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Blood Sugar 213 After Eating

I Am Not Facing Any Blood Sugar Related Problem. However As Per Annual Medical Check This Year My Pp Level Was 419 Mg/dl & Fasting Sugar 213 Mg/dl. Then I Went For Hba1c Test There It Came 7.4%.request Advise.

I Am Not Facing Any Blood Sugar Related Problem. However As Per Annual Medical Check This Year My Pp Level Was 419 Mg/dl & Fasting Sugar 213 Mg/dl. Then I Went For Hba1c Test There It Came 7.4%.request Advise.

General Physician 90% (21577 ratings) 32 years experience You are definitely diabetic and it may not any symptoms initially. You need treatment .Diabetes affects all organs in the body Eyes, kidneys, nerves, reproductive system all are affected, In fact, from toe to hair. For diabetic control, patient and doctor should be in constant touch for regular follow up and advice. The common symptoms are :-Both types of diabetes have some of the same tell-tale warning signs.Hunger and fatigue. Your body converts the food you eat into glucose that your cells use for energy. But your cells need insulin to bring the glucose in.If your body doesn't make enough or any insulin, or if your cells resist the insulin your body makes, the glucose can't get into them and you have no energy. This can make you more hungry and tired than usual. Urinating more often and being thirstier. The average person usually has to pee between four and seven times in 24 hours, but people with diabetes may go a lot more.Dry mouth and itchy skin. Because your body is using fluids to make pee, there's less moisture for other things. You could get dehydrated, and your mouth may feel dry. Dry skin can make you itchy.Blurred vision. Changing fluid levels in your body could make the lenses in your eyes swell up. They change shape and lose their ability to focus.Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. It is a difficult task to control blood sugar in the desired normal range. Whatever we eat is metabolised to sugar in the body to provide energy for our daily activities. For th Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Who Gets Diabetes and How to Manage It Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. Several factors, such as body weight, family history and race and ethnicity may increase your risk of diabetes. Diabetes can be effectively managed by exercising and eating a healthy diet. What is diabetes? Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated—or poorly managed—it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. Your body and sugar To understand diabetes, it’s helpful to understand the basics of how your body metabolizes (breaks down) sugar. Most of the cells in your body need sugar as a source of energy. When you eat carbohydrates, such as a bowl of pasta or some vegetables, your digestive system breaks the carbohydrates down into simple sugars such as glucose, which travel into and through your bloodstream to nourish and energize cells. A key player in the breakdown of sugar is the pancreas, a fish-shaped gland behind your stomach and liver. The pancreas fills two roles. It produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine to help break down the nutrients in your food—proteins, carbohydrates, and fats—to provide sources of energy and building material for the body’s cells. It makes hormones that regulate the disposal of nutrients, including sugars. Cells in Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 213 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 213 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insulin comes in short, long and fast-acting forms, and a person suffering from type 1 diabetes is likely to be prescribed some combination of these. Individuals who are either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or are considered at risk for the disease are recommended to make alterations to their diet, lifestyle habits and exercise routine in order to lower blood sugar and keep it under control. These changes generally help to improve blood glucose control, individuals with type 2 diabetes may require medication eventually. These can include glitazones, acarbose, glucophage or sulphonylureas. Continue reading >>

Postprandial Blood Glucose Is A Stronger Predictor Of Cardiovascular Events Than Fasting Blood Glucose In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Particularly In Women: Lessons From The San Luigi Gonzaga Diabetes Study

Postprandial Blood Glucose Is A Stronger Predictor Of Cardiovascular Events Than Fasting Blood Glucose In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Particularly In Women: Lessons From The San Luigi Gonzaga Diabetes Study

Postprandial Blood Glucose Is a Stronger Predictor of Cardiovascular Events Than Fasting Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Particularly in Women: Lessons from the San Luigi Gonzaga Diabetes Study Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Department of Public Health, University of Turin (A.P., G.C.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital (F.C., M.Tra., K.B., E.F., M.C., G.A., M.Tro.), 10043 Orbassano, Turin, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Department of Public Health, University of Turin (A.P., G.C.), 10043 Orba Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

