping something up in the kitchen. Keep these tips in mind when you dine out, too. 1. Think Whole Use brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Look for 100% whole wheat flour and breads, and other whole grains like oats and barley. Make the switch simple. For instance, if you're short on time, pop a packet of pre-cooked frozen brown rice into the microwave. 2. Fill Up! Aim for at least 8 grams of fiber per meal, especially when you eat carbohydrate-rich foods. It will help manage your blood sugar, keep you feeling full, and be good for your heart health. That's extra important because diabetes makes heart disease more likely. Try: Peas Beans Oats Barley Fruits like apples, pears, berries, and citrus Vegetables like sweet potatoes, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, carrots, and beets 3. Replace Some Carbs With Good Fat Monounsaturated fats -- nuts, avocados, olive oil, and canola oil -- can help lower your blood sugar. Just avoid huge portions so you don't take in too many calories. Add nuts and avocado to salads and entrees. Look for salad dressings, marinades, and sauces made with canola or olive oil. You can also cook with these two oils. Good choices that aren't likely to cause a big rise in your levels include lean meat, poultry, fish, avocados, salad vegetables, eggs, and cheese. Add these items to your plate to help balance the foods you eat that have carbs. 5. Go Lean Choose recipes with less saturated fat. Maybe skip that cream sauce and look for lean cuts of meat, skim or low-fat dairy, and vegetable sources of protein like beans, lentils, or nuts. D Continue reading >>

Meal Plans And Diabetes

Meal Plans And Diabetes

en espaolLos planes de alimentacin y la diabetes Kids with diabetes benefit from a healthy diet the same as everyone else. Although kids with diabetes don't have to follow a special diabetes diet, they may need to pay more attention to when they eat and how much is on their plates. Meal planning goals for kids with diabetes often are the same as those for other kids: They need foods that help them have overall good health, normal growth , and a healthy weight . But kids with diabetes also have to balance their intake of carbohydrates (carbs)with their insulin and activity levels to keep blood sugar levels under control, and they should eat foods that help keep the levels of lipids (fats like cholesterol and triglycerides) in the blood in a healthy range. Doing socan help prevent some of the long-term health problems that diabetes can cause. Kids with diabetes face the same food challenges as everyone else mainly, sticking with healthy eating habits. You need to know what's in the foods you're serving and eating. It's easy to guess what some foods contain, but others are more of a challenge. So look to food labels to find a food's ingredients, nutritional information, and calories. Be sure tolook for information oncarbs, which can affect blood sugar levels. Usually, they're clearly listed on food labels in grams. The two main forms of carbs are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in fruit and some baked goods), glucose (the main sugar in our bodies that's also found in foods like cake, cookies, and soft drinks), and lactose (sugar found in milk and yogurt). Starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, rice, and cereals; and breads. The body breaks down or converts most carbs into glucose, which is absorbed into the bl Continue reading >>

The Blood Sugar Diet Review

The Blood Sugar Diet Review

The Blood Sugar Diet is a book by Dr. Michael Moseley. It promises to help you shed 10% to 15% of your body weight in just 8 weeks. Essentially, it's a very low calorie diet (VLCD) , with one huge difference: it uses real food. On most VLCD systems, you replace some or all of your meals with diet shakes or bars, which have one big drawback: they don't help you learn new eating habits. Once the diet is over, you go back to cooking the same old meals, with ingredients and/or portion sizes that are unhealthy, so you'll put the weight right back on. The Blood Sugar Diet is not only much tastier (because food always tastes better than synthetic shakes!), it also teaches you about healthy eating, so you'll know how to maintain your weight once you've reached your goal. Having spent hours Googling and finding forums full of people who have achieved and maintained the promised weight loss on the BSD, I was convinced. However, I know I'm not good at dieting. So I decided to sign up for an online version, which promised lots of help and support to stick to it. The group I joined was the 12-week Blood Sugar Diet Online (BSD Online). This is my detailed review. There's no question, the 8 Week Blood Sugar Diet is value for money - all you have to do is buy the book! But what about the online program? When I signed up, the fee was about $130 (99 pounds sterling), and I hesitated about the cost - but the longer duration made me feel I was getting better value. It works out at about $11 a week for 12 weeks, whereas it would be $16 a week for 8 weeks. Bargain! You can imagine how I felt, then, when I got my welcome email and discovered that "Week One" isn't week one at all! It's "orientation" week. In practice that meant a couple of handouts about weight loss and health, and advice to Continue reading >>

