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Blood Sugar After Coke

This Is What Happens To Your Body When You Drink Coca Cola

This Is What Happens To Your Body When You Drink Coca Cola

This is what happens to your body when you drink Coca Cola A new infographic reveals exactly what happens when fizzy drinks enter your system What happens to your body when you enjoy a fizzy drink?Photo: ALAMY We all know fizzy drinks like Coca Cola are loaded with sugar , but do you really know what happens to your body when you glug a can of the sweet stuff? An infographic which reveals the disturbing effect Coke has within an hour of entering your system has gone viral. Based on research by health writer Wade Meredith , it explains that a 330ml can of Coca Cola contains so much sugar, your body should vomit - but the phosphoric acid "cuts the flavor", helping you keep the liquid down. After 40 minutes, your blood sugar has spiked, your pupils dilated, and your blood pressure has risen. The body starts to produce more dopamine, a neurotransmitter that controls the brain's pleasure centres - "physically the same way heroin works, by the way". By the time the hour is up, you will want to urinate, and start to have a sugar crash, making you drowsy and irritable. "Youve also now, literally, p***** away all the water that was in the Coke. But not before infusing it with valuable nutrients your body could have used for things like hydrating your system, or building strong bones and teeth," the account concludes. The infographic's creator, former UK pharmarcist Niraj Naik, says that this pattern "applies to pretty much most caffeinated soft drinks, not just Coke. "If you care about your heart, health and mind then please remember this article next time you reach for that bottle." A Coca-Cola spokesperson said: People have enjoyed drinking a Coca-Cola for more than 129 years. Like all soft drinks, it is perfectly safe to drink and can be enjoyed as part of a balanced diet an Continue reading >>

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

What Everyone Must Know About Coke Zero And Diabetes

If you have diabetes you may be thinking quitting your regular Coke and opting for Coke Zero is going to do you a big favor. After all, it's sugar free and therefore healthier, right? Wrong! Once you read this, you'll understand that the scientific research shows quite the opposite. What is Coke Zero? Coke Zero was launched in 2005 as a sugar free, low calorie alternative to regular coke. One thing that's quite funny is that while Diet Coke has been around since the 1980’s, many men thought the title “diet” sounded a little too feminine and they weren’t interested in buying it. So as a result, Coke Zero was born. It was marketed mostly towards men who wanted to enjoy the taste of a classic Coke with zero guilt. Coke Zero comes in several different flavors, including classic, vanilla, and cherry. You might be thinking that a sugar free soda sounds too good to be true. And you would be right! Unfortunately, Coke Zero and other sugar free sodas are not a soda lover’s dream come true. And you'll soon see why… Nutrition Facts You probably already know that regular soda has a ton of sugar in it, which means you should steer clear of it at all costs – diabetic or not. For example, a 12 ounce can of regular Coke contains 39 grams of sugar, all derived from high fructose corn syrup, which makes that a double no, no. That can of soda also packs 140 empty calories – meaning, you don’t get any nutrients from it. It’s easy to see why so many people were thrilled when diet sodas hit the market. After all, the promise of cutting down on sugar to lose weight, and reduce your risk of obesity and diabetes – that sounds like a good deal, right? Well, unfortunately those promises aren't all they're cracked up to be. The sweetener in Diet Coke is called ‘aspartame,' Continue reading >>

