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Blood Sugar And Infertility

Infertility In Women

Infertility In Women

Tweet Diabetes is associated with lower rates of fertility. There are a number of reasons which can play a part including, obesity, being underweight, having diabetic complications, having PCOS and having an autoimmune disease. With this said, many women with diabetes are able to conceive, particularly if diabetes is well controlled and a healthy body weight is maintained. Conditions The following conditions are associated with reduced fertility rates: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Oligomenorrhea (irregular periods) Secondary amenorrhea (absent periods) Premature menopause (premature ovarian failure) Endometrial cancer (uterine cancer) Microvascular and cardiovascular complications Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) PCOS is a common condition in which a large number of cysts develop on the ovaries. Whilst this feature does not in itself pose a health risk, it can reduce fertility. Women with PCOS have higher than normal levels of testosterone (hyperandrogenism). PCOS can affect fertility by leading to irregular periods (oligomenorrhea) or absent periods (secondary amenorrhea). The condition can be treated through making lifestyle changes, while medications such as clomifene and metformin can help with improving the chances of conception. PCOS is particularly associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes that are taking high amounts of insulin daily may also be at risk of or suffer from PCOS. Oligomenorrhea and secondary amenorrhea Oligomenorrhea is the term for irregular periods that arrive at intervals of 35 days or more between each period. Secondary amenorrhea is said to occur if you have previously had a normal menstrual cycle but have stopped getting a periods for 6 months or longer. Both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are associate Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar, Insulin & Your Fertility

Blood Sugar, Insulin & Your Fertility

Insomnia, you may wake up feeling jittery Frequent and/or intense hunger, feeling emotional when you're hungry (the word hangry was invented for this reason) If we regularly experience these rises in blood sugar, followed by rises in insulin, overtime our body may become less and less sensitive to insulin's message and thus less and less efficient at actually pulling the excess sugar out of the blood. The body will keep making more insulin, but the feedback system is broken, blood sugar remains dangerously high. This pattern of Insulin Resistance (IR) typically leads to pre-diabetes or diabetes. It's also linked to low ovarian function, infertility, and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS.) Here are some signs of IR, pre-diabetes, or diabetes: Hormone imbalance and/or irregular cycles Sleep -there's a link between people who get very little sleep/work a night shift and IR If you have developed IR, pre-diabetes, or diabetes, treatment is necessary. Depending on severity, your recommended treatment may include medication,dietary recommendations, and/or blood sugar monitoring. But it is important to work with a physician to create a treatment plan that works for you, because this condition can become quite serious if it goes untreated. Hemoglobin A1C rises in response to the average levels of blood sugar in your body over the past 3-4 months. I think of it as your blood sugar report card. It's one of the main factors used to diagnose IR, pre-diabetes, and diabetes. It is also monitored in patients who already have pre-diabetes and diabetes to make sure their blood sugar levels are being controlled. Typically hemoglobin A1C is screened as part of standard blood work, but if you have any symptoms of IR, pre-diabetes, or diabetes, or if you've been trying to conceive for over Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Sugar On Your Fertility

The Impact Of Sugar On Your Fertility

We all know eating too many sugar-laden cupcakes, sweets and biscuits puts you at risk of obesity, diabetes and loads of other health problems. But did you know sugar can also affect your fertility? It doesn't take much for the extremely sensitive female reproductive system to be disrupted and the main culprits are stress, travel and (drumroll please...) diet. Experts cite the biggest hormone disrupters within our diet as alcohol, caffeine, dairy and sugar. Even the slightest hormone imbalances can trigger many conditions which have the potential to affect fertility think PMS, PCOS and endometriosis. Sugar in all forms whether in a cup of tea or honey spread on toast has an effect on insulin levels, or blood sugar. Instead of keeping blood sugar even, it makes it peak suddenly (feeling good!) then plummet just as rapidly (feeling irritable, hungry again). Dr Marilyn Glenville PhD , nutritionist specialising in fertility and women's health and author of The Natural Health Bible for Women explains: "Sugar can make you gain weight, as the more sugar you eat, the more insulin your body releases. The more insulin is released, the more of your food is converted into fat, and your body also fails to break down previously stored fat. Fat stored on your body is a manufacturing plant for oestrogen, and this creates a hormone imbalance. So that's why it's important not to carry too much excess weight. Sugar is also 'empty' calories, as it doesn't give you any nutritional value. So when you're trying to nourish your body and give it the right tools to conceive, you don't want to eat foods that have a negative effect on your health." Sugar isn't just hard on your fertility because of its impact on fat levels. It can also contribute to endometriosis a condition where cells from the Continue reading >>