The Blood Sugar Diet: What 800 Calories Really Looks Like

The Blood Sugar Diet: What 800 Calories Really Looks Like

The Blood Sugar Diet: what 800 calories really looks like Its the stricter version of the 5:2 diet that can help lower blood sugar levels and could reverse type 2 diabetes. Involving eating 800 calories a day for 8 weeks, heres what three days of meal plans looks like High blood sugar levels - millions of us have it, but many of us dont know it and its led to not just a type 2 diabetes epidemic, but also a rise in prediabetes , the condition that precedes it. Could calorie restriction help? It worked for medical journalist, Dr Michael Mosley and in his book, The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet , he shares the science behind it. Inspired by Dr Mosleys own experiences as a type 2 diabetic (which he no longer is), the books aimed at helping those with diabetes, and those at high risk of developing it, lose belly fat and reduce and stabilise their blood sugar levels through modifications to their diet. A stricter version of the 5:2 diet , the first stage involves an intensive fasting period - an 800 calorie a day plan for eight weeks. However, unlike a soups-and-shakes type of diet as explored in the BBCs The Big Crash Diet Experiment , it involves eating more appetising (and interesting) real food based on the fundamentals of the Mediterranean diet . And while, he emphasises that individual medical guidance is key, and that no one diet will necessarily work for everyone, ( see his contraindications here ) the evidence that radical calorie restriction works is strong. What does a menu of 800 calories a day look like? Its more substantial than you think. Heres an insight into the weekday meal plans, including a weekend option which features a brunch recipe combined with a more substantial supper. Yoghurt with passion fruit and almonds - 170 calories Toast the flaked almonds in a dr Continue reading >>

What Is A Balanced Diet For Diabetes?

What Is A Balanced Diet For Diabetes?

What is a healthy , balanced diet for Diabetes ? From Diabetes UK Whether you are living with diabetes or not, eating well is important. The foods you choose to eat in your daily diet make a difference not only to managing diabetes , but also to how well you feel and how much energy you have every day. How much you need to eat and drink is based on your age, gender, how active you are and the goals you are looking to achieve. Portion sizes have grown in recent years, as the plates and bowls we use have got bigger. Use smaller crockery to cut back on your portion sizes, while making the food on your plate look bigger. No single food contains all the essential nutrients you need in the right proportion. Thats why you need to consume foods from each of the main food groups to eat well. Naturally low in fat and calories and packed full of vitamins, minerals and fibre, fruit and vegetables add flavour and variety to every meal. They may also help protect against stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers. Try: adding an extra handful of vegetables to your dishes when cooking peas to rice, spinach to lamb or onions to chicken. Potatoes, rice, pasta, bread, chapattis, naan and plantain all contain carbohydrate, which is broken down into glucose and used by your cells as fuel. Better options of starchy foods such as wholegrain bread, wholewheat pasta and basmati, brown or wild rice contain more fibre, which helps to keep your digestive system working well. They are generally more slowly absorbed (that is, they have a lower glycaemic index, or GI), keeping you feeling fuller for longer. Try: potatoes any way you like but dont fry them with the skin left on for valuable fibre. Milk, cheese and yogurt contain calcium, which is vital for growing children as it kee Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Recipes And Meal Ideas

Tetra Images/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images The food cravings and aversions of pregnancy often make meal planning and eating a bit more complicated, and gestational diabetes only adds to this complexity. When it comes to meal ideas and recipes, a woman with gestational diabetes needs tobe most mindful of carbohydrates, which is the nutrient that impacts blood sugars the most. Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes mellitus (also called "diabetes") that develops in women for the first time during pregnancy. Diabetes means that glucose (sugar) levels in a person's bloodstream are too high. Normally, the hormone insulin , which is produced by an organ called the pancreas, absorbs and uses glucose that comes from your food. During pregnancy, though, a woman's hormones make it difficult for her to use insulin (this is called insulin resistance). In other words, she has to use a lot more insulin, up to three times as much, to bring down glucose levels in the blood. In some pregnant women (around 9 percent, according to the American Diabetes Association) their body cannot make enough insulin to keep their glucose levels within the normal rangethis condition is called gestational diabetes. In order to control blood sugar, women with gestational diabetes need to follow a carbohydrate-controlled diet. Sometimes, if a diet is not enough to control blood glucose levels, a woman may need to also take insulin or an oral medication like metformin . When planning your meals (under the guidance of your healthcare team), there are a couple tidbits to keep in mind. One is that your sensitivity and reactivity to carbohydrates may increase as your pregnancy progresses. Also, pregnancy with diabetes can make big demands on time which can influence your ability to preparehome-made meals. Thi Continue reading >>

