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Blood Sugar After Eating Ice Cream

Ice Cream: Okay For Diabetics?

Ice Cream: Okay For Diabetics?

Expert Q&A I just learned that I am diabetic. Can I still eat ice cream? -Monica from Georgia Even though it is okay for diabetics to eat sweets such as ice cream, I always stress caution, as these foods are usually very high in calories and can wreak havoc on your blood glucose control. Moreover, they add empty calories to your diet and provide little nutritional benefit. With that said, if you decide to eat sugar or sweets, do so carefully. Do not merely add them, plan for them. The best way to do so is by first understanding how your blood sugar levels react to certain sweets. It is also a good idea to take your blood sugars before and after eating them. If you want to have ice cream for dessert, wait 2 hours after dinner, during which time you can go for a walk. Then, check your blood sugars. Take the right amount of insulin or oral medication, and check your blood glucose 2 hours later. If your blood glucose is below 160mg/dl, you body should be able to tolerate a small dessert. Examine the nutritional facts on the carton, focusing on the carbohydrate count. You should aim for no more than 30 grams of carbs, which is usually equal to one-half cup. It is easy to ingest far too many carbohydrates and calories when eating sweets. If you do eat foods that contain sugar, exercise a bit more than you usually do. This will help you burn off the extra calories and decrease the rise in blood sugars. In addition, many sugar-containing foods like ice cream and cookies are high in fat, so seek out low-fat, low-carb options. It may be a good idea to work with an experienced dietitian or diabetes educator to develop a meal plan that is both satisfying and keeps your blood sugars in check. Have a question for our Experts? Send it in! Continue reading >>

How Does Ice Cream Affect Your Glucose Reading?

How Does Ice Cream Affect Your Glucose Reading?

How Does Ice Cream Affect Your Glucose Reading? Larger servings will cause larger increases in blood sugar levels.Photo Credit: margouillatphotos/iStock/Getty Images Although some people think you need to give up all sweet treats if you're diabetic, that isn't necessarily the case. Choosing the right foods and properly planning your carbohydrate intake throughout the day can make it possible to indulge on occasion. While ice cream does contain carbohydrates and can increase your blood sugar levels somewhat, it won't necessarily cause blood sugar spikes. The carbohydrate content of ice cream varies. A 1/2-cup serving of chocolate soft serve or the same amount of fat-free, no-sugar-added ice cream in a flavor other than chocolate each has about 19 grams of carbohydrates. A premium vanilla ice cream, on the other hand, can have as much as 24 grams, and other premium flavors, such as those containing chunks of candy or other sweets, can be even higher in carbohydrates. One serving of carbohydrates for a diabetic is 15 grams, and diabetics can usually eat three to five servings per meal or one to two servings per snack and still maintain relatively stable blood sugar levels. This means a 1/2-cup serving of ice cream can take up half of a meal's carbohydrate servings and could contain more than the amount of carbohydrates allowed in a snack. The glycemic index helps predict how much a particular food is likely to raise blood sugar levels after you eat it. Foods low on the glycemic index with scores of 55 or less don't cause blood sugar levels to increase very much, while those with scores over 76 can cause large increases. Regular half-vanilla, half-chocolate ice cream has a GI of about 57, and low-fat raspberry ripple has a GI of 79. However, some low-fat ice creams have a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Yes, We Can!

Diabetes And Ice Cream: Yes, We Can!

The other day, after a casual dinner at home, my wife and I went out for ice cream. We'd opted to leave the air-conditioned safety of our home on this 90+ degree day, to head for an ice cream parlor that's just a short stroll from our house. As we stood there pondering the particular ice cream creations that sounded best, I glanced at my Dexcom CGM to see where my blood sugar happened to be and what that would mean for my carb counting and insulin dosing. Seeing a 97 mg/dL on my receiver, I smiled and rattled off the number to my wife who had already moved toward the counter to tell the clerk her decision. I rarely deviate from choosing either a plain scoop of vanilla, or an 'unfancy' single-scoop hot fudge sundae. But in this moment, I decided to go with a single scoop of rocky road, full of chocolatey goodness and riddled with marshmallows and nuts. I was treating myself, after all. A woman nearby had apparently overheard the first part of our conversation and realized I was talking about diabetes. She shot me a look before saying, "You can't eat that!" Without more than a second's hesitation, I shot back a quick, decisive response: "Yes, I can!" That started a back and forth that I would have preferred to avoid, about how this woman was nosing in on a private matter that didn't concern her -- one that she also had no personal insight into and no context as to who I was or how I was managing my diabetes and this particular food choice. It wasn't any of her business in the first place of course, but still she insisted that she knows a lot about diabetes and what PWDs can or cannot eat, since she has family members who happen to live with it. (((sigh))) We in the Diabetes Community know this type of person well. They're referred to as the Diabetes Police, who think they Continue reading >>