7 Strategies To Reverse Infertility

7 Strategies To Reverse Infertility

My husband and I are suffering from infertility, my patient tells me. Does this have to do with things like lifestyle, or is it just bad luck? Is there anything we can do to reverse this situation? Im sad to say today one in seven couples suffer from infertility, which researchers define as the diminished ability or the inability to conceive and have offspring, or more specifically, failure to conceive after a year of regular intercourse without contraception. The questions becomes, why have infertility rates increased? While there are no easy answers here, I dont believe its coincidence that infertility has increased just like diabetes and obesity has.Thats because excess sugar and subsequent belly fat drive hormonal imbalances and create infertility. In women, these imbalances manifest as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), which is really a nutritional and metabolic problem that adversely affects insulin and other hormones. PCOS symptoms include irregular or heavy periods, acne, facial hair, scalp hair loss, increased belly fat, and increased levels of testosterone. Studies show PCOS affects 8 to 12 percent of all women , which interestingly correlates with the number of couples who suffer infertility. In men, infertility manifests as lower testosterone, which indicates other hormones like insulin are also out of whack. Among the consequences are bellies, breasts (or man boobs), low sperm count, and decreased sex drive . While problems like PCOS and low testosterone need to be properly assessed, diagnosed, and treated to get your metabolism working again, you have far more control over infertility than you might realize. Many of these hormone imbalances are primarily caused by pre-diabetes . A diet heavy in sugar and refined carbohydrates increases insulin levels to Continue reading >>

Stable Blood Sugar Levels For Fertility

Stable Blood Sugar Levels For Fertility

Maintaining good blood sugar regulation is extremely important to give yourself the best possible chance of getting pregnant fast. Peaking and plummeting blood sugar levels, diabetes and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) can have a detrimental effect on fertility. What is blood sugar and what does it mean to my fertility? The sugar in blood is called glucose and our bodies use it for everything from walking and talking to breathing and thinking. Any food we eat has an impact on our blood sugar levels, which peak and trough depending on how we fuel our body. Our blood sugar levels rise after a meal and fall again as our body either uses the energy or stores it away. [list type=”warning”] [list_item]Imbalanced blood sugar levels – both too much and too little can be dangerous and this is not ideal if you want to be in optimum health or get pregnant and create a truly healthy baby![/list_item] [list_item]Poor blood sugar control can lead to more serious conditions that directly impact fertility and overall health including insulin resistance, diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) to name a few.[/list_item] [/list] Diabetes and PCOS Women who have diabetes tend to start their periods a little later in life; similarly they also go through menopause slightly earlier and thus have a shorter fertility window. Additionally, women who have type 2 diabetes (the most common form of diabetes, affecting 85-90 per cent of all diabetes cases) also often have PCOS. Because of the effects of PCOS on the ovaries, women with type 2 diabetes and PCOS may have a harder time falling pregnant. PCOS is considered to be the major cause of lowered fertility in women of the reproductive age. Women who have the syndrome often don’t ovulate and may also have degrees of insulin resist Continue reading >>