What A Can Of Coca-cola Really Does To Your Body

What A Can Of Coca-cola Really Does To Your Body

Home / Resources / Articles / What A Can of Coca-Cola Really Does To Your Body What A Can of Coca-Cola Really Does To Your Body Soda stimulates the brains reward and pleasure centers similarly to heroin. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the recommended daily allowance for sugar consumption is no more than 6 teaspoons per a day. A 12-oz can of Coca-Cola contains about 10 teaspoon of sugar. The high amounts of fructose corn syrup, refined salts, and caffeine found in soda contributes to high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity when regularly consumed. Those who drink 1-2 cans of sugary beverages a day are 26% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Within 20 minutes of consuming a 12-oz can of Coca-Cola, blood sugar levels spike, which causes a burst of insulin release. Caffeine absorption is complete after 40 minutes causing blood pressure to rise and adenosine receptors in the brain to be blocked, which prevents drowsiness. Dopamine production is increased after 45 minutes of consumption to stimulate the reward and pleasure center of the brain, similarly to how heroin works. The phosphoric acid, which masks the sweetness of the soda, also binds to calcium, magnesium, and zinc, preventing them from being absorbed and utilized for processes such as bone growth. After an hour, the diuretic effects of caffeine kicks in causing urinary excretion of the bonded calcium, magnesium, and zinc, as well as sodium, electrolyte, and water. Finally, a sugar crash occurs, causing irritability and drowsiness. This process occurs not only for Coca-Cola, but for all caffeinated carbonated beverages. However, this does not mean that soda should be completely banned from your diet. Soda consumption will not do any major harm in small amounts when part of a balanced diet a Continue reading >>

What A Can Of Coke Does To Your Body | Diabetic Connect

What A Can Of Coke Does To Your Body | Diabetic Connect

Open happiness is the slogan of the worlds beloved Coca-Cola drink, but perhaps what it really should say is Open diabetes/obesity/heart disease. The CEO of fitness company CrossFit came under fire from some in the diabetes community for his tweet saying just that: open diabetes. But while his message may have been tactless, there is, in fact ,some truth to this statement. A 2010 study published in Diabetes Care found that people who drank one to two cans of sugary beverages a day were 26 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who drank them on occasion. Drinking Coke may also lead to heart disease: a 2012 study published in the journal Circulation observed 40,000 men for two decades and found that those who had one can of a sugary drink (like Coke) per day were 20 percent more likely to experience or die from a heart attack compared to those who didnt. Another study found similar results in women. Its worth noting, however, that these studies were designed to reveal links between health hazards and sweetened drinks, but they do not prove cause and effect. Coke and other sugary soda drinks may also be major factors that lead to obesity. A campaign to highlight the effects of soda beverages like Coca-Colacalled The Real Bears , as a slam against the Coke polar bear adsclaimed that sugary drinks are the biggest source of calories in the American diet. Dr. Frank Hu, professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, argues that theres sufficient scientific evidence to prove that decreasing sugary drink consumption will reduce obesity and obesity-related diseases in the U.S. population. Sugary drinks are also believed to increase our risk for gout, which is a particularly painful form of arthritis. All in all, there is ample evid Continue reading >>