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Ice Cream For Type 2 Diabetes

Ice cream does not have to be strictly off limits for people with type 2 diabetes. While it is still best to enjoy ice cream in moderation, there are ice cream and frozen yogurt choices out there that will not derail a healthful diet. People with type 2 diabetes have more to think about than simply ruining their diet with ice cream. Their main concerns are about how ice cream will affect their blood sugar levels, since controlling this is critical to managing diabetes. While people with diabetes can include ice cream as part of their healthful diet, it is important for them to make informed decisions about what ice creams they should eat. Understanding ice cream sugar servings Most ice cream has a lot of added sugar, making it something a person with diabetes should avoid. Because of this, one of the first things they should consider when choosing an ice cream is the sugar content. People with diabetes need to understand how their ice cream indulgence fits into their overall diet plan. Here are a few facts for people with diabetes to consider: Every 4 grams (g) of sugar is equivalent to 1 teaspoon. The more sugar that is in the ice cream, the more carbohydrates it has. An ice cream serving with 15 g of carbohydrates is equal to 1 serving of carbohydrates. Any carbohydrates in ice cream will count towards the total carbohydrate goal for the day, which will be different for each person. Protein and fat found in ice cream can help slow absorption of sugar. Choosing an ice cream higher in protein and fat may be preferable to choosing a lower fat option. A suitable portion of ice cream for somebody with diabetes is very small, usually half a cup. But most people serve much more than this. It is crucial that a person with diabetes sticks to the proper portion size, so they kn Continue reading >>

The Latest ‘scoop’ On Ice Cream

The Latest ‘scoop’ On Ice Cream

Originally ice cream consisted of milk, cream, sugar, flavoring and lots of air. But modern brands adhering to this original recipe are few and far between. Today, the “cream” in ice cream is often taken out to produce “heart-healthy” and “reduced-fat” products. Soy milk sometimes replaces both cream and milk. Air is reduced to make way for an excess of denser, richer desserts packed with high-quality ingredients. In addition, stabilizers, emulsifiers and other ingredients are mixed in to titillate our taste buds and trick us into believing we’re getting the real deal. At What Cost to Diabetes Control? Stable blood-glucose levels depend not only on what is eaten but also on when the food reaches the bloodstream. These new ice cream additions—or subtractions—can affect your blood-glucose levels. You need to read and understand ice cream labels. Know how the ingredients affect you individually so that you can choose wisely. You should ask yourself several questions before an ice cream indulgence: Does the ice cream contain sucrose (table sugar)? Does the formulation contain cellulose fibers or gums such as carageenan, which slow absorption? How well do you digest fat? Fat slows the digestive process. Thus fat-free iced products can dump carbohydrates into the bloodstream quickly. Depending on the type of carbohydrate available, your blood glucose can spike rapidly. If fat-free products cause high blood glucose, they may not be a valid “happy heart” alternative. Sweeteners also affect blood glucose. Many different types of sweetening agents are used in frozen desserts—sometimes in combination. Aspartame does not raise blood glucose, but be careful when you read labeling; “sugar-free” might simply mean that no sucrose has been added to the ice cr Continue reading >>

Ice Cream Give You High Blood Sugar 3+ Hours After Eating?

Ice Cream Give You High Blood Sugar 3+ Hours After Eating?

ice cream give you high blood sugar 3+ hours after eating? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. ice cream give you high blood sugar 3+ hours after eating? has anyone else experienced this isseue? my endocrinologist warned me about it, but i never really noticed the pattern until recently. My blood sugar is great premeal, 1hr and 2hrs+ post prandial, but hour 3.5 hits and the sugar starts a risin'. I can't simply think it's a coincidence that in these situations, i had about 1/2 cup-1 cup of ice cream as a special [and infrequent!] dessert treat...bad mistake. 3+ hours after eating and maintaining perfect blood sugars, my numbers start to creep up and then rise by leaps and bounds. at 3+ hrs post-prandial, i was at 133 so i took an extra bolus on my pump (because i was clearly on the rise). about 20-30 minutes later i was at 175 and 20+ min after that i was at 245!!! took more insulin and wouldn't you know it, i'm still in the weeds at 227. I'm on my way down, thank god, (had gone up as far as 252) but what is this thing with ice cream? i heard it was the fat that slows absorption and then causes a rise, but can anyone offer any additional info? What you had heard sounds correct to me. The fat slows the absorption of the sugars, but once the fat has been dealt with, the sugar shows itself more aggressively, if that makes sense. It's not just ice cream that does this... if I eat like I used to do regularly, and have chicken tenders and fries for dinner Friday night, my bedtime bg will look okay, but my morning numbers can be as much as 20 points higher than normal, in my experience. If I did this more often, I imagine this effect Continue reading >>