How Sugar Impacts Your Fertility

How Sugar Impacts Your Fertility

By Shady Grove Fertility December 23, 2016 3 Comments The holidays are upon us and you know what that means, tempting candy canes, cookies, and pies. Did you know that the USDA estimates the average American consumes 54 pounds of added sugar per yearthat translates to 67g of added sugar per day, which adds up to a whopping 270 calories. Its important to note there are naturally occurring sugars, found naturally in foods such as fruits (fructose) and dairy (lactose), while added sugars are the sugars and syrups put in foods during preparation or processing. Added sugars do not provide our bodies with nutrients like their natural counterparts. Instead, excess added sugar intake has been associated with increasing blood pressure, weight gain, and type 2 diabetes. We often think of candy and baked goods as the usual sugary suspects; however, the majority of added sugars sneak into our diets through sweetened beverages like soft drinks, sweetened coffees and teas, energy drinks; and even flavored waters. Of course we mustnt forget about added sugars that hide in breakfast bars, cereals, yogurts, and condiments too. The American Heart Association recommends limiting your daily added sugar intake to 24 grams or 6 teaspoons (100 calories) for women and 36 grams or 9 teaspoons (150 calories) for men. Describing how Sugar Impacts Your Fertility Drinking sweetened beverages and eating high glycemic, processed carbohydrates (low in fiber and packed with added sugars) quickly spike blood sugars, causing a sharp rise in insulin levels. Insulin is a hormone our body produces to move sugar into our cells so it can be used for energy. Because insulin is chemically similar to the ovarian hormones that help our eggs mature, the ovaries confuse elevated insulin with their own growth facto Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat

Diabetes Mellitus: The Infertility Triple Threat Colors as possibility. Feathers in a kite shop, Beijing, China Based on the feedback received from doctors reading the blog, we are introducing a new feature: Case of the Month. This Case of the Month is an actual patient from The Turek Clinic . It is presented to recognize American Diabetes Association Alert Day . He is a 31-year old who has been trying to conceive with his 28-year old wife for 2 years. During this time, he has noticed a lower sex drive and has had trouble ejaculating . His medical history is negative except for a 6-year history of diabetes mellitus that is well controlled with insulin injections. Exacerbated, he states I really dont know whats happening to me! Upon further questioning, the sex drive issue started even before they were trying to conceive. Regarding ejaculation, the patient states that his erections are not very strong and, although he has the sensation of climax, nothing comes out of the penis with ejaculation. In fact, he is concerned that things might be backing up in his body with these symptoms. First identified as a disease of sweet urine in ancient times, diabetes mellitus a metabolic disease characterized by high blood sugar ( glucose ) levels. It is one of the most common medical diseases in the U.S., affecting 26 million adults and children or about 8% of the population . Among those affected, about 15 million are people of reproductive age. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin , a hormone produced by the pancreas. When the blood glucose rises, say after eating food, insulin is released to decrease the glucose level. In patients with diabetes, there is low or no production of insulin and therefore blood sugar levels are elevated. The sugars spill int Continue reading >>

Infertility & Pre-diabetes – What's The Relationship?

Infertility & Pre-diabetes – What's The Relationship?

Because of that, we will be dedicating Mondays in November to this topic and how it relates to infertility and fertility treatment. Reproductive Medicine Associates of Connecticut (RMACT) has had its focus on this topic for quite a while. Carolyn Gundell, MS, one of RMACT’s Fertility Nutritionists talked about diabetes and its connection to fertility three years ago in 2012 on PathtoFertility. In case you haven’t had a chance to read her thoughtful piece, here it is again. Best thing about Carolyn’s piece? How hopeful it is. And how she explains things in a way that is manageable and accessible to a non-clinical person reading it. Pre-diabetes and diabetes are conditions that do need to be examined if you are trying to conceive. Isn’t it a relief to know that there are programs in place, led by qualified, knowledgeable and passionate professionals that can turn a situation around so that it’s safe and effective to try to become and stay pregnant? Think of this as a preview for November. You will hear more from Carolyn Gundell, MS, Dr. Spencer Richlin, (RMACT’s Surgical Director and lead physician for the Diabetes Program), Melissa Kelleher, LCSW (one of RMACT’s Fertility Counselors) and more. Do you have questions about why this is an important subject? Or how it could affect you? Please let us know. We’re happy to find the right person to answer your questions. When it comes to pre-diabetes and diabetes, we have made sure that we have the right professionals to help with these serious, but manageable problems. ~Lisa Rosenthal November is Diabetes Awareness Month. As I think about this, I recall many patients who I have counseled through ourNutrition Program for pre-diabetic and diabetic conditions. I remember their disappointment as we discussed that th Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Infertility | Ivf1

