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Blood Sugar 256 After Eating

The Hidden Epidemic Of Early Diabetes

The Hidden Epidemic Of Early Diabetes

Many people with high blood sugar levels are told by their doctors that they do not have diabetes because their fasting blood sugar levels are below 100 mg/dl, which is considered normal. Early in the disease, diabetics often have a "normal" fasting blood sugar, but one hour after they eat, their blood sugar levels rise above 140, which signals that they are at increased risk for heart attacks, strokes, cancers, nerve damage and premature death. Not knowing that you have early diabetes is a real tragedy because most cases of early diabetes can be cured with lifestyle changes. Early Diabetics Often Have Normal Fasting Blood Sugar Levels Everybody's blood sugar levels rise after they eat. If blood sugar levels rise above 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) after you eat, the sugar in your bloodstream can stick to the outer membranes of all types of cells in your body. Once stuck on a cell, blood sugar cannot get off and it is eventually converted by a series of chemical reactions to sorbitol that destroys that cell. This month, researchers showed that people whose blood sugar levels rise above 140 one hour after a meal already have all the same markers of arteriosclerosis as proven diabetics, even though they may have normal fasting blood sugar levels and a normal glucose tolerance test (Atherosclerosis, Jan 2017;256:15-20). Another study followed people with one-hour-after-eating-blood-sugar levels over 155 and showed that they die significantly earlier than those whose blood sugar levels do not rise that high after eating (Diabet Med, March 21, 2016. 10.1111/dme.13116). The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, composed of doctors who treat diabetics regularly, recommends that blood sugar levels should not be allowed to rise above 140 mg/dl two hours after a meal. Havin Continue reading >>

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Your blood glucose levels can determine whether you have or are at risk for developing diabetes, a condition in which your body no longer effectively processes and absorbs glucose from the bloodstream. Blood glucose levels fluctuate during the day, particularly after meals. Postprandial -- which means after eating -- glucose levels that rise beyond a certain level may mean you have diabetes or prediabetes. However, two-hour postprandial blood sugar testing is not recommended to screen for or diagnose diabetes. Video of the Day Two to 3 hours after eating a meal, blood glucose levels typically fall to normal fasting levels. For people without diabetes, this is typically 125 mg/dL or less, according to criteria established by the American Diabetes Association. If your 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level is higher than 125 mg/dL, your doctor will likely order one of the ADA-recommended blood tests for diagnosing diabetes. The options include a hemoglobin A1c test and an oral glucose tolerance test. Before developing type 2 diabetes, many people go through a phase called "prediabetes." With this condition, postprandial blood sugar levels are typically abnormally high -- but not elevated enough to meet the criteria for a diagnosis of diabetes. Modest weight loss, increased physical activity and dietary changes can often prevent prediabetes from progressing to type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

One of the topics that comes up a lot in the email I get from visitors to my What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes web site is the question of when is the best time to test your blood sugar. A lot of doctors still tell people with Type 2 to test first thing in the morning and before meals. That was what I was told at diagnosis in 1998. People who test using this schedule may tell you their blood sugar is usually 120 mg/dl, which sounds pretty good, except that since this is a fasting number it usually hides the information that the person's blood sugar maybe going to 250 mg/dl or higher after every meal. Research has shown that for people with Type 2 diabetes--especially those who have been diagnosed recently and still retain some beta cell function--it is the high spikes after meals that contribute most heavily to raising the A1c and causing complications. If you only test your fasting blood sugar, you will not know anything about how high your blood sugar is spiking after meals, so you won't know which foods are toxic to you because they cause dangerous spikes. If you are like most people with Type 2 your access to the very expensive blood sugar testing strips is limited. You may have to pay for strips yourself or your insurance may pay for a single box each month. That means that you need to use each strip as efficiently as possible. Here are some strategies that you can use to get the information out of your blood tests that will let you drop your A1c back into the healthy zone. Keep a written log that matches what you eat with the test result you get. Even though your meter may keep a list of your readings, these readings are meaningless unless you know what food you ate that resulted in each particular reading. If you write down what portion size of which food y Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Safety Alerts And Emergencies

