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Blood Sugar And Sunburn

Heat And Diabetes

Heat And Diabetes

Living with diabetes blog Diabetes research is turning up new information on diabetes and diabetes management all the time. In 2009, I wrote a blog about the effects of heat on blood glucose control if you have diabetes. I mentioned, then, that heat doesn't have a direct effect on your blood glucose, but that heat can lead to changes in your daily routine which, in turn, can affect your blood glucose. Later research, published in September 2010 by researchers at Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz., suggests, additionally, that some Arizonans with diabetes have considerable gaps in their "heat awareness." This lack of awareness led to actions such as waiting until temperatures were quite high (above 101 F, or 38.3 C) before taking precautions against the heat and leaving medications and supplies at home rather than risk exposing them to the heat — meaning not having the supplies to manage diabetes while away from home. Sweating is an important means of cooling the body in hot weather, and the ability to sweat can be affected in some people with diabetes. Other studies have shown an increase in emergency room visits, in those who have diabetes, when temperatures are high. Diabetes equipment and medications can also be affected by heat. Tips for managing diabetes in warm temperatures remain the same: Avoid sunburn, it can stress your body and can raise your blood glucose. Wear a good sunscreen, sunglasses and hat when out in the sun. Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration. Carry a bottle of water with you on walks, etc. Exercise and do more strenuous activities in the early or later hours of the day when the temperatures are cooler and the sun is not at its peak. Check blood sugar levels frequently, since they may fluctuate. Remember, extreme temperature changes can have Continue reading >>

Little-known Triggers Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

Little-known Triggers Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

Play Video0:00 0:00: 0%: 0%LIVE -0:00High blood sugar ATLANTA - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the rates of diabetes and pre-diabetes in the U.S. are alarming. About 29 million Americans have diabetes. Another 89 million have blood sugar levels that are too high, a condition known as pre-diabetes. The CDC says the disorder can be managed with regular physical activity, a healthy diet and medications to control blood sugar levels, if necessary. If you’re blood glucose levels tend to run high, WebMD medical editor Dr. Hansa Bhargava says there are some other surprising triggers you need to know about. Because they can raise your blood sugar. A common one? Dehydration. "We get thirsty,” Dr. Bhargava says. “We're busy doing something, and we're thirsty, and we keep putting it off, putting it off, putting it off. And you feel very dehydrated at the end of the day. Unfortunately, if you're a diabetic, that can raise your blood sugar." Same with an illness or infection. "Because your body is trying to fight it off, you're releasing hormones that actually elevate sugar in the blood,” says Bhargava. “So it's important to know that and monitor those sugars closer when that happens." Getting a sunburn can also trigger a jump in blood sugar, for the same reason infections and illnesses can cause a spike. And WebMD points out certain medications can impact blood glucose: corticosteroids for arthritis pain, diuretics, or water pills, certain blood pressure medications and some drugs for depression. If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes, Dr. Bhargava says, ask your physician whether a new medication could affect your blood sugar. And even that morning cup of coffee -- or two -- can be problematic for some diabetics. “Everybody is different,” says Dr. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Sunburn

Hypoglycemia And Sunburn

Treato found 28 discussions about Sunburn and Hypoglycemia on the web. Symptoms and conditions also mentioned with Hypoglycemia in patients' discussions Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After you eat, your blood absorbs glucose. If you eat more sugar than your body needs, your muscles, and liver store the extra. When your blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone tells your liver to release glucose. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov. Ultraviolet (UV) rays are an invisible form of radiation. They can pass through your skin and damage your skin cells. Sunburns are a sign of skin damage. Suntans aren't healthy, either. They appear after the sun's rays have already killed some cells and damaged others. UV rays can cause skin damage during any season or at any temperature. They can also cause eye problems, wrinkles, skin spots, and skin cancer. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov. made it harder since my feet hurt from being used so much ... August 21, 2005 | bodybuildingdungeon.com -got back from the airport/vacation around 6pm, went straight out to dinner with gf and her parents....then unpacked...then immediately got back to my cardio -made it harder since my feet hurt from being used so much last few days, plus having sunburn on my shins, top of feet, quads, stomach chest and sides read more... /> -came home to find my mom is alot worse....i was very angry when i ran and really pushed the run hard...now im very dizzy...need sugar...blood sugar low methinks...gonna go do that now..." Mayo Clinic University Hospital Johns Hopkins Hospital Cleveland Clinic Major Hospital City Hospital College Medical Center Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or Continue reading >>

Can Sunburn Raise Blood Sugar?

Can Sunburn Raise Blood Sugar?

Tweet With the warmer weather finally here, my wife and I headed to our community pool yesterday. It was an overcast day, with the sun only occasionally peeking through the clouds. I decided to forgo the sunscreen for most of the two hours we were there, eventually applying some to my shoulders an hour in. Needless to say, it doesn’t take bright sun to give you a burn, and today I woke up a bit sore and slightly pink all over my upper body. The strange part is that I tested my sugar both during the night and in the morning and it was much higher than normal (even after giving myself a correction bolus (dose of insulin) during the night. This led me to wonder, “Can sunburn raise my blood sugar level?” After doing a bit of research, I discovered that the simple answer is yes, sunburn can raise your blood sugar. Since I’m usually pretty good about applying sunscreen, this was something that hasn’t happened often enough in the nine years that I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for me to put two and two together. However, since my blood sugar is now under much tighter control than it used to be, it’s easier to recognize any unexpected deviations. Basically, what I discovered is that sunburn can stress your body and in turn raise your blood glucose just like other stresses to your body can. As for how long you can expect your blood glucose to be elevated, some Type 1s have experienced elevated blood sugars for several days after the initial burn, likely depending in part on its severity. I seem to have gotten mine under control within 24 hours, as it has stayed level since this afternoon. The effects of sunburn on blood glucose should not have come as a surprise to me since the same thing happens when Type 1s get sick, which is another form of stress on the body. Also, Continue reading >>

Summer Skin Care With Diabetes

Summer Skin Care With Diabetes

The heat is on and this may mean skin problems for people with diabetes. Proper skin care is important all year round, but especially during the summer season. From sunburn and insect bites to dry skin and poison ivy, there are several precautions that should be taken to have the best possible summer skin with diabetes. Medications Matter People with chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and blood pressure issues are often on multiple medications for disease management. Certain medications may matter when it comes to your skin. Talk to Your Doctor If you are taking pills, creams or salves for any medical condition, consult with your doctor or pharmacist before going into the sun. Certain medications, including diuretics, antibiotics and heart medications can make you more susceptible to sun-related issues. This includes over sensitivity and sunburn in the sun. Diabetes pills including Glyburide, Glipizide, and Glimeperide (sulfonylureas) are specific medications that may cause photosensitivity. You may need to be especially guarded from the sun when taking these medicines. Staying Hydrated in the Heat During the hottest days, people perspire and lose water. The loss of body fluids can lead to dehydration. It is important to stay hydrated in the summer for the best possible diabetes skin care and to avoid other health issues. Blood Glucose Control, Dehydration, and Skin Poor blood glucose control may also lead to dehydration. If your blood glucose levels are high your body may lose more urine. Monitor your blood sugar especially during the heat to maintain the best possible control. Drink plenty of fluids, such as water and sugar-free tea or lemonade. Any zero calorie beverages will do the trick. Limit or eliminate your intake of beverages with alcohol and/or Continue reading >>

How Heat And Humidity May Affect Blood Sugar

How Heat And Humidity May Affect Blood Sugar

Hot weather does not directly alter blood glucose levels. However, sweltering temperatures affect our metabolism and the release of hormones. Heat and humidity influence how much and how fast we move, how much we perspire, blood circulation, the foods we want to eat, and the activities we choose to enjoy. Any of these factors, or a combination, might contribute to the experience of dehydration and blood sugar fluctuations. Six Steamy-Weather Influences We know when it is sizzling outside that we will sweat, and as the air wicks moisture from our skin the body cools. This cooling system works wonderfully as long as our body remains hydrated. If our body is low on fluids, the kidneys receive less blood flow and work less effectively. This might cause blood glucose concentrations to rise. If someone’s blood sugar is already running high in the heat, not only will they lose water through sweat but they might urinate more frequently too, depleting their body’s fluids even more. When the weather is tropical - hot and humid - the sweat on our skin cannot readily evaporate into the already soggy air. Our innate cooling system is less effective and the risk of heat exhaustion increases. Having poorly controlled or difficult-to-control blood sugar can inhibit some people’s ability to sweat. Without this effective natural cooling process, they are at higher risk for overheating—even when the humidity is not too high. While many diabetics notice higher blood sugar in hot weather, some individuals need less insulin when the weather turns significantly warmer. Although science has not figured out why this occurs, it may be owed to the dilation or widening of small blood vessels in hot temps. As these tiny blood vessels dilate, the body’s delivery system becomes more efficie Continue reading >>

Can Sunburn Raise Blood Glucose In Non-diabetic?

Can Sunburn Raise Blood Glucose In Non-diabetic?

Can sunburn raise blood glucose in non-diabetic? Ok, a tad history...due to very slight elevated fasting blood glucose (range 105-118)...my doc has me testing randomly with the suspicion of pre-diabetes. I am 37yrs, 5'5", 120 pounds (although has varied last few months up and down 10 pounds), athletic. So weight and activity not an issue at all. Type 1... show more Ok, a tad history...due to very slight elevated fasting blood glucose (range 105-118)...my doc has me testing randomly with the suspicion of pre-diabetes. I am 37yrs, 5'5", 120 pounds (although has varied last few months up and down 10 pounds), athletic. So weight and activity not an issue at all. Type 1 Diabetes is prominent in my family...mother was Type 1 and also a cousin on my dads side. Grandmother also became Type 2 a few years before her death. She was not overweight either. Although I don't have the lifestyle risks, I do have genetic risks, so Doc wants me testing first thing in morning, before eating, 2 hours post eating, and max every 3-4 hours random if not fasting or around the eating times. Also log what eat, drink, feel, and activity. So far I've ranged from low of 101 (not fasting) to high of 190. Fastings have been consistant in the range I listed above. Meter has 5+/- accuracy. Anyway...this past weekend I went to a outdoor Rock event for 3 days. It was quite warm the first day and I got slightly sunburnt. Not real bad, just a little red. 2 days ago (the day after the sunburn) I had a reading of 230!!! I hadn't eaten anything in 5 hours and was only drinking tons of water. Due to the shock of how high this was (never had this high before that I know of) I washed my hands and tested again just to make sure. That reading was 231. Since then, the lowest blood sugar I've had during a random tes Continue reading >>

9 Skin Care Tips For Sun Safety

9 Skin Care Tips For Sun Safety

Look for a broad-spectrum sunscreen, which will block both UVA and UVB rays, with an SPF of at least 30. "The higher the number, the better," says Jeannette Graf, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "If someone's going to be outdoors for a long time, I recommend they go with at least SPF 50." The point of sunscreen is to cover your entire bodynot just the parts you can easily reach. According to Graf, the average adult needs to apply at least a shot glass of sunscreen for full protection. Kids generally require half that amount. Some often-overlooked areas: the tops of the ears, the bottoms of the feet, under the arms, between toes (wash away lotion and dry thoroughly after you're out of the sun), on the scalp where the hair parts, and over the scalp for those with thinning hair (consider spray sunscreen for easy application). Reapply sunscreen every two hours and any time that you emerge from water. Use baby oil around the edges of an infusion set or sensor adhesive pad to loosen it from sunburned or irritated skin. Harmful UV rays can damage your eyesight, so wearing sunglasses is a must, especially if you have retinopathy or cataracts. Look for labels that say the lenses protect against 99 to 100 percent of UVA and UVB rays. If you have foot ulcers or other wounds on your skin, don't cover them with sunscreen. Instead, ensure the wounds are clean and cover them with a bandage. In addition to blocking harmful rays, the bandage will keep bacteria from entering the wound. You've heard the warnings against going barefoot when blood glucose levels are high, nerve sensation is low, or circulation is poor. People without feeling in their feet can even get second-degree burns from standing in hot sand for too long. Each nig Continue reading >>

Sunburn!!! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Sunburn!!! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Just got back from a weekend to a very sunny blackpool, had a fantastic time,BUT, didn't realise that it was sunny as was cloudy and didn't feel at all hot. Any to cut a long story short, i got sunburnt, shoulders across back of neck and down arms to elbow, jeeze its sooooo sore. But would gettin sunburn effect my blood sugars, have just managed to get them under better control, and an now averaging in the 6's, but since yesterday my sugars have gone up greatly, in the 10's at mostly every reading and wondered if the sunburn could be to blame as not eating any different, yes i did relax my diet a bit over the weekend, but would have thought my bloods would fluxuate, and not contatantly be high p.s. next time am goin abroad, never got sunburnt in my life before and i will admit today i have cried like a baby due to the pain!!!!. but the old remedy of strong cold tea really works!!! +1 on that. Sunburn can almost be considered another kind of trauma and your body will release a whole cocktail of things to try and deal. You may find that your sugars will runn high or that you need to increase your insulin slightly until it gets better. Last time I managed to burn myself well I tested a bit more often and just made sure I kept well hydrated. I found I had to do more correction doses with meals but it all settled down after a few days. Of course one thing to remember is warm days can change how quickly your body absorbs insulin and may increase its effects. SO we get back to keep testing Hope your sunburn heals up soon and you end up with a nice tan instead of it just falling off. Blackpool was great, better than i expected, i havn't been there since i was Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

How To Manage Your Diabetes In Extreme Summer Heat

We often look forward to changes of season, but if you have diabetes , you need to be extra careful when temperatures climb dramatically. Extreme heat can affect your blood sugar control. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy If you use insulin or if your treatment of blood sugars is inadequate, this can put you at higher risk. Often, worsening blood sugar control is the main concern. Depending on the situation and your level of physical activity, low blood sugars are also possible. Extreme temperatures can also damage your medications and testing equipment. I always remind my patients to take precautions to protect themselves and their supplies during both winter and summer. If a patient’s blood sugars are mostly higher than 250 mg/dl, I recommend improving blood sugar control before engaging in heavy physical activity — regardless of the climate and the temperature, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. The extreme heat of summer affects blood sugar levels. How the heat affects your levels depends on what you’ve eaten, whether you’re well-hydrated and your activity level. If the heat and your activity make you sweat profusely, you may become dehydrated, leading to a rise in glucose levels. If you become dehydrated, your blood glucose levels will rise. This can lead to frequent urination, which then leads to further dehydration and even higher blood sugar levels — a kind of vicious cycle. Further, if the treatment includes insulin, dehydration reduces blood supply to the skin and, therefore, less absorption of injected insulin dosage. Most types of insulin can tolerate temperatures from 93 degrees F to 95 d Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

When you first found out you had diabetes, you tested your blood sugar often to understand how food, activity, stress, and illness could affect your blood sugar levels. By now, you’ve got it figured out for the most part. But then—bam! Something makes your blood sugar zoom up. You try to adjust it with food or activity or insulin, and it dips really low. You’re on a rollercoaster no one with diabetes wants to ride. Knowledge is power! Look out for these surprising triggers that can send your blood sugar soaring: Sunburn—the pain causes stress, and stress increases blood sugar levels. Artificial sweeteners—more research needs to be done, but some studies show they can raise blood sugar. Coffee—even without sweetener. Some people’s blood sugar is extra-sensitive to caffeine. Losing sleep—even just one night of too little sleep can make your body use insulin less efficiently. Skipping breakfast—going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner. Time of day—blood sugar can be harder to control the later it gets. Dawn phenomenon—people have a surge in hormones early in the morning whether they have diabetes or not. For people with diabetes, blood sugar can spike. Dehydration—less water in your body means a higher blood sugar concentration. Nose spray—some have chemicals that trigger your liver to make more blood sugar. Gum disease—it’s both a complication of diabetes and a blood sugar spiker. Watch out for other triggers that can make your blood sugar fall. For example, extreme heat can cause blood vessels to dilate, which makes insulin absorb more quickly and could lead to low blood sugar. If an activity or food or situation is new, be sure to check your blood sugar levels before and after to see how you respo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Proper care, awareness crucial to maintaining healthy skin Skin is the largest organ in your body. Many people with diabetes are more likely to develop skin problems. While some are minor and mainly cosmetic, others can be fatal. “Diabetes tends to dry out the skin as part of the disease process,” said Jeffrey Meffert, MD, program director, dermatology at University Health System’s Diabetes Institute in San Antonio, Texas. “Some of the medications used can make the problem worse.” When blood sugar is high the body loses fluid, causing the skin to become dry. Dry skin in diabetes is related to damage to the nerves that cause sweating, the body’s main lubricating system. Dry skin and infections Dry skin can lead to many major concerns in diabetes. Cracking and peeling results in openings in the skin, allowing bacteria or fungi to enter the body. High levels of sugar in the body are great breeding grounds and reduce your body’s ability to heal itself, increasing the chances an infection may spread. Several different kinds of bacterial infections occur more often in people with diabetes. Among these are: • styes in the glands of the eyelids; • boils; • folliculitis of the hair follicles; • carbuncles — very deep infections of the skin and underlying tissue; and • infections around the nails. “With bacterial infections, you most often first see a redness around the area of the cut or crack,” said Matthew G. Garoufalis, DPM, a podiatrist in private practice in Chicago. “People with diabetes are at a disadvantage because they often will not feel pain, which can be an early warning that an infection is occurring. As it progresses, you may also see drainage from the wound, and it may become warm to the touch.” Fungal infections also are a concer Continue reading >>

People In The Know: Sun, Swimming, And Controlling Blood Sugar

People In The Know: Sun, Swimming, And Controlling Blood Sugar

Q: My daughter has been spending long days by the pool with her friends this month. How will all that sunning and swimming affect her blood sugar management? A: Summer fun and type 1 diabetes do mix, just as long as your daughter is willing to take a few extra sun safety steps. For starters, make sure she is staying hydrated by drinking plenty of water and other appropriate fluids when outdoors for long stretches. If blood sugar goes high over the course of a day, it can result in fluid loss. Add to that the fluid loss from being outside in hot, sticky weather and it’s a recipe for dehydration — which in turn can lead to problems like heat exhaustion. Before your daughter heads out for the day, make sure she has enough bottled water and other carbohydrate-free drinks to keep her fluid intake steady. Next, does she wear sunscreen? For anyone, spending too much time in the sun can result in sunburn and skin damage when skin is left unprotected. But for someone with type 1, an extensive sunburn can trigger the release of stress hormones — and these hormones then increase risk for high blood sugar. For basic protection, look for a waterproof sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, though children and teens with more delicate skin may need a different level. Wearing a sun hat and limiting skin exposure when the sun’s rays are strongest (late morning and early afternoon) can also help protect skin from damage. It’s also important to keep all diabetes supplies away from direct sun and heat: Insulin can lose strength with heat exposure, glucose test strips may be inaccurate if stored in extreme heat, and hot meters may give inaccurate blood sugar results. Storing supplies in an insulated lunch bag tucked inside a larger tote (and then kept in a shady spot) usually works Continue reading >>

The 411 Skinny On Diabetes... And Your Skin

The 411 Skinny On Diabetes... And Your Skin

Here's a quick biology quiz: what is the largest organ in your body? Time's up! It's... your skin! Did you get it right? Despite the fact that your skin is on the outside, it is your largest organ and as we've discussed in previous editions in our 411 on Diabetes Complications series, diabetes can affect every organ in (or on!) your body. This goes for your skin too! With the summer heat barreling down, more of us are exposing our skin. We all know that we need to protect our skin from the sun by using sunscreen, but did you know there are other ways to keep your skin healthy from the damages of diabetes? Yep. According to the ADA, about a third of people with diabetes will have some kind of skin condition. Fortunately, most of them are easily detectable and treatable if caught early. Skin Complications: What Are They? Believe it or not, there are a lot of potential diabetes skin complications, ranging from fairly common (20-30% of PWDs) to extremely rare (less than .5%). We can't dig into all of them in just one post, but here are the highlights of some more common skin complications to keep an eye out for: Infections - Bacterial Infections: This includes gross things like styes, boils, carbuncles and infections around the nails. Yuck! Bacterial infections will also set in when you have a wound that won't heal, like a foot ulcer. Even blisters can become infected if not properly cared for. Infections are especially common in folks with peripheral diabetic neuropathy, because their wounds are much less likely to heal quickly. Although antibiotics can take care of this quickly, it's important to not let things fester (pun!). - Fungal Infections: One type of fungal infection, the yeast infection, is common in women with diabetes, but fungal infections can also occur betwe Continue reading >>

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