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

If only you could feel like Superman all day…alert, energetic, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound…. How do we often try to feel like Superman? By drinking energy drinks, multiple cups of coffee, a few donuts and other high-glycemic or caffeinated fixes. For the first few minutes after consuming a sugary or chemical-buzz inducing treat, we fleetingly feel like a superhero. How quickly, though, we come crashing back down to Earth as our blood sugar levels, after skyrocketing, fueling the brief energy burst, then plummets, making us feel tired and cranky. Our brains are wired and conditioned by habit to be rewarded by sweet treats. The reward mechanism wired in our brain tells us that we will feel great after eating a pint of ice cream. Despite knowing--maybe sometimes denying--the fact that within an hour or two after eating the excess ice cream, an energy crash will occur, some of us continue to fall prey to the sugar. For the over 25 million adults and children in the U.S. who have diabetes--and the approximately 80 million who are pre-diabetic and might not even know it--regularly monitoring blood sugar levels can help manage and even improve diabetes. How can you tell if you should get a blood sugar test? If you’ve never had a diagnostic test--fasting blood sugar level test; oral glucose tolerance test; IV glucose tolerance test; random blood-sugar test; or home testing with a glucometer--if you frequently experience the following, you should have a blood sugar test performed by a medical professional: --mood swings --energy crashes --insatiable hunger --bingeing late at night --low energy in the morning --worsening vision --foot pain or numbness Different factors play a part in determining an individual’s proper blood sugar levels, such as genetics Continue reading >>

How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Thinkstock Q: How long after eating does food affect your blood sugar? When is the best time to test my blood sugar in relation to meals? A: Food is the number one reason for fluctuations in blood sugar, or glucose. Usually, food raises blood sugar while alcohol may lower blood sugar. Depending on what you are eating, blood sugar can rise beyond 300 mg/dl if the food contains sugar or simple carbohydrates. For example, milk and juices are used medically to correct hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, because they can quickly raise sugars after only drinking 3 to 4 ounces. If you are curious about what a particular food or a meal does to your blood sugar, check your glucose level just before you eat, and then check it again two hours after finishing your meal. The American Diabetes Association recommends that a safe postprandial sugar level should not exceed 180 mg/dl. If the sugar is higher than 180 mg/dl and you are taking insulin or medication, you may need to take a higher dose before eating that same meal again or adjust the meal — either by eating less or reducing the carb content. For people diagnosed with diabetes, it’s very easy to become obsessive about blood sugars and be tempted to check them multiple times throughout the day. But that’s usually not necessary. For example, someone who takes short- or rapid-acting insulin before meals should check sugars before each meal to decide how much to take, and then again at bedtime, which will help their healthcare provider know whether to adjust the daily dose of long-acting insulin. When monitoring blood sugar around meals, remember to check it right before the meal and then two hours after eating. Almost everyone — with or without diabetes — may have a high blood sugar while eating or right afterwards, which Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Long Island, New York, USA: I am not sure what to do next with my two and a half-year-old daughter. About a week ago, she spent the day urinating in her pants, every 15 to 20 minutes. She is toilet trained so I just thought she was regressing. Then, two days later, it started again and even the babysitter observed it, frequent urination in potty and/or in her pants. My friend, who's young daughter has type 1, came over and tested her. My daughter's blood sugar was 315 mg/dl [17.5 mmol/L], although she had eaten a bowl of ice cream 20 minutes earlier. Forty-five minutes after the ice cream she was 285 mg/dl [15.8 mmol/L]. By the time we got to the doctor's office, her blood sugar was down to 145 mg/dl [8.0 mmol/L]. He sent us to Emergency Room where her blood sugar was normal. By then, she had not eaten for six or seven hours. I fed her turkey, cheese and pudding. She ate and the doctor said to go home. I asked for one more check before we left and she was 155 mg/dl [8.5 mmol/L], about 25 or 30 minutes after eating. The doctor was cautious but sent us home. The next day, upon waking, my daughter's blood sugar was 185 mg/dl [10.3 mmol/L]. One hour after eating cereal, it was 211 mg/dl [11.7 mmol/L]. Later in the day, after an apple and some hot chocolate, she was 173 mg/dl [9.6 mmol/L]. That night she was VERY hungry and ate spaghetti. Afterwards, she was 109 mg/dl [6.1 mmol/L]. She went to bed, but woke up vomiting at midnight. She was 132 mg/dl [7.3 mmol/L] at that time. She vomited all night and her numbers went up to 142 mg/dl [7.9 mmol/L] and 207 mg/dl [11.5 mmol/L]. By 8:00 a.m., she was 122 mg/dl [6.8 mmol/L] with no food in her belly since 6:30 p.m. the night before. At 2:00 p.m., she was 84 mg/dl [4.7 mmol/L], still no food. Two hours later, she ha Continue reading >>