Diabetes: Safety Alerts And Emergencies

Diabetes is a slow, steady illness that can turn serious very quickly. If you have diabetes, you should prepare yourself for a diabetic emergency. In a way, you're like a person living on a fault line who plans ahead for an earthquake. But you have an advantage: Instead of just preparing for a possible disaster, you can take steps to prevent it. Your doctor can tell you if you are at risk for a diabetic emergency. If you're in danger, you'll have to learn how to minimize the risks and how to respond to the worst-case scenario. For starters, you should wear an alert bracelet or other form of I.D. that will inform medical personnel of your condition. You should also set aside a stash of extra diabetes supplies in your home in case you can't make your regular shopping trips because of a blackout, flood, blizzard, or some other unforeseen problem. Items you may want to consider for your emergency pack include a cooler or other cold storage container with pre-made ice for keeping insulin and other supplies in case of an electrical outage; emergency glucose to treat hypoglycemia; a spare battery for your glucose test meter; canned food and several gallons of bottled water; flashlights and extra batteries; candles and matches; and, if you take insulin, extra insulin, syringes, lancets, blood test strips, and (if necessary) insulin pump supplies, according to the association Children with Diabetes. Common emergencies Extreme high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) Read about how to prepare for the most common diabetes emergencies: Like everyone else with diabetes, you have days when your blood sugar is a little higher than you'd like it to be. Usually, you can bring the levels back down with a little more exercise, a little less food, or a small change in medications (as directed by a Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar After Meals And What To Do About It

High Blood Sugar After Meals And What To Do About It

I will admit to having a bit of a diabetes crush on Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, Type 1, and founder of Integrated Diabetes Services, LLC. And you know what? I’m not the only one. I recently saw Gary give a talk called “Strike the Spike” at the American Association of Diabetes Educators’ (AADE) 2013 conference to a room packed with diabetes educators. The point was to help CDEs understand why managing/avoiding post-meal blood glucose spikes is important – and to learn new techniques for how to do so. I was there because I am constantly struggling with post-meal spikes. I appear to digest food quickly and absorb insulin slowly — that’s why I’m on Symlin, which helps slow down the emptying of my stomach so I’ve got some chance of having my insulin start working by the time my food makes it to my blood. (I love my Symlin.) But I wanted to hear what other tips Gary might have, and what the responses might be. Gary started with a seemingly simple question: why should anyone care about post-prandial (i.e. post-meal) spikes? At first this question made me furrow my brow — I can’t imagine that anyone wouldn’t care about post-meal blood glucose spikes — but I guess that in some cases, health care providers stress the A1c average more than they do the swings in between. Anyway, the audience slowly warmed up, and reasons started pouring in, mostly having to do with complications. Gary nodded along, affirming each one. I was still struggling with the whole concept of not caring, and so I was caught off guard — as was most of the audience — when he pointed out a very important reason that post-prandial spikes matter, one that none of the certified diabetes educators in the room had pointed out (and, oddly, which I myself hadn’t even thought of): because th Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Types of Diabetes The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually Continue reading >>

Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels

Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels

What are the dangerous levels for blood sugar? What is a dangerously high blood sugar level? How low a blood glucose reading is dangerous? I understand that all the above questions are huge problems for the diabetic mind and health. Don’t worry. Relax. Remember: stress is your enemy in your fight against diabetes. Why? During stress, your body produces some hormones that increase the blood sugar levels, and at the same time, they inhibit the insulin function. No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more As a consequence, you’ll have high blood sugar levels, which will help you face your “stress situation”. On the other hand, these levels can reach the highest peak (uncontrollable), and then, they are considered as dangerous high blood glucose level. What are the dangerously high blood sugar levels? Normally, in a diabetic, blood sugar levels will always stay high. During stress, more “sugar” is added to your blood, which then, turn to “become” dangerous. This is because your body will find it hard to bring them normal again. Furthermore, persistent high blood glucose level will cause many problems to all your body cells. How to recognize and distinguish these dangerous levels? All you need to do is to regularly check your glucose level. In case your blood sugar level is more than 200 mg/dl, persisting for more than two days, then this is considered as dangerous level, and you need further evaluation. Then, if you check your blood sugar, and have results higher than 300 mg/dl, together with urine incontinence, dry and cracked tongue, all these figures show you the danger of your situation too. Therefore, it’s time to search for specialist help. When you Continue reading >>