Insulin Resistance And Infertility | Ivf1

Insulin Resistance: A Cause for not Ovulating There are many reasons why a woman may not ovulate. Some women are resistant to the hormone insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps keep blood sugar under control. Insulin is part of a complex system that keeps the blood sugar low. It is estimated that 25% to 50% of overweight adults have insulin resistance. If blood sugar, also known as blood glucose levels, become too high, then a person is said to have diabetes. There are two main causes for diabetes: failure to make insulin (Type 1 Diabetes) and becoming resistant to the effects of insulin (Type 2 Diabetes). In women, there are two common conditions that may result in insulin resistance: PCOS , also known as polycystic ovary syndrome , and obesity . Some women with PCOS are also obese. This can intensify the symptoms of PCOS. Women may also be obese and have insulin resistance without having PCOS. Women with PCOS or obesity or both problems will commonly have problems with ovulation. Common signs that a woman may not be ovulating involve disruption of the normal pattern her menstrual cycles. Women who do not ovulate will often note absence of their periods, infrequent periods or irregular periods. Rarely, a woman with regular monthly periods may not be ovulating. Diagnosis of insulin resistance can sometimes be challenging. This is due to wide variations in the levels of the hormones needed to assess for insulin resistance. When insulin resistance occurs, the body needs a higher level of insulin to keep the blood glucose under control. Therefore, high insulin levels are frequently seen in this condition. Other possible signs of insulin resistance include: Acanthosis nigricans a dark velvety appearance of the skin usually around the neck, under Continue reading >>

How Eating Sugar Can Stop Ovulation

How Eating Sugar Can Stop Ovulation

Sorry folks, this is probably the least you are going to weigh for the rest of the year, said Alex Gil, a friend of mine on Facebook and well known personal trainer. Ah yes, I said to myself, she must be referring to the upcoming holiday season. While I consume significant amounts of sugar all year long, I probably double my normal intake during the holidays. Of course I would like to cut back on sugar to look awesome in a swimsuit and be uber healthy. The thing is, however, I love cookies. The first time I read an article nearly 10 years ago, about sugar being dangerous, I got angry. Why are nutritionist always taking away the things I love to eat?! Bread, coffee, beer, cheese and now sugar. Sugar is fine! Leave my sugar alone. I was speaking like a true addict. As we continue to get heavier and sicker we can not escape the truth about sugar any longer. This is not like other fads we've gone through, for example,the fat is unhealthy, oh never mind, it actually is healthy' fad. This is like how our grandparents generation had to face the hard reality that their favorite habit, smoking, is not at all healthy. We simply are not made to consume the amount of sugar we put into our bodies each day. We are consuming 40% more sugar than we did in the 1950s ( source ). Studies find that on average we eat 22.2 teaspoons of sugar per day when we should be consuming 6 or less teaspoons per day ( source ). For some perspective: one 20oz bottle of Gatorade has 34 grams of sugar or 8.5 teaspoons of sugar and Mott's Plus for Kids' Health Juice Apple Grape has 48 grams of sugar or 11 teaspoons of sugar. We know and understand that other animals have dietary restrictions - you dont feed a dog chocolate and you dont feed your fish cookies. While we humans can eat quite a variety of food Continue reading >>