Strike The Spike Ii

Strike The Spike Ii

Dealing With High Blood Sugar After Meals Eleven years ago, I wrote an article for Diabetes Self-Management about the management of high blood sugar after meals. It was called “Strike the Spike” and no article I’ve ever written has led to greater reader response. To this day, I still receive calls, letters, and e-mails thanking me for offering practical answers to this perplexing challenge. I’ve even been asked to speak on the topic at some major conferences. So when presented with the opportunity to readdress the issue, I jumped at the chance. A lot has changed in the past eleven years: we know more than ever about the harmful effects of after-meal blood sugar spikes, but we also have a number of potent new tools and techniques for preventing them. Now that I know how important this topic is to so many people, I’ll do my absolute best to bring you up to date. What’s a spike? After-meal, or “postprandial,” spikes are temporary high blood glucose levels that occur soon after eating. It is normal for the level of glucose in the blood to rise a small amount after eating, even in people who do not have diabetes. However, if the rise is too high, it can affect your quality of life today and contribute to serious health problems down the road. The reason blood glucose tends to spike after eating in many people with diabetes is a simple matter of timing. In a person who doesn’t have diabetes, eating foods containing carbohydrate causes two important reactions in the pancreas: the immediate release of insulin into the bloodstream, and the release of a hormone called amylin. The insulin starts working almost immediately (to move glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells) and finishes its job in a matter of minutes. The amylin keeps food from reaching the sm Continue reading >>

The 5 Most Common Party Foods And What It Means For Blood Sugar Management

The 5 Most Common Party Foods And What It Means For Blood Sugar Management

Note: This is part of our library of resources on Food. Learn more about dietary recommendations from nutritionists and foodies alike on our Food page! From the birthday party to the end-of-school-year pizza party, these celebratory events often come with a selection of food that is not always the healthiest. While having Type 1 diabetes does not exclude you from eating a confetti-covered cupcake or that slice of pizza that is the staple of most school gatherings; it does mean however that you’ll be presented with foods that can make managing T1D all that more challenging. We wanted to know how these five common party foods affect BGLs, so we looked at the daily nutritional value closely of the following foods: 1 frosted vanilla cupcake 1 slice of traditional pizza 1 scoop of Baskin Robin’s chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream 1 can of Sprite soda an individual bag of Lay’s original potato chips compared to 1 serving of raw carrots We found that these typical party foods can make managing Type 1 (or Type 2) diabetes more difficult because of the high amounts of the following ingredients: Sodium Saturated fats LDL Cholesterol Refined sugars Carbohydrates That is not to say, if you have Type 1 you should only eat raw veggies, while the others enjoy the common treats. You should, however, be aware of what these typical snacks do to blood sugar and why. Knowing more about how food affects physiology will aid you in adjusting insulin and help you prepare for optimal blood sugar control. Sodium Most commonly found in the form of sodium chloride or “table salt,” this element is crucial for bodily functions. The NIH explains that “The body uses sodium to control blood pressure and blood volume. Your body also needs sodium for your muscles and nerves to work properl Continue reading >>

Ice Cream Trick! - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Ice Cream Trick! - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