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

Part 1 of 15 A healthy diet is essential to reversing prediabetes. There are no foods, herbs, drinks, or supplements that lower blood sugar. Only medication and exercise can. But there are things you can eat and drink that have a low Glycemic Index (GI). This means these foods won’t raise your blood sugar and may help you avoid a blood sugar spike. In addition to diet changes, staying or becoming active is also important. Learn which foods you can add to your diet plan. You may be able to prevent prediabetes or type 2 diabetes by adding more of these foods, spices, and drinks into your diet. Eat them as healthy alternatives to sugar, high GI carbohydrates, or other treats. Want more info like this? Sign up for our diabetes newsletter and get resources delivered right to your inbox » Part 2 of 15 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) are important components of a healthy blood sugar eating plan. They can improve insulin sensitivity. They can also help increase feelings of satiety, and have a healthy impact on blood pressure and inflammation. MUFAs are a key nutrient in avocados. Studies have shown avocados can lower the risk of metabolic syndrome. This is a group of risk factors that can increase the risk of diabetes. It can also raise the risk of blood vessel disease like heart disease and stroke. Avocados also have a low GI. For a unique, diabetes-friendly dessert, try making Oh She Glow’s natural, no sugar added, raw avocado chocolate pudding. Part 3 of 15 Protein helps the body maintain and repair itself. Since protein doesn't impact blood sugar levels, it doesn't have a GI ranking and won’t raise blood sugar levels. Protein also increases satiety, so relying on protein to feel full instead of bread, rice, or pasta may be Continue reading >>

Eat To Beat Diabetes: Delicious Dinners That Are Just 500 Calories, Quick Breakfasts That Will Keep You Full Until Lunch And Comfort Food That Could Save Your Life

Eat To Beat Diabetes: Delicious Dinners That Are Just 500 Calories, Quick Breakfasts That Will Keep You Full Until Lunch And Comfort Food That Could Save Your Life

Eat to beat diabetes: Delicious dinners that are just 500 calories, quick breakfasts that will keep you full until lunch and comfort food that could save your life Type 2 diabetes is one of greatest epidemics of modern times, experts say Nearly four million Brits have diabetes due to sedentary lifestyles or diets Meanwhile, one in three adults has pre-diabetes - high blood sugar levels Research has shown that eating 800 calories a day for eight weeks is the best way to lose weight quickly, correct your blood sugar levels and dramatically reduce your risk of diabetes (File photo) Gnawing hunger. Deprivation. For so many people, these are the images that dieting immediately conjures to mind until now. The incredible success of my revolutionary 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet is changing the face of weight loss. Research has shown that eating 800 calories a day for eight weeks is the best way to lose weight quickly, correct your blood sugar levels and dramatically reduce your risk of diabetes. And my diet plan is backed by studies which show that if it is done properly, a rapid weight-loss diet can be a safe and effective way to cut dangerous belly fat and achieve your weight-loss goals. And its really not difficult. Wheres the hardship when you can tuck into 800 calories of deliciously comforting cauliflower cheese, quiche or coq au vin? As your blood sugar levels improve you simply wont feel hungry any more. All this week, the Mail is featuring scrumptious low-calorie recipes from the 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet Recipe Book, created by my wife, GP Dr Clare Bailey, who has been using this approach very successfully with her patients. Working with nutritionist, Dr Sarah Schenker, she has created meals which contain healthy fats and nutrients and are specially designed to banish cravi Continue reading >>

15 Delicious Diabetes-friendly Dinner Ideas

15 Delicious Diabetes-friendly Dinner Ideas

For many people, dinner is a time to sit down as a family and reconnect — and it turns out that this routine is good for your health. Studies have shown that eating alone in front of the TV and eating on the go are associated with greater incidences of obesity and type 2 diabetes in both children and adults. Now that you are working to manage your type 2 diabetes, it’s even more important to sit down with people you care about and enjoy a well-planned meal together. Here are 15 tasty, diabetes-friendly dinner recipes to get you started. Tip: When dinner is served, take the time to teach your family members about the healthy-plate method and the other smart-eating tips you’ve learned. You’ll be contributing to their ongoing health as well as your own — and teaching your kids good habits now may even prevent them from developing type 2 diabetes themselves. Learn more healthy habits in Step 5. Continue reading >>