Cocaine And Diabetes

Cocaine And Diabetes

Tweet Cocaine is a powerful, harmful and addictive drug that is derived from the leaves of the coca shrub. It usually comes as a white crystalline powder (coke), but is also commonly supplied as ‘freebase’ cocaine (powder cocaine that’s been prepared for smoking) and ‘crack’ (a small rock-like form of cocaine that makes a cracking noise when burnt), which are both usually smoked in a glass tube, plastic bottle or in foil. Each of these forms has a potent, short-lived impact on both the mind and body. However, both freebase and crack tend to have a stronger effect and be more addictive as they affect the brain much quicker than snorted powder cocaine. Drug class Cocaine in all its forms is categorised as a Class A drug in the UK. If caught in possession of the drug by the police, you could be arrested, taken to court and given a prison sentence of up to seven years. If caught supplying the drug, you could face life in jail and receive an unlimited fine. In addition, it is illegal and very dangerous to drive whilst high on cocaine (as with all recreational drugs) or allow other people use cocaine in your house or any other premises. Effects on the body People who take cocaine generally report feeling very confident, wide-awake and on top of the world. However, some people can easily become over-confident, arrogant and aggressive towards others, including their friends. Like all stimulants (or ‘uppers’), cocaine also: Reduces appetite Increases body temperature Makes the heart beat faster Can cause dehydration, especially if used when partying or clubbing The effects of cocaine tend to only last for around 20-30 minutes (10 minutes for crack or freebase), and once they begin to wear off, users suffer a long ‘comedown’ which can make them feel tired, bad-t Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From The Netherlands: My boyfriend's son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about three months ago. I always do my best to give him healthy food and try to avoid sugary drinks as much as possible. My boyfriend, however, thinks a little differently about it and says that, for example, Coca Cola doesn't harm his son's health that much. He believes that because Coca Cola makes your blood sugar rise quickly, it also disappears quickly from your body. I don't agree with that statement. I've been trying to find the explanation of what really happens with the blood sugar after drinking a regular Coca Cola and what the consequences are of drinking it, but I can't find anything that goes deeper than it makes your blood sugar rise fast and that's bad for you weight. Does is make a difference if you mix a sugar soft drink with a healthy food? Can you explain it in details and be specific as much as possible? Answer: It is important for everyone to eat healthy foods and to enjoy their food. For a person with type 1 diabetes, balancing nutritious foods and glucose control is an art and a science. Take time to learn about how different foods affect glucose and make an informed decision. For example, carbohydrates have the biggest effect on glucose levels for people with type 1 diabetes. Tools such as blood glucose monitoring and continuous glucose monitoring will help you understand the affect of the foods eaten on glucose levels. (Know that in the first months of diabetes, he may still be making some insulin, which would affect the impact of foods on glucose). In my experience, most people with type 1 diabetes typically decide to limit their regular soda to periods of hypoglycemia or to prevent hypoglycemia related to exercise, as regular soda may cause a significant rise Continue reading >>

What Happens One Hour After Drinking A Can Of Coke - The Renegade Pharmacist

What Happens One Hour After Drinking A Can Of Coke - The Renegade Pharmacist

What Happens One Hour After Drinking A Can Of Coke Something that I noticed when working as a pharmacist was why people would still gain weight even though they were following a strict low fat diet recommended to them by their doctor. This made me question whether it is really the fat that causes us to gain unhealthy weight. After seeing so many people suffering from obesity related diseases like heart disease, diabetes and the side effects of the medication they were taking, I was strongly motivated to research what actually causes people to become obese, it clearly was not just the fat they were eating! I actually discovered that a trigger factor for many widespread diseases of the west such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes could be closely linked to the consumption of one particular substance found in many processed foods and drinks fructose in the form of high fructose corn syrup. Fructose is the form of high fructose corn syrup found in pretty much all processed foods such as ready meals, fast foods, sweets and fizzy drinks and most people are totally unaware of its danger. It is also often found in low fat supposedly healthy alternatives and even many popular weight loss products because food with the fat taken out simply tastes horrible. High fructose corn syrup in combination with many other additives are usually added to enhance the flavor. Glucose is the type of sugar our body loves. It gets metabolized by every cell in our body and is very easy to burn with very few toxic by-products. It also tells the brain to stop eating when you are full. Fructose on the other hand is another type of sugar and is found in sucrose which breaks down to glucose and fructose. Fructose is actually only metabolized by the liver and its very similar to ethanol (the alcohol Continue reading >>

What Happens To Your Body Within An Hour Of Drinking A Coke

What Happens To Your Body Within An Hour Of Drinking A Coke

What Happens to Your Body Within an Hour of Drinking a Coke Do you want to be healthy? Drinking soda is bad for your health in so many ways; science cant even state all the consequences. Heres what happens in your body when you assault it with a Coke: Within the first 10 minutes, 10 teaspoons of sugar hit your system. This is 100 percent of your recommended daily intake, and the only reason you dont vomit as a result of the overwhelming sweetness is because phosphoric acid cuts the flavor. Within 20 minutes, your blood sugar spikes, and your liver responds to the resulting insulin burst by turning massive amounts of sugar into fat. Within 40 minutes, caffeine absorption is complete; your pupils dilate, your blood pressure rises, and your livers dumps more sugar into your bloodstream. Around 45 minutes, your body increases dopamine production, which stimulates the pleasure centers of your brain a physically identical response to that of heroin, by the way. After 60 minutes, youll start to have a sugar crash. How many sodas have you had today? How about your kids? As of 2005, white bread was dethroned as the number one source of calories in the American diet, being replaced by soft drinks. The average American drinks more than 60 gallons of soft drinks each year, but before you grab that next can of soda, consider this: one can of soda has about 10 teaspoons of sugar, 150 calories, 30 to 55 mg of caffeine, and is loaded with artificial food colors and sulphites. Not to mention the fact that its also your largest source of dangerous high-fructose modified corn syrup . Lets take a look at some of the other major components of a can of soda: Phosphoric Acid: Which can interfere with the body's ability to use calcium, leading to osteoporosis or softening of the teeth and bon Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 911

Blood Sugar 911

CBN.com - After experiencing periods of increased jittery nerves, violent trembling, and fainting – all signs of severely low blood sugar – author Dennis Pollock was on a mission to change his diet. Christmas Scare It should have been a pleasant night. It was the Christmas season, and we had just returned from our annual Christmas trip to Grandma’s house. We were sitting in our living room, watching a videotape that was one of my sons’ Christmas presents. I wasn’t having fun. It was happening again. Less than three hours after we had eaten supper I could feel that cold chill on my arms and those jittery telltale indicators that my blood-sugar levels were falling way too low. I quietly slipped out of the room and went into the bathroom to check my blood sugar with my glucometer—a device I had been totally ignorant of a year earlier but was now all too familiar with. As I suspected, my blood-sugar level was dangerously low, so low I knew I needed to take action fast. Grabbing a can of Coke, I drank the entire contents in under a minute. Now my blood sugar went the other way. Another test revealed the level had gone from 40 mg/dl to about 170 in a very short time. 1 (The normal range is 80 to 120.) My body began to tremble violently. I tried to go back into the living room and watch the movie, hoping no one would notice the trembling, but I realized the shaking wasn’t going to go away very soon. I slipped into the bedroom, put on a music CD, and got under the covers. As I trembled and shook, I could only think, What in the world is wrong with me? Looking Back The Christmas scare was not my first encounter with blood-sugar problems. As I look back over my life now, I realize I have had blood-sugar issues going back to the mid-1980s. In the early days I could n Continue reading >>

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Drug And Alcohol Use With Diabetes

Comprehensive Guide to Research on Risk, Complications and Treatment Substance abuse is described as the excessive use of a substance such as alcohol or drugs that results in significant clinical impairments as well as the loss of ability to function academically, professionally, and socially [1]. An individual who was healthy before the substance abuse began will typically begin to experience serious health problems over time, but extensive damage may be avoided or reversed if effective substance abuse treatment is received. This is not the case, however, for individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes, and although this is a manageable disease with proper treatment, substance abuse may cause it to become life-threatening. This guide will discuss, in detail, how substance abuse can negatively impact the life and health of a person with diabetes. Diabetes, also referred to as diabetes mellitus, is a condition in which the body is unable to properly regulate blood sugar levels. There are two forms known as type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but in order to better understand the difference between the two types, the role that insulin plays in the regulation of healthy blood sugar levels will be briefly described. During the digestive process, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar that easily enters the bloodstream and is used by the body for energy. The pancreas normally responds to increasing blood sugar levels by initiating the production of the hormone known as insulin. As insulin levels increase, it signals the transfer of glucose into cells throughout the body and it also ensures that excess glucose will be stored in the liver in order to prevent high blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes, which is also called juvenile or insulin dependent Continue reading >>

Does Coke Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Coke Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

seith24 over a year ago Hi, you can have diet coke, as it contains sweetener saccharine. Try to drink caffeine free Cola, as it will not affect your blood pressure. Also, you can try natural fruit juices which are not carbonated and they contain natural vitamins and other ingredients. If you want to avoid sweeteners as well, you will have to prepare juices yourself. Coca Cola has been changing over time the sweetener it uses in Diet Coke. From aspartame, then saccharin and aspartame, now they're talking about putting sucralose in it. sherman363179845 over a year ago Hello, A higher blood sugar level is not the only risk that comes with most soft drinks, especially non-diet cola. Colas also contain caffeine which has a big impact on your heart rate, specifically; larger doses of caffeine can make your heart beat irregularly or faster. Still, definitely the biggest downside of soft drinks is that they do contain a large amount of sugar that tends to get into your bloodstream fairly easy – and that is what can lead to a sudden increase of your blood sugar level. Most people don’t have major problems with sugar that comes from sodas, as long as they drink them moderately. However, diabetics and people who might experience problems because of the caffeine definitely have to stay away from colas and other soft drinks. Continue reading >>

Graphic Shows What Happens To Persons Body After Drinking Can Of Coke Cbs Atlanta

Graphic Shows What Happens To Persons Body After Drinking Can Of Coke Cbs Atlanta

File photo of Coca-Cola cans. (credit: PRAKASH SINGH/AFP/Getty Images) [tweetwidth=330] ATLANTA (CBS Atlanta) A graphic that reportedly breaks down the effects a can of Coca-Cola has on a persons body is going viral. The graphic titled What Happens One Hour After Drinking A Can Of Coke was first posted by The Renegade Pharmacist . The graphic claims to detailwhat happens to the body after 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 40 minutes, 45 minutes and 60 minutes. 1. In The First 10 minutes: 10 teaspoons of sugar hit your system. (100% of your recommended daily intake.) You dont immediately vomit from the overwhelming sweetness because phosphoric acid cuts the flavor allowing you to keep it down. 2. 20 minutes: Your blood sugar spikes, causing an insulin burst. Your liver responds to this by turning any sugar it can get its hands on into fat. (Theres plenty of that at this particular moment.) 3. 40 minutes: Caffeine absorption is complete. Your pupils dilate, your blood pressure rises, as a response your livers dumps more sugar into your bloodstream. The adenosine receptors in your brain are now blocked preventing drowsiness. 4. 45 minutes: Your body ups your dopamine production stimulating the pleasure centers of your brain. This is physically the same way heroin works, by the way. 5. 60 minutes: The phosphoric acid binds calcium, magnesium and zinc in your lower intestine, providing a further boost in metabolism. This is compounded by high doses of sugar and artificial sweeteners also increasing the urinary excretion of calcium. 6. >60 Minutes: The caffeines diuretic properties come into play. (It makes you have to pee.) It is now assured that youll evacuate the bonded calcium, magnesium and zinc that was headed to your bones as well as sodium, electrolyte and water. 7. >60 minute Continue reading >>

Sugar In Soft Drinks And Sodas - Sugary Drinks, Hypos & Diabetes Risk

Sugar In Soft Drinks And Sodas - Sugary Drinks, Hypos & Diabetes Risk

Sugary drinks have been linked with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes Sugary soft drinks, sometimes referred in common usage as full fat drinks, have frequently been linked with poorer health if consumed on a regular basis. Large scale research indicates that regular consumption of sugary drinks, including cola, lemonade and energy drinks, raises the risks of obesity , heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Generally speaking, sugary soft drinks are best avoided by people with diabetes and consumed less regularly by people at a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Recommended daily sugar intakes in the UK The Department of Health recommends that not more than 10% of energy each day comes from sugars. This equates to 70g or less of sugar for men and 50g or less for women. A half litre bottle of a sweetened drink, such as cola, contributes around 60% of the recommended maximum sugar intake. There is no specific recommended sugar intake for people with diabetes, but most people will find they need to limit their sugar intake to considerably less than the Department of Health recommendation to ensure good blood glucose control . Sweetened, sugary drinks can cause sharp rises in blood sugar levels for people with diabetes or glucose intolerance (including prediabetes and gestational diabetes) and so its usually best to avoid drinking sugary drinks. One time when sugary can be useful, however, for people with diabetes is if the persons blood glucose levels go too low ( hypoglycemia ). If a person is on certain forms of diabetic medication (notably insulin ), hypoglycemia can become a particularly dangerous condition. Sugary drinks help to raise blood sugar levels quickly and therefore make for a good treatment for low blood sugar levels. Between 100 and 150ml of a sugary drink suc Continue reading >>

Random Glucose Of 140 After Drinking Sodas

Random Glucose Of 140 After Drinking Sodas

Random glucose of 140 after drinking sodas Random glucose of 140 after drinking sodas I keep a record of all my blood test results....Since around 2000, had about 9 fasting glucose tests, and my fasting range is between 75-85.. Recently went to ER w/palpitations, and they did some blood work and a random glucose came back at 140...Now, i do drink alot of sodas, probably 8 cans a day...Been doing this about 20 years, but my I'm in a good weight range, at 5"10, 153lbs...And i recall having a few cookies before i went to ER, so i had good bit of sugar in system before this glucose was taken...There were no heart issues in the ER, but i do have anxiety issues...In the ER, chest X ray was fine, EKG revealed sinus tachycardia with no other abnormailites, and blood work was good, except for glucose...Actually, they didn't even tell me the glucose #, i didn't see the ER report until i called my MD's office the next day, & they brought it up on-line...Also, last year had a good echo report & a Holter Monitor study revelaed no heart aliments... Also, I've noticed a new number last couple years on my blood tests, called "estimated GFR"...Actually, this was on my ER report last week as well...My number on this test every time has been greater than 60...I think this is some kind of kidney function test?... Is a random glucose reading of 140 somewhat normal after consuming sodas & a few cookies?.... Re: Random glucose of 140 after drinking sodas Depending on how long it had been since eating/drinking, it is most likely completely normal. Even in non-diabetics there is a spike, especially with that sort of food. The gfr is a measure of kidney function (glomerular filtration rate) and anything above 60 is considered "normal". Re: Random glucose of 140 after drinking sodas I was watchi Continue reading >>

Will Diet Coke Run Up My Blood Sugar Level?

Will Diet Coke Run Up My Blood Sugar Level?

With soda companies advertising their products as cool and refreshing beverages, sometimes it may be difficult to ignore a craving for cola. Due to the high amounts of sugar in cola, some people need to be wary of the effects of it on their blood sugar level. People with diabetes, for example, have high blood sugar levels because their body cannot properly use insulin to lower it. Others may drink diet sodas to prevent weight gain. As an alternative, people can select diet coke as it contains artificial sweeteners. Video of the Day A common sized can of soda is 12 fl. oz., or 335 mL. Diet Coke has one calorie in a 330 mL can compared to 139 calories in the original drink. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, FDA, permits five artificial sweeteners--aspartame, acesulfame--K, saccharin, sucralose and neotame. Diet Coke contains no sugar but uses aspartame and acesulfame-K. Limits on Artificial Sweeteners Besides approving the artificial sweeteners for use in foods, the FDA also has guidelines about the acceptable daily intake per kilogram of body weight. The Mayo Clinic illustrates that 50 mg per 1 kg of aspartame is acceptable, approximately equal to 18 or 19 cans of diet cola in a 68 kg, or 150 lb. person. The other ingredient in Diet Coke, acesulfame-K, is limited to 15 mg per kilogram, or roughly 30 to 32 cans of lemon-lime diet cola. Artificial sweeteners taste sweeter than sugar, so less is needed to flavor a food. Therefore, foods are usually lower in calorie if they contain these natural or chemical compounds. Both the Mayo Clinic and Harvard School of Public Health state that artificial sweeteners do not directly influence the blood sugar levels because they don't contain carbohydrates, fats or protein. However, foods with these sweeteners usually contain other Continue reading >>

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