Sugar May Contribute To Infertility

Sugar May Contribute To Infertility

Home 40+ Sugar May Contribute to Infertility Sugar may contribute to infertility?! Thats right, consuming sugar regularly may lead to infertility, or make fertility issues you already have worse. As we move through the holiday season, we are bombarded with little treats filled with refined sugar at every turn. The cakes, cookies, cocktails, wine, fudge, candies; the list goes on. So why even care, are we not supposed to enjoy ourselves and indulge a little? Well, while that may be fine for others, if you are struggling with fertility issues, it may be a good idea to look into alternatives to sugary foods, most importantly refined white sugars. This includes white table sugar, white flour, white corn (including corn syrup, darn no pecan pie!), white rice and alcoholic beverages. Most treats we love are made from these ingredients. High-fructose corn syrup is found in most pre-packaged foods at the supermarket! The Cascade of Fertility Problems Created by Sugar Food containing these ingredients are broken down quickly by the body, this raises our insulin levels too quickly. But how does this affect my hormone levels? This quick spike in sugar levels creates a high in our bodies that last from 15-30 minutes. After that, our sugar levels plummet, leaving the body drained and exhausted. This creates what is referred to as fight or flight reaction in the body, due to continued stimulation of the adrenal glands . This drop in sugar levels, signal the adrenal glands to release the hormone cortisol and adrenalin in an attempt to replenish sugar levels. Repeated stimulation of the adrenal glands to release cortisol and adrenalin, weakens the adrenal glands. Hormones produced by the adrenals are not produced in abundance; the adrenals become sluggish. This may lead to hormonal im Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Infertility: When Blood Sugar Control Isn’t Enough

Diabetes And Infertility: When Blood Sugar Control Isn’t Enough

An excerpt from the book, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby. Maybe your blood sugars have been great and you’ve been having ongoing sex with your partner. But if you’re still not pregnant after six to twelve months of trying, you’re considered infertile. Dealing with infertility and diabetes can feel like an energy-draining double whammy of health issues, but you’re not alone. There’s a definite group of women with diabetes who require even more maintenance and medical specialists to figure out why, once again, their bodies aren’t doing what seems to come naturally for everyone else. What’s Going On? Infertility is an inability to get pregnant. You are considered infertile after a year of actively trying to conceive (i.e., having unprotected sex around the time you ovulate) if you are younger than 35, and after six months if you’re 35 or older, or if you have a history of many miscarriages. The timeframe is key: It can take some fertile couples that long to conceive naturally, while older women are advised to seek help sooner since fertility declines rapidly with age. About 10 to 15 percent of all couples experience infertility. Of those, about 40 to 50 percent are caused by female infertility, while another 30 to 40 percent are caused by male infertility. The rest are either a combination of male and female factors, or are simply unexplained as one of life’s many mysteries. Several factors can lead to infertility, according to the national infertility association RESOLVE: age, weight, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Fallopian tube disease, endometriosis, exposure to a chemical known as Diethylstilbestrol (DES), smoking, and alcohol use. Diabetes and Infertility: Are They Related? While all the above are ge Continue reading >>