Chart For Blood Sugar Levels

Chart For Blood Sugar Levels

Making healthy lifestyle choices can certainly lower the risk of hyperglycemia, as well as hypoglycemia. The following Buzzle write-up provides a chart for blood sugar levels that will help you monitor the blood sugar levels, so that you can take steps to keep them within the normal range. Glucose is our body's primary source of energy. During digestion, the carbohydrate-rich food items get converted into glucose, which is then absorbed into the bloodstream. The levels of blood glucose or blood sugar are regulated with the help of insulin. Insulin, which is a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas, facilitates the absorption of glucose by the cells and tissues of the body. Glucose is also stored by the liver or muscle cells as glycogen. It is normal for the sugar level to fluctuate throughout the day. Glucose levels are the lowest in the mornings, and mostly tend to rise for a couple of hours after meals, depending on the volume of carbohydrates consumed. The normal range of the blood sugar in the morning is about 70 to 100 mg/dL. Our body has an excellent mechanism to regulate blood sugar levels. Glucose that is stored in the liver as glycogen, gets reabsorbed in the bloodstream, when the sugar levels drop. Normally, the blood sugar levels are tested on an empty stomach, usually after a gap of six to eight hours after having the last meal. This test is known as the fasting blood glucose test. The following chart provides the normal range for fasting blood sugar levels. The following table provides the average blood sugar levels of a normal healthy adult, 2 hours after eating a meal. Note: As per the American Diabetes Association, for people with type 2 diabetes, the normal fasting blood sugar range is 70-130 mg/dL, whereas blood sugar levels after meals should be le Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Spikes - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Blood Sugar Spikes - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi. My name is James. I am 26 years old and i currently have Type 2 diabetes. i am writing this out of concern because i just recently had a spike in blood sugar that has left me uneasy. I take Metformin 500mg 2 tablets twice a day and Glyburide 6mg 1 tablet twice a day. Now here is a thing all I had to eat everyday for the past week is a bowl of cereal and dinner and with the help of my meds brought my blood glucose down to 127 last night when i checked it. When I checked it this evening my Blood glucose was 256. Now I suffer from anxiety and panic attacks and is wondering also if that can contribute to spikes like that? Also I have had chronic diarrhea when I started taking the meds for the past week as well Some people who experience gastric issues with Metformin find they do fine on the extended release, Metformin ER formulation. Ask your doctor if you can switch to see if there's a difference. You may have panic and anxiety attacks or they may be symptoms of high blood glucose. Mood swings are a symptom of high bg. I can't say it's true for everyone but my own emotions tend to be much more stable since getting my bgs under control. According to my meter cereal and soda are probably the two worst things I can consume in terms of bg control. Unfortunately for many years those were my breakfast but no longer. YYMV (your mileage may vary) FYI of the 'milk substitutes' unsweetened almond milk is probably the lowest carb of the bunch at a paltry 2 grams carbs per serving. The sweetened version is good too but this one has even fewer carbs. It's good on cereal, for the rare occasion that I eat Continue reading >>

Tested With High Sugar Levels Today; 256 & 310

Tested With High Sugar Levels Today; 256 & 310

TESTED WITH HIGH SUGAR LEVELS TODAY; 256 & 310 on 11 th June I got tested for my sugar levels for the first time as there is family history. My fasting result is; 256 and post lunch; 310I am confused to go to allopathy medicines, pl advice VINOD You have done a wise thing by getting yourself tested at an early stage.Diabetes runs in families but that does not mean you have to suffer because of it.You can lead a perfectly normal life by making certain fundamental changes in your life style,because diabetes is also known as a lifestyle disorder.First and foremost,you have to equip yourself with the latest knowledge about diabetes.This is so because however much doctors,dieticians and your family may help you,at the end of the day it is you that will have to manage your diabetes.You have to watch your weight,your diet,your physical activity and whether any of your habits are irregular leading to stress.Reduce your weight somewhat without affecting your health.Whenever you eat food please be conscious about how the food may spike your sugar levels.If you think your activity level is not adequate,do something about it.Start playing a game like volleyball,shuttle etc or simply walk purposefully for about 40 minutes daily.Late nights,alcohol,soft drinks etc do not at all help you in managing your diabetes.Eat as little processed food as possible.At the end each diabetic is unique by himself and you have to develop your own unique methods to manage your diabetes. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 256 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 256 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 256 mg/dl after eating? (or 14.21mmol/l) Blood sugar 256 mg/dl (14.21mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 256 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Very High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia / Dangerous) To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 116mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight r Continue reading >>

How Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

How Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

When you have diabetes, your blood sugar (glucose) levels may be consistently high. Over time, this can damage your body and lead to many other problems. How much sugar in the blood is too much? And why is high glucose so bad for you? Here’s a look at how your levels affect your health. They're less than 100 mg/dL after not eating (fasting) for at least 8 hours. And they're less than 140 mg/dL 2 hours after eating. During the day, levels tend to be at their lowest just before meals. For most people without diabetes, blood sugar levels before meals hover around 70 to 80 mg/dL. For some people, 60 is normal; for others, 90. What's a low sugar level? It varies widely, too. Many people's glucose won't ever fall below 60, even with prolonged fasting. When you diet or fast, the liver keeps your levels normal by turning fat and muscle into sugar. A few people's levels may fall somewhat lower. Doctors use these tests to find out if you have diabetes: Fasting plasma glucose test. The doctor tests your blood sugar levels after fasting for 8 hours and it’s higher than 126 mg/dL. Oral glucose tolerance test. After fasting for 8 hours, you get a special sugary drink. Two hours later your sugar level is higher than 200. Random check. The doctor tests your blood sugar and it’s higher than 200, plus you’re peeing more, always thirsty, and you’ve gained or lost a significant amount of weight. He’ll then do a fasting sugar level test or an oral glucose tolerance test to confirm the diagnosis. Any sugar levels higher than normal are unhealthy. Levels that are higher than normal, but not reaching the point of full-blown diabetes, are called prediabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, 86 million people in the U.S. have this condition, which can lead to diabetes Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 256 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 256 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 256 mg/dl after eating? (or 14.21mmol/l) Blood sugar 256 mg/dl (14.21mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 256 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Very High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia / Dangerous) To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 116mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight r Continue reading >>

Foods That Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

Foods That Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

1.WHOLE GRAINS ( OATS ) In a 12-week study comparing whole-grain oat-based cereals to refined wheat-based cereals, researchers reported that 73 percent of hypertensive participants in the oats group were able to cut out their antihypertensive medications, or reduce them by half. The remaining participants also experienced significantly reduced blood pressure. How they work: The fiber and magnesium found in oats both have beneficial effects on blood pressure. In addition, oats slow atherosclerosis, the plaque buildup that occurs in blood vessels. How much: Aim for one serving (about three-fourths of a cup) of whole-grain oats per day, or at least six servings per week. For a boost of blood-pressure-lowering calcium and potassium, eat whole-grain oatmeal topped with skim milk (or unsweetened soy milk) and banana, or sprinkle oat bran on cereal and salads. Loose oats also make an excellent thickener for soups and stews. 2. COLD WATER FISH Cold-water fish are rich in anti-inflammatory omega-3 fats, which are famous for their cardiovascular benefits. In particular, omega-3s lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Wild (not farmed) salmon, tuna, mackerel, cod, trout, halibut, herring, and sardines are among the best sources. How it works: Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids: The human body can't make them, so we need to get them from the food we eat. Omega-3s act as a natural blood thinner, making it easier for your heart to pump blood around your body. Less viscous (thick) blood is also less likely to form clots in veins and arteries. How much: According to the joint guidelines from the FDA and the EPA, two six-ounce servings per week of most cold-water fish is a safe amount for most people, including pregnant women and nursing mothers, Continue reading >>

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