June 2005 Glucose Tolerance Test

June 2005 Glucose Tolerance Test

GLUCOSE FASTING – 62 1-HOUR GLUCOSE – 165 2-HOUR GLUCOSE – 213 I failed the glucose tolerance test I took in June 2005. This alerted me that my body was in trouble.The purpose of a glucose tolerance test is to see how effectively your body tolerates a blast sugar. If your body doesn’t clear the excess sugar out of your blood quickly enough, you’re classified as a diabetic. Back then, I didn’t know much about the full range of tests that might give a comprehensive indication of what was going on. But at least I got the key “official” test. That’s what this is. It may not be the best test, or the most useful one. But at least, it is an official test. Here’s a larger example of how the lab test looked: GLUCOSE FASTING – 62 1-HOUR GLUCOSE – 165 2-HOUR GLUCOSE – 213 FASTING GLUCOSE means I didn’t eat anything for breakfast that morning, and I hadn’t eating anything past 7 PM the night before. I had drunk some water, but had no food . . . until the test began. Here’s how it happens. First, the lab did a finger prick with a glucometer. You might notice that my fasting blood sugar of 62 was marked as “Low.” Actually, if you’re insulin senstive, a blood sugar in the 60s can be normal, and in fact, healthy. I was feeling just fine, so I was not concerned about my sugars being 62. Neither was Ron Rosedale when I told him about this later. Neither was my endocrinologist, Christopher Fox, once I officially became one of his patients. So it’s puzzling to me that on a lab test, this kind of blood sugar gets marked as low. Go figure. 1-HOUR GLUCOSE was taken one hour after the sugar part of this tolerance test was underway. That means 1-hour after the lab had given me a cup of supersweet sugar water to chug on down. I think 75 mg of sugar is stan Continue reading >>

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Do you wake up with a blood glucose level that’s higher than when you went to bed? You might wonder how this could be. Is this “dawn phenomenon” serious, and what can you do about it? Our reader Mishelle commented here, “I don’t eat [much] during the day. [I take metformin morning and night.] My blood sugar is still too high in the morning…sometimes 125–140ish.” How can Mishelle’s glucose levels go up if she didn’t eat anything? She probably has a mild case of dawn phenomenon. Her glucose is going up from sources other than digested food. Some of it is produced by the liver from stored starch and fatty acids. Livers that produce too much glucose are one of the main ways diabetes causes high blood glucose levels. Other organs also produce small amounts of glucose. This is called “gluconeogenesis” for you science freaks out there. Organs do this to keep blood glucose from going too low at night or other times of not eating. From about 2 AM to 8 AM, most people’s bodies produce hormones, including cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. All these hormones increase insulin resistance and tell the liver to make more glucose. The idea is to get you enough glucose to get out of bed and start the day. The whole process is apparently started by growth hormones. Everyone has a dawn phenomenon. Otherwise they’d be too weak to get breakfast. But in people without diabetes, insulin levels also increase to handle the extra glucose. People with diabetes can’t increase insulin levels that much, so their early morning blood glucose levels can rise dramatically. Experts disagree on how many people have a dawn phenomenon. Estimates range from 3% to 50% of Type 2s and from 25% to 50% of Type 1s. Is dawn phenomenon a serious problem? It can be serious. According t Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