Seven-day Diabetes Meal Plan: Options For Healthful Eating

Seven-day Diabetes Meal Plan: Options For Healthful Eating

A diabetes meal plan can help. A good meal plan can help people to meet their nutritional needs, eat an appropriate mix of foods, and lose weight if needed. A 7-day diabetes meal plan not only provides a week's worth of healthful eating, but it also makes shopping and cooking duties simpler and can help people save money. Two menus for 7 days The ideal diabetes meal plan will offer menus for three meals a day, plus two snacks. Plans tend to suggest consuming 1,500 to 1,800 calories a day. The number of calories people with diabetes need to eat each day will vary, depending on their activity level, height, and gender, and whether they're trying to lose, gain, or maintain their weight. The meal plans below provide a maximum of three servings of healthful, high-fiber carbohydrate choices at each meal or snack. Diet plans for weight loss Carrying excess weight puts additional stress on the body's ability to use insulin and regulate blood sugar levels. Unfortunately, close to 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, according to the Obesity Society. It is helpful for most people with diabetes to consider weight loss guidelines when developing a meal plan. Under the guidance of a doctor, many choose to follow a reduced calorie plan. Step-by-step guide to meals for a week These three practices can help people with diabetes enjoy a healthful, varied diet and successfully manage their blood sugar: balancing carbohydrates, proteins, and fat to meet dietary goals measuring portions accurately planning ahead With these ideas in mind, the following steps can help people with diabetes put together a healthful 7-day meal plan: note daily targets for calories and carbohydrates see how many portions of carbohydrates and other foods will meet those targets divide those p Continue reading >>

Two Meals A Day 'effective' To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Two Meals A Day 'effective' To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Two meals a day 'effective' to treat type 2 diabetes By Pippa Stephens Health reporter, BBC News These are external links and will open in a new window Image caption Scientists prescribed two meals a day rich in fruit, vegetables and fibre Only eating breakfast and lunch may be more effective at managing type 2 diabetes than eating smaller, more regular meals, scientists say. Researchers in Prague fed two groups of 27 people the same calorie diet spread over two or six meals a day. They found volunteers who ate two meals a day lost more weight than those who ate six, and their blood sugar dropped. Experts said the study supported "existing evidence" that fewer, larger meals were the way forward. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough of the hormone insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. Since insulin controls the amount of sugar in the blood, this means blood sugar levels become too high. Larger studies over longer periods of time will be needed to back up these findings before we would change advice If untreated, it can lead to heart disease and stroke, nerve damage, light-sensitive eyes and kidney disease. About 2.9 million people in the UK are affected by diabetes, 90% of whom have the type 2 form of the disease. Current advice in the UK recommends three meals a day, with healthy snacks. Scientists at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague divided a group of 54 volunteers aged 30 to 70 with type 2 diabetes into two groups of 27 people. Volunteers were then given either a six-meal-a-day diet (A6) for 12 weeks followed by a two-meal day diet (B2), or vice versa. The study compared two meals with six meals - as the latter accorded with current practice advice in the Czech Republic, researc Continue reading >>

Two 8-week Blood Sugar Diet Meal Plans With Recipes

Two 8-week Blood Sugar Diet Meal Plans With Recipes

Two 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet Meal Plans with Recipes by Michael Mosley author of The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet Share Post Dr. Michael Mosley is the #1 New York Times bestselling author, with Mimi Spencer, of the FastDiet published in over thirty-two languages around the world. He is also coauthor, with Peta Bee, of FastExercise and wrote the foreword for the FastDiet Cookbook by Mimi Spencer and Dr. Sarah Schenker. Dr. Mosley trained to be a doctor at the Royal Free Hospital in London before joining the BBC, where he has been a science journalist, executive producer, and, more recently, a well-known television personality. Just getting started on The 8-Week Blood Sugar Diet? Here are two great meal plans to stay under 800 calories and they require very little preparation. Breakfast: Blueberry and Green Tea Smoothie Bring the water to a boil, add the teabag, and allow it to steep for 4 minutes. Remove the teabag and chill the tea in the fridge, preferably overnight. Place in a blender with the other ingredients and whizz together. Halve the bell pepper and remove the seeds. Brush the skin with the oil and place skin side up on a baking tray. Broil the pepper for 5 minutes. Combine all the other ingredients in a bowl. Remove the bell pepper halves from the broiler and stuff with the feta mixture. Dinner: Eggplant with Lamb and Pomegranate Preheat the oven to 425F. Place the eggplant in a roasting dish skin side down. Lightly brush with some of the oil, season with a pinch of salt and plenty of pepper, and bake in the oven for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the remaining oil in a pan, add the onion, cumin, paprika, and cinnamon and cook over medium heat for 8 minutes. Add the lamb, pine nuts, and tomato puree and cook for 8 minutes more. Just before the end of the cooking time, Continue reading >>