Sugar Affects Fertility

Sugar Affects Fertility

A recent study suggests a link between increased consumption of sugar and infertility. Alkaline foods such as fresh fruits, vegetables, unsweetened milk, yogurt, nuts, beans, lentils, etc. act as great alternatives to sugary foods. Theres a surprising connection between consumption of sugar and fertility. Sugar-sweetened beverages consumed every day by either partner reduce the couples chances of pregnancy, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Epidemiology. Sugar or increased glucose levels in the body do not have a direct link with fertility but the associated complications like insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, weight gain, lowered immunity and hormonal imbalance are found to decline the fertility potential of the individual. Dr Saroja Koppala, senior fertility consultant, explains how a high-sugar diet makes it difficult for the body to break down stored fat, leading to disruptions inside the body, causing fertility problems. How does intake of sugar affect the fertility rate? High glucose levels in the blood lead to hormone disruption as there is weight gain and insulin resistance in the body. In conception, hormones like estrogen and progesterone play vital roles. One of the common problems that arise due to hormonal imbalance is ovulatory dysfunction in women, that is, difficulty in the eggs being released from the ovaries. Often there are symptoms such as irregular or absent menses. Another hormonal imbalance disorder associated with insulin resistance called PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) is also common in women. PCOS occurs in 1 in 10 women. In men, high blood glucose levels can affect testosterone levels causing problems with sperm production. About 30-40% of infertility cases are because of reduced sperm count and poor quality spe Continue reading >>

Why Sugar And Your Fertility Dont Mix

Why Sugar And Your Fertility Dont Mix

As the song goes, just a spoonful of sugar helps Well not when it comes to your fertility or your health for that matter. Studies have shown that excess sugar can suppress the immune system and repeated use of excess sugar can lead to a host of fertility problems, including hormone disruption, insulin resistance, PCOS, yeast infections, vitamin and mineral deficiency and the list goes on. Whether youre eating sugar dense carbohydrates like cookies and cakes or your favorite pasta or rice dish, that excess sugar may be affecting your ability to get pregnant. No, that doesnt mean you have to give up all carbohydrates, but there is an important correlation between sugar and infertility and if addressed with a fertility friendly diet can help put you back on track with your pregnancy goals. So, lets take a closer look at just how bad sugar is for your fertility and what you can do about it. I know youve heard it before; carbs are bad for you, no wait, carbs are good for you, no wait! So, which one is it? The truth is there are healthy carbohydrates and there are unhealthy carbohydrates. Healthy carbohydrates are what you get from plant-based foods, including whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans. These foods have a low glycemic effect on blood sugar levels as they are full of the fiber, allowing your body to absorb the nutrients slowly and avoid spikes in blood sugar levels. The bad carbohydrates are what you find in processed foods, including sugar, cereal, white bread (not whole grain bread), white rice, white flour pasta, snack foods, sodas or sugary drinks, and meat foods (chicken nuggets, sausage). These foods all pack a wallop when it comes to sending your blood sugar levels rising (high glycemic effect). Repeated blood sugar level spikes from eating them can st Continue reading >>

Let’s Get Personal: Blood Sugar Control Is Vital And How Lowering Your Carbs Can Boost Fertility

Let’s Get Personal: Blood Sugar Control Is Vital And How Lowering Your Carbs Can Boost Fertility

This is going to be a long post, but I really hope you'll bear with me and read through it. I hope that the information I share will be helpful to at least one person. I am not saying that lowering your carbohydrates is going to magically make you fertile. I'm also not saying that this is the be-all end-all for wellness. What I am saying is that getting your blood sugar under control is the first step that you can take in improving your fertility. To get your blood sugar under control, going low-carb has been proven time and time again to be effective. Nothing in your body can be healed if there are underlying metabolic (i.e. blood sugar) issues. That is a fact. Some people are going to struggle with blood sugar issues for the rest of their lives. In order to control those, they might have to remain low carb. Find what works for you and your body and stick with it. But, don't kid yourself and think that you have nothing to worry about on the blood sugar front. I'd venture to say that almost everyone walking around today has some sort of blood sugar imbalance. Also, I am just sharing my experiences, because I truly believe that by sharing our stories with one another, we can learn and heal. OK. Read on. DISCLAIMER: The content shared on this site is for informational and educational purposes only. Statements/products discussed have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease or illness. Please consult your own certified health care practitioner before making changes to your current diet or before beginning any herbal or vitamin supplement regimen or exercise program. Let's Talk About Blood Sugar So, like I mentioned a couple weeks ago, the reason I have decided to put my health in the Continue reading >>

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