I had a two hour blood glucose test done. My fasting blood sugar was 75 mg/dl [4.2 mmol/L] after the glucose drink. At 30 minutes, it was 140 mg/dl [7.8 mmol/L]; after one hour, it was 202 mg/dl [11.1 mmol/L]; after two hours, it was 213 mg/dl [11.8 mmol/L] and some sugar spilled over. Thirty minutes later, my blood sugar was 189 mg/dl [10.5 mmol/L]. Up until about a month ago, I had poor eating habits. I would eat one breakfast burrito and a small sweet tea at 7 a.m. and not eat another meal or snack until about 6 p.m. Then, I had to test my sugars for a month on a low carbohydrate diet. If I stayed on the diet, my blood sugar was within range, but I strayed from time to time to see what the sugar would be then. They would range from anywhere from 120 mg/dl [6.7 mmol/L] to 188 mg/dl [10.4 mmol/L] two hours after eating. Sometimes my blood sugar was high at the three to four hour mark. Then, I tested myself on the diet of two meals a day that I eat and my sugars stayed in the 70s mg/dl [3.9 to 4.3 mmol/L] all day except for dinner. During the four week home sugar testing, I would have fastings ranging mainly in the 80s mg/dl [4.4 to 4.9 mmol/L] and 90s mg/dl [5.0 to 5.5 mmol/L], but had two that were 138 mg/dl [7.7 mmol/L] and 140 mg/dl [7.8 mmol/L] fasting and three that were 103 mg/dl [5.7 mmol/L] to 113 mg/dl [6.3 mmol/L]. I feel nauseous in middle of night sometimes and sometimes wake up feeling sick on top of going to bathroom more often on some days. My doctor said everything was fine, that I was not borderline or diabetic and that he was not concerned about any of the readings since my A1c came back so low, 5.1. Could the low A1c be because I had lower blood sugars when eating only twice a day? You have diabetes. The oral glucose tolerance test is confirmation o Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

Blood sugar control is a main goal for people living with type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar levels can lead to a variety of complications over time, including nerve damage, heart disease, and vision problems. Blood sugar levels that are too low can cause more immediate problems, such as dizziness, confusion, and potentially a loss of consciousness. Keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible is key to preventing these complications and living well with type 2 diabetes. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Glucose, or blood sugar, comes from two places — the food you eat and your liver. “Blood sugar is basically used to supply energy to the body,” explains Deborah Jane Wexler, MD, an endocrinologist in practice at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. For instance, one of your most valued organs — your brain — runs entirely on glucose, she notes. Insulin is used to move glucose into cells to be used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, leading to high blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar can occur when you take too much diabetes medication, skip a meal, or increase your physical activity. Monitoring your blood sugar — by making sure it doesn’t spike too high or dip too low — is an important part of managing your type 2 diabetes. And you can start by learning the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and steps to take to bring those levels back to normal: Hypoglycemia: If blood sugar is too low — usually below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — you may have symptoms such as confusion, sweating, nervousness, nausea, and dizziness. You could even pass out Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 213 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 213 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 213 mg/dl after eating? (or 11.82mmol/l) Blood sugar 213 mg/dl (11.82mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 213 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 73mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Pregnancy is a wondrous and exciting time. It’s a time of change, both physically and emotionally. With the proper attention and prenatal medical care, most women with diabetes can enjoy their pregnancies and welcome a healthy baby into their lives. Why Tight Blood Sugar Control Is Critically Important Blood sugar control is important from the first week of pregnancy all the way until delivery. Organogenesis takes place in the first trimester. Uncontrolled blood sugar during the early weeks of pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, and birth defects. (Women don’t develop gestational diabetes until later in pregnancy, which means they don’t share these early pregnancy risks.) Later in the pregnancy, uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause fetal macrosomia, which may lead to shoulder dystocia, fractures, and the need for Cesarean section deliveries. Very high blood sugar levels can increase the risk of stillbirth. Maternal hyperglycemia can stimulate fetal hyperinsulinemia, and lead to neonatal hypoglycemia when the glucose supply (umbilical cord) is cut. Because of all these increased risks, home deliveries are not typically recommended for women with any form of diabetes. As many as two thirds of all women with diabetes have unplanned pregnancies and most women don’t realize that they’re pregnant until six or more weeks into the pregnancy. That’s why it’s critically important for women who have diabetes to use contraception and achieve tight blood sugar control prior to conception. Many health-care providers suggest at least three to six months of stable blood sugar control prior to attempting to conceive. Hemoglobin A1c should be within 1 percentage point above the lab normal, which means striving for a HbA1c of less than 7 percent. Women using or Continue reading >>

Proven Methods To Reduce Fasting And Postprandial Glucose Levels

Proven Methods To Reduce Fasting And Postprandial Glucose Levels

Scientific studies indicate that any amount of fasting glucose over 85 mg/dL incrementally adds to heart attack risk.1 Postprandial glucose surges over 140 mg/dL lead to diabetic complications, even in those who are not diabetic. If you can choose an ideal fasting glucose reading, it would probably be around 74 mg/dL.2 We know, however, that some people are challenged to keep their glucose under 100 mg/dL. What this means is that it is critically important for aging individuals to follow an aggressive program to suppress excess glucose as much as possible. The good news is that many approaches that reduce glucose also lower insulin,3,4 LDL,3,5-7 triglycerides,3,8-10 and C-reactive protein,11 thereby slashing one’s risk of vascular disease,9,12-14 cancer,15-18 dementia,19-23 and a host of other degenerative disorders. This month’s issue featured an in-depth review of green coffee bean extract that has been shown to reduce postprandial glucose levels by an average of 32%.24 It functions by inhibiting the glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme that enables the body to create new surplus glucose and inappropriately release stored glucose from tissues. To achieve optimal glucose levels, some people will need to take steps to impede glucose absorption and improve insulin sensitivity. In this section, we succinctly describe drugs, hormones, nutrients, and lifestyle changes that facilitate healthy glucose levels. Nutrient Options Since Life Extension® members know it is best to take dietary supplements with meals, it should not be difficult for them to make it a routine practice to shield their bloodstream from excessive calorie absorption by taking the proper nutrients before most meals. An efficient way of obtaining nutrients that can impede the impact of carbohydrate and fat food Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar 1-2 Hours After Eating

Normal Blood Sugar 1-2 Hours After Eating

Normal Blood Sugar 1-2 hours after Eating Blood sugar (glucose) is one of the most important variables in your metabolism. It’s the main source of your energy. What levels of blood sugar before meal and 1-2 hours after eating are considered normal and abnormal? The answer may vary, depending on whether or not you are diabetic and non-diabetic. As the name suggests, blood sugar is sugar (glucose) that circulates in the bloodstream. Glucose is required by the body to make energy to support your activity throughout the day. If you have diabetes, it is easier to rise. Actually diabetes is harmless, as long as you can control your blood glucose as well! But the problem occurs when your blood glucose level is out of control, causing some serious complications! Both too high and too low blood sugar is bad for your body. Therefore, it’s important to keep it normal! For non-diabetics, abnormal level of blood glucose may signal pre-diabetes stage. And for those with diabetes – prolonged, poorly controlled blood glucose can cause serious complications such as: cardiovascular diseases, stroke, nerve damage, kidney failure, retinal problems, and more! Either lab test or home test for checking blood glucose is blood test. It requires a small amount of your blood, typically taken from a finger. This sample blood is then analyzed, and soon you’ll be informed of the test result. Alternative names; HbA1c, glycosylated hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, and hemoglobin A1C! This blood test is often used to diagnose type-2 and type-1 diabetes. It is also commonly used to help gauge how well diabetics are managing their diabetes. It can reveal the average blood sugar level in the last 2-3 months. It can specifically measure the percentage of hemoglobin, a substance in your red blood c Continue reading >>

About High Blood Sugar

About High Blood Sugar

The American Diabetes Association recommends blood sugar goals for people with diabetes. These don’t apply to everyone, however, so work with your doctor to set the right goals for you. These goals are not applicable to pregnant women or children. These goals should be individualized. One of the goals of your diabetes treatment is to keep blood sugar levels within the target range determined by your doctor. When your blood sugar level is above the target range, this is called high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Possible causes of high blood sugar What to do if you have high blood sugar These are guidelines only. Please discuss specific high blood sugar recommendations with your healthcare team. †Your healthcare team can provide more details on how to check for ketones. High blood sugar can include any combination of these symptoms and/or others not listed. About low blood sugar Low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia (70 mg/dL or below), is the most common side effect associated with insulins, including Humalog. It can be caused by: Being more physically active than usual Taking too much diabetes medication Eating at the wrong time for the medication you take Taking other medication in addition to Humalog Skipping or not finishing meals or snacks Low blood sugar can also be caused by a combination of these or other factors. What does low blood sugar feel like? Low blood sugar can include one or any combination of these symptoms—and they might not be the same every time, depending on how low your blood sugar gets and which factors caused it to drop. You may even have no symptoms—that’s why it’s important to test your blood sugar regularly. Over time, you may learn to recognize the symptoms of low blood sugar and its effects on the body. Managing low blood sug Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

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