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Black Cohosh And Type 1 Diabetes

Typefree Diabetes - The Diabetes Lifestyle Super Online Store

Typefree Diabetes - The Diabetes Lifestyle Super Online Store

Black cohosh is a plant native to North America. Common Names--black cohosh, black snakeroot, macrotys, bugbane, bugwort, rattleroot, rattleweed Latin Names--Actaea racemosa, Cimicifuga racemosa Black cohosh has a history of use for rheumatism (arthritis and muscle pain), but has been used more recently to treat hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and other symptoms that can occur during menopause. Black cohosh has also been used for menstrual irregularities and premenstrual syndrome, and to induce labor. The underground stems and roots of black cohosh are commonly used fresh or dried to make strong teas (infusions), capsules, solid extracts used in pills, or liquid extracts (tinctures). Study results are mixed on whether black cohosh effectively relieves menopausal symptoms. Studies to date have been less than 6 months long, so long-term safety data are not currently available. NCCAM is funding studies to determine whether black cohosh reduces the frequency and intensity of hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. There are not enough reliable data to determine whether black cohosh is effective for rheumatism or other uses. Black cohosh can cause headaches and stomach discomfort. In clinical trials comparing the effects of the herb and those of estrogens, a low number of side effects were reported, such as headaches, gastric complaints, heaviness in the legs, and weight problems. No interactions have been reported between black cohosh and prescription medicines. Black cohosh has recently been linked to a few cases of hepatitis (inflammation of the liver), but it is not clear whether black cohosh caused the problem. It is not clear if black cohosh is safe for women who have had breast cancer or for pregnant women. Black cohosh should not be confused with blue Continue reading >>

Will You Have Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Black Cohosh - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With Black Cohosh - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 42 year old woman who takes Plavix NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Black Cohosh: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Actaea macrotys, Actaea racemosa, Acte Grappes, Acte Grappes Noires, Acte Noire, Aristolochiaceae Noire, Baie dacte, Black Cohosh, Baneberry, Black Aristolochiaceae, Black Snakeroot, Bugbane, Bugwort, Cimicaire Grappes, Cimicifuga, Cimicifuga Racemosa, Cimicifuge, Cohosