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Blood Sugar 253 After Eating

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Types of Diabetes The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. Normally, after a meal, the body breaks food down into glucose, which the blood carries to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Main types of Diabetes The two main types of diabetes are called type 1 and type 2. A third form of diabetes is called gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, and young adults. In this form of diabetes, the pancreas no longer makes insulin because the body’s immune system has attacked and destroyed the pancreatic cells specialized to make insulin. These insulin-producing cells are called beta cells. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. As a result, the body needs more insulin to help glucose enter cells to be used for energy. At first, the pancreas keeps up wit Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level 250-400 M/dl After Eating

Blood Sugar Level 250-400 M/dl After Eating

Ok, you ran diabetes test and you got blood sugar level 250-400 mg/dl after eating ranging 251, 252, 253 ,254 ,255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, 393, 394, ,395, 396, 397, 398, 399. This is considered as mild to moderate Diabetes. While giving more info, I have decided to share with you some of problems my daily patients online and offline have, with appropriate advice and caring tips. Hope you will understand if I let them anonymous to respect their privacy (most of these patients are from my offline clinic). I wish the advice would be helpful for you too. If you have your own concern, do not hesitate to write me back. No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more Why getting blood sugar levels 250-400 mg/dl after eating? After eating, the intake of carbohydrates we take with food increases the levels of glucose in our bloodstream. So, there is a peak of hyperglycemia after we eat. In normal people, the body increases the levels of insulin in order to neutralize the increased glucose levels. In diabetic people, this compensatory Continue reading >>

I Have To Go A Hospital If My Sugar Level Is 253?

I Have To Go A Hospital If My Sugar Level Is 253?

I have to go a hospital if my sugar level is 253? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: No. Take corrective insulin if you take insulin. 253 is not an emergency situation. Do some light exercise and stay hydrated to help bring your blood sugar down. Source(s): Secrets To Reverse Diabetes : I have to go a hospital if my sugar level is 253? Source(s): hospital sugar level 253: I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of this horrible disease is the severe pain I constantly get in my feet. The pain is so bad that I avoid standing and walking as much as possible. I've got to tell you that within the first month, my feet stopped hurting altogether and I can now walk totally pain free. Believe it or not, I even danced at my niece's wedding last month, something I have not done in a many years. I've been following the book for six months now and my blood sugar is well within normal range. I feel great! I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes. I think if someone is above 300 and is not able to lower their BG they should go to the hospital. She should try the ER again, and demand they do something for her. Many of these hospitals send resident doctors (in other words, trainees) to see people in the ER. So don't feel shy asking if the doctor is a resident or not, and if you can get a second opinion. But wait until you're in the back to dig in your heels :) She should call her regular doctor or her endocrinologist if she has one and make an appointment. The doctor may be willing to see her sooner for something like this. Upload failed. Please upload a file larger than 100x100 pixels We are experiencing some proble Continue reading >>

New Research On High Glucose Levels

New Research On High Glucose Levels

American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines advise “lowering A1C to below or around 7%” and postprandial (after-meal) glucose levels to 180 mg/dl or below. But new research shows that these glucose levels damage blood vessels, nerves, organs, and beta cells. An article by diabetes blogger Jenny Ruhl analyzes at what blood glucose level organ damage starts. According to Ruhl, research shows that glucose can do harm at much lower levels than doctors had thought. This news could be discouraging or even terrifying. If it’s hard to meet your current glucose goals, how will you reach tighter goals? Such news might make some people give up. But remember, a high postprandial or fasting reading won’t kill you. All we know is that higher numbers correlate with higher chances of complications. You have time to react. In fact, we could choose to look at this as good news. We all know of people who developed complications despite “good control.” But complications are not inevitable; it’s just that so-called “good control” wasn’t really all that good. First, the numbers. “Post-meal blood sugars of 140 mg/dl [milligrams per deciliter] and higher, and fasting blood sugars over 100 mg/dl [can] cause permanent organ damage and cause diabetes to progress,” Ruhl writes. For nerve damage, University of Utah researchers studied people with painful sensory neuropathy, or nerve damage. They found that participants who did not have diabetes but who had impaired glucose tolerance on an oral glucose tolerance test, or OGTT, (meaning that their glucose levels rose to between 140 mg/dl and 200 mg/dl in response to drinking a glucose-rich drink) were much more likely to have a diabetic form of neuropathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The higher these OGTT num Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 253 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 253 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 253 mg/dl after eating? (or 14.04mmol/l) Blood sugar 253 mg/dl (14.04mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 253 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Very High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia / Dangerous) To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 113mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight r Continue reading >>

"is This High": Diabetes Community - Support Group

These message boards are closed to posting. Please head onover to our new WebMD Message Boards to check out and participate in the greatconversations taking place: Your new WebMD Message Boards are now open! 1. Head over to this page: 2. Choose the tag from the drop-down menu thatclicks most with you (and add it to any posts you create so others can easilyfind and sort through posts) My blood sugar is running about 253 or above or slightly below. It's been like that for awhile. I would like to know if that is okay or do I need medicine. I'm handling my diabetes with diet and exercise, but it doesn't seem to be enough. I'm a strict diabetic eater and a strict exerciser. I do like I'm suppose to and it's still high. What do you think? Is 253 even high in the first place? Thanks! Your reply violates WebMD's rules. The issue ishighlighted in red. Please correct the issue, then click Submit. Post my content anonymously (without my username) Put this on my watchlist and alert me by email to new posts Yes, it is quite high. Your fasting should be below 100 and 2 hours after a meal it should be less than 140. You need to speak to your doctor and work out what needs to be done. T1 1966, Dialysis 2001, kidney transplant and pump 2002, pancreas transplant 2008 Denise, I agree with Cora, especially if like you say, you're strict with your diet and are doing exercise. I'm on medicine and diet alone, too, but when I do have too many carbs at one time, my blood sugar will rise to 200 in a heartbeat. When you say you're strict, does that mean you keep your meals smaller, OR your carb levels are around 35-40 for a meal? If not, try to keep them at those levels and see what happens. Definitely make an appt. with your doctor right away, though, and talk to him/her about this. Have you th Continue reading >>

Blood - Sugar Chart

Blood - Sugar Chart

Blood Sugar-Conversion Blood Sugar Chart Diabetes Risk Assessment Calculator Glycemic Index Calculator HbA1c or A1c Calculator for Blood Glucose View all Adult Height Potential Height and Weight for Children Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Calculator Development Milestone Immunisation View All Check Your Prostate Gland Drugs and Sexual Problem Calculator Depression Calculator Preventive Health - Screening Tests & Charts Sexual Symptoms (Undesirable) and Drugs Calculator View All Multiple Pregnancy Calculator Ovulation Calculator / Ovulation Calendar / Ovulation Chart Pregnancy Due Date Calculator Pregnancy Confirmation Calculator Virginity Calculator View All Frame Size Calculator Height and Weight for Children Height and Weight by Body Frame for Adults Ideal Baby Weight Ideal Body Weight - Adults View All Alzheimer's Risk Assessment Calculator Dementia Risk Calculator Weight Loss Calculator Adult ADHD Screening Calculator Age for Marriage License View All Heart Attack Risk Calculator Cholesterol Risk Calculator Diabetes Risk Assessment Calculator Osteoporosis Risk Chart Stroke Risk Calculator View All Daily Calorie Requirements Daily Calorie Requirement for Age and Lifestyle Recommended Intake of Minerals Vitamins and Minerals in Food Items Daily Calorie Counter for Indian Food View All Activity Calorie Calculator Blood Pressure Calculator Blood Pressure Chart Breath Calculator Cardiac Risk or Risk of Heart Attack View All Continue reading >>

How To Get Blood Glucose Below 200

How To Get Blood Glucose Below 200

The main symptom in diabetes is high blood sugar, which is also known as hyperglycemia. According to the American Diabetes Association, fasting blood sugar levels above 125 mg/dl are too high and result in a diagnosis of diabetes. Postprandial blood glucose levels, which are glucose levels after a meal, need to be below 200 mg/dl two hours after eating. If glucose remains in your blood for too long, it can cause damage to your body, including heart disease and amputation. In just a few steps, you can take actions that help lower your blood glucose level below 200 mg/dl. Test your urine with urine test strips that check for ketones if your blood glucose is 240 mg/dl or higher. If you test positive for ketones, contact your doctor immediately. A positive test means you may have diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a serious condition that results in a diabetic coma or even death if left untreated. Eat less food, especially items containing sugar. Carbohydrates rapidly increase your blood glucose levels after a meal. Protein and fat also increase your blood sugar as well, but to a lesser extent. If you have a diagnosis of pre-diabetes or diabetes, your body takes longer than non-diabetics to return your postprandial blood sugar levels to normal. The pancreas secretes insulin to tell the body to absorb the glucose in your body. If your cells don't respond well to insulin, this is a condition called insulin resistance that causes high blood sugar. Also, if your pancreas is too damaged to produce enough insulin, that results in high blood sugar as well. For both conditions, eating less food, and less sugar in particular, help to reduce blood glucose levels. Your doctor prescribes diabetes medications to help your body control blood sugar levels throughout the day. If blood glucose Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

4 December 2012why Is My Blood Glucose So High When I Wake Up?

4 December 2012why Is My Blood Glucose So High When I Wake Up?

It doesn't seem fair, does it? You haven't eaten anything all night and you still wake up with high blood glucose! What is going on and how can you lower it? For those of you with diabetes, this post is for you! Basics Your body strives to keep blood glucose (BG) within a safe range, but with diabetes the balance is disturbed. The insulin your pancreas produces might not be sufficient to cover your BG lowering needs. As well, the insulin it does produce might not be handled properly by target body cells. And to make matters worse, your liver might be on glucose production overdrive. All of this results in your body's failure to control BG overnight as well as after meals or snacks. For more basic information about diabetes, please be sure to read my article, Diabetes Basics at MyNetDiary's library. Dawn Phenomenon Due to normal daily changes in our body's release of hormones during sleep and wake cycles, BG typically starts to rise in the very early morning – starting about 3 AM - and continues to rise as the morning progresses. For folks without diabetes, insulin production simply increases and takes care of the rising BG. However, for folks with diabetes, unless there is medication on board to cover this early morning rise, BG will eventually rise out of target range by the time they wake up. The classic pattern is to see BG within target range at both bedtime and during the middle of the night, and then see a high fasting BG. If you have noticed that your fasting BG is creeping up over time and is no longer within target range despite sticking to a carb controlled eating plan and taking your diabetes medication as prescribed, then it might be time to talk with your doctor about your diabetes medication. The type, dose, and/or timing might need to be adjusted to bet Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 253 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 253 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insulin comes in short, long and fast-acting forms, and a person suffering from type 1 diabetes is likely to be prescribed some combination of these. Individuals who are either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or are considered at risk for the disease are recommended to make alterations to their diet, lifestyle habits and exercise routine in order to lower blood sugar and keep it under control. These changes generally help to improve blood glucose control, individuals with type 2 diabetes may require medication eventually. These can include glitazones, acarbose, glucophage or sulphonylureas. Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar After Eating?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar After Eating?

Sugar is vital to your health. It feeds your brain and provides your body with fuel. Too much or too little sugar can carry serious health risks. It is normal for your body to experience spikes and dips in your sugar levels depending on your current activity. Your body does have a built-in mechanism called the pancreas that helps to prevent your sugar levels from spiking too high or dipping too low. Blood Glucose Many foods that you eat contain the sugar vital to your body's normal function. Sweets, such as candy, cake or cookies, contain processed sugar. Fruit contains natural sugar. The body converts carbohydrates into sugar. When you ingest sugar from any of these sources, it enters your bloodstream and becomes what is known as blood glucose or blood sugar. You can test your blood glucose level by placing a small amount of blood on a small strip of treated paper that you then insert into a glucose meter. Normal blood sugar levels are between 70 mg/dl to 120 mg/dl (milligrams of blood glucose per deciliter of blood). Hyperglycemia is when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal. Blood glucose levels below normal can cause a condition called hypoglycemia. When sugar enters your bloodstream, your pancreas is triggered to produce a hormone called insulin. Insulin bonds with the blood glucose, allowing it to feed your body the energy that it needs. The pancreas constantly monitors your blood glucose levels and produces enough insulin to fuel your body and keep your blood glucose levels in the normal range. High Blood Glucose From Eating a Meal There are several activities that can cause normal fluctuations outside of the normal range in your blood glucose. The most common are eating a meal, exercise and stress. When you eat a meal that contains any sugar source, Continue reading >>

Is Glucose 253 Good Or Bad - Doctor Answers On Healthcaremagic

Is Glucose 253 Good Or Bad - Doctor Answers On Healthcaremagic

I would like to ask Is the iron supplements will affecting in high blood glucose?? My father got diabetics and he have a good control in blood suger. Last week he started the iron supplement, unfortunately ... recently diagnosed with present diabetes m on strict diet and glucose tolerance is good now is it reversible my doc say it is Dr. Shafi Ullah Khan, General & Family Physician Hello there! diabetes type2 once got is not a reversible disease, it can not be cured but can be managed. I am sure your doctor would have meant regarding medicines usage as some times excercise and diet modifications are enough in Diabetes, But that is actually an impaired glucose tolerance, a phase between normal and diabetic state, If a person do prevention and follow advices he recoverskhan my blood glucose sugar after fasting was 164 . is that pre-diabetic or diabetic Dr. Karen Steinberg, Internal Medicine Specialist That is considered diabetic. You need to get in to see your doctor and get started on the right diet and treatment. Good luck. Hope this helps. If you have further questions, I would be happy to answer them. i have fasting blood glucose 124 ... & random after 2 hours of eating 157 Hello,Welcome to healthcare magic. Were you diagnosed as a diabetic earlier and are you on medications ? This value is not normal and shows that your blood sugars are deranged. It is better to consult an endocrinologist. Sugar levels are not very high, so a good exercise regime and diet control can control the sugars. Kindly follow endocrinologist's advice.Hope this helped,Take care. Is glucose 253 good or bad Glucose is 96 good or bad Is glucose solution good for health 104 glucose good or bad Continue reading >>

What You Don’t Know About Blood Sugar

What You Don’t Know About Blood Sugar

The most cherished benefit of Foundation membership is discovering something new in every Life Extension publication. Unlike typical health journals, we inform members about what they don’t know concerning medical findings that are overlooked by conventional and alternative doctors. In our relentless review of the scientific literature, we have uncovered data that calls into question what the safe range of blood sugar really is. Current guidelines state that a person is diabetic if fasting blood glucose levels exceed 126 mg/dL on two consecutive occasions. Fasting glucose levels over 109 are flagged as potential prediabetic (glucose intolerant) states. Life Extension has long argued that optimal glucose ranges are less than 100. In a new hypothesis that shakes the pillars of conventional wisdom, it now appears that optimal fasting blood glucose levels should probably be under 86 mg/dL. This means that those with high “normal” glucose (86-109) are at an increased risk of premature death. While the medical establishment clearly understands the lethal dangers of hyperglycemia (blood sugar over 126), they have yet to recognize that even high normal glucose levels pose a serious threat to one’s health. Conventional Medicine’s Interpretation Of Fasting Glucose Blood Tests 70-109 mg/dL . . . . . . . . .Normal glucose tolerance 110-125 mg/dL. . . . . . . . .Impaired fasting glucose (prediabetes) 126+ mg/dL . . . . . . . . .Probable diabetes Life Extension’s Fasting Glucose Guidelines 70-85 mg/dL . . . . . . . . . Optimal (no glucose intolerance) 86-99 mg/dL . . . . . . . . . Borderline impaired fasting glucose 100+ mg/dL . . . . . . . . . .Probable prediabetes Why “Normal” Glucose Levels Are Dangerous To support our hypothesis that higher“normal” ranges of b Continue reading >>

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