The Seven-day Low Sugar Diet

The Seven-day Low Sugar Diet

This week-long low sugar diet aims to keep your energy levels high and your mood regulated by balancing blood sugar with the right combination of foods at each meal and naturally sweet foods that let you indulge in a healthy way. After the first few days, your sugar cravings should reduce, and by the end of the week, theyll be much lower. Many of these dishes are filled with leafy greenvegetables, and every meal has protein, which diminishes cravings by helping keep blood sugar constant. Weve cut out almost all added sugar, as well as hyper-processed starchy foods, like bread, bagels and crackers, which are quickly digested and contribute to sugar cravings. Try to eat something every 3 to 4 hours to keep your blood sugar levels relatively stable and stave off cravings. If youre used to eating a lot of sugar, it may have dulled your taste buds to the flavours of natural foods. Dont worry just as you learned to love all that extra sugar, you can learn to unlove it. You may even find you start to dislike overly sweetened foods. After the week is over, carry your healthy habits forward by following the 80:20 rule. This means making 80 percent of what you eat similar to this plan, and the other 20 percent can include sweet treats like dark chocolate . This meal plan is intended for the average woman with a sedentary job who is working out 3 to 4 times per week. If you do endurance training, add in larger servings ofwhole-grain foods like sprouted-grain breads, whole wheat pasta, brown rice and quinoa. If the plan feels like too much food, simply cut portion size. 2 poached eggs over a bed of wilted spinach (start with about 6 cups fresh) sauted with olive oil, salt and fresh pepper. Serve with one piece of sprouted-grain toast spread with a little bit of butter. 1 cup Mexic Continue reading >>

How Does Eating Affect Your Blood Sugar?

How Does Eating Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Part 1 of 8 What is blood sugar? Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, comes from the food you eat. Your body creates blood sugar by digesting some food into a sugar that circulates in your bloodstream. Blood sugar is used for energy. The sugar that isn’t needed to fuel your body right away gets stored in cells for later use. Too much sugar in your blood can be harmful. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that is characterized by having higher levels of blood sugar than what is considered within normal limits. Unmanaged diabetes can lead to problems with your heart, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. The more you know about how eating affects blood sugar, the better you can protect yourself against diabetes. If you already have diabetes, it’s important to know how eating affects blood sugar. Part 2 of 8 Your body breaks down everything you eat and absorbs the food in its different parts. These parts include: carbohydrates proteins fats vitamins and other nutrients The carbohydrates you consume turn into blood sugar. The more carbohydrates you eat, the higher the levels of sugar you will have released as you digest and absorb your food. Carbohydrates in liquid form consumed by themselves are absorbed more quickly than those in solid food. So having a soda will cause a faster rise in your blood sugar levels than eating a slice of pizza. Fiber is one component of carbohydrates that isn’t converted into sugar. This is because it can’t be digested. Fiber is important for health, though. Protein, fat, water, vitamins, and minerals don’t contain carbohydrates. These components won’t affect your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, your carbohydrate intake is the most important part of your diet to consider when it comes to managing your blood sugar levels. Part 3 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dinner Recipes

Diabetic Dinner Recipes

Find healthy, delicious diabetic dinner recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell. Getting dinner on the table is easier when it's already planned out for you. Enjoy a month off from meal planning with 30 days of delicious, diabetes-friendly dinners to help you keep your blood sugar levels in check. The recipes in this plan limit carbohydrates, saturated fat and sodiumfactors that can negatively impact your diabetes if you eat too muchand can still be enjoyed by the whole family. Managing diabetes never tasted so good! Potatoes were first to benefit from the Hasselback techinique--making thin slices crosswise toward the bottom of the vegetable, but not all the way through, so the potato becomes fanned, seasoned and baked until crisp. Here we've adapted the concept to garlic bread and updated it with cheese for an easy and completely mouthwatering cheesy bread side dish. ADVERTISEMENT 2 ADVERTISEMENT These homemade sausage balls are a healthy riff on the original--we add riced cauliflower for moisture and a veggie boost, whole-wheat flour stands in for prepared biscuit mix, and sharp Cheddar adds flavor. Serve these sausage balls for brunch, as an appetizer, or mix them with your favorite marinara for dinner. Of all the vegetables in the supermarket, cabbage gives you some of the best value for your dollar. It's inexpensive and low in calories, but packed with nutritional benefits (vitamin C, fiber, cancer-fighting phytochemicals). This easy vegetable side dish gets a boost of flavor from shallot, caraway seeds and a delicious finish of crisp bacon. This good-for-your-gut-health food gets super-silky when slowly cooked in the oven. Serve these flavorful braised leeks with roast chicken or fish. 1 With a whopping 19 grams of protein, this one-dish meal wi Continue reading >>

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