I am new here and I'm reading that a lot of women are eating ice cream before bed to keep their fasting number down. Can someone give me a little more detail? How much ice cream? What kind? How late at night do you eat it? I've been eating pretty well and can't get my morning blood sugar below 104. Any tips would be appreciated! Lately I've been eating neopolitan ice cream at night, usually a cup or so as it doesn't hurt my fasting number. I'll eat it around 8-9pm, take my fasting number anywhere from 4-7 hrs later (my sleep is really messed up, so hard to find consistency). You might have to experiment a bit. If your numbers are high no matter what you do then it might be an indicator that you'll need insulin. I've had carb smart ice cream bars (just 1) paired with some protein like special k protein bites or string cheese. I've also had the weight watchers ice cream bars. I normally have my snack around 9 9:30pm and test exactly 10 hours later and my numbers are below 90. I've been wondering about this too! Not bc my fasting is high but bc I really want ice cream! I just had half a cup of bryers immediately after dinner. Staying within my allotted dinner carbs. Will update in 2 hours! Wish me luck. I had ice cream as my snack with my first GD pregnancy and never had a high fasting number. This time around, i weigh more so am trying to minimize weight gain so I switched to yogurt. It's siggi's brand. 14 or so grams of carbs and 15 grams of protein. My fasting has been around 80 every time I've eaten it. I ate full fat ice cream and mixed in peanut butter almost every night when I was pregnant. I started with 1/2 cup serving, but then got more relaxed about the amount still with good numbers! The only way you'll know if it works is to try it! I also can't get my fastin Continue reading >>

Ice Cream Night Before Glucose Test?

Ice Cream Night Before Glucose Test?

Tomorrow (9 a.m.) I am taking the one-hour glucose test. My husband wants to get ice cream with some friends after church (8-9 p.m. or so). Would that affect the results in the morning? I plan on fasting after that. @nooneinparticular I had ice cream last night and did my test this morning. I guess we'll see :) @nooneinparticular I had mine today and I had a bunch of juice and some Mcdonalds last night. When I got up this morning I had an egg and cheese bagel with water to drink. That was 3 hours before my test and I passed it. The nurse saidI passed it fine. I was only told to fast for 2 hours prior to my 1 hour test. @nooneinparticular My doc said no eating within the two hours before the test, so anything before that is fine. @nooneinparticular Ihad a huge double dip cone the night before mine and I still passed! I brought my toddler with me to the lab and we walked around which may have helped to burn the sugar. In my previous pregnancy I failed the 1 hour and passed the 3 hour. I was so relieved to have passed the 1 hour this time around. @nooneinparticular Eat normally. The point is not passing or failing, it is determining if your normal diet and resulting blood sugar issues warrant further monitoring. I don't get the people who adjust their diet prior to taking the test. I had a bowl of ice cream before my test.. As well as some eggs&bacon with syrup!! You will be fine having it tonight! Oh and I did pass mine as well! The night before I had a bowl of mini wheat cereal which has sugar on it. And the morning of I had an egg and cheese sandwich on whole wheat muffins. I passed. dr told me not to fast and you can eat that day just nothing sugary @nooneinparticular I had some the night before my test and failed with a 145. If I could go back in time I wouldn't have Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating with Diabetes: Desserts and Sweets By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 11/22/2010 Id be willing to bet that most everyone has been toldand therefore believesthat people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. Its best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you dont miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan . The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same a Continue reading >>

7 Techniques To Reduce Post-meal Spikes During Pregnancy

7 Techniques To Reduce Post-meal Spikes During Pregnancy

“Gary, I think I need more insulin at breakfast.” “Why do you say that, Julianne?” “Because I’m always having high readings right afterwards, and my obstetrician said I shouldn’t spike after I eat.” “And what happens after the spike?” “It usually comes down to normal before lunch. So do you think I should take more insulin?” After-meal blood sugar spikes can create quite a quandary for anyone with diabetes, particularly during pregnancy. Research has shown that fetal macrosomia (overgrowth of the baby) becomes more common when post-meal blood sugars exceed 120 mg/dl (6.7 mmol). With post-meal readings above 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol), the risk more than doubles from baseline. Fetal macrosomia can cause many problems during pregnancy. When the baby grows and develops too rapidly, it can lead to a premature and more complicated birth. It may also cause injuries to occur to the baby during delivery. Why do after-meal blood sugars have such a major influence on the baby’s growth? Nobody knows for certain. Perhaps, when the mother’s blood sugar “spikes” suddenly after meals, the baby is fed more sugar than its pancreas can “cover” with insulin, and high fetal blood sugar results. And because the baby’s kidneys spill almost all excess sugar from the baby’s bloodstream back into the amniotic fluid, the baby then drinks in the extra glucose and winds up growing more than it should. Suffice to say that post-meal blood sugar spikes are something to avoid during pregnancy. But how do we do it? Getting back to Julianne’s question, if she takes more insulin, she’ll probably wind up hypoglycemic before lunch. Luckily, we have some excellent techniques for preventing the after-meal highs without having to take more mealtime insulin. What Causes Sp Continue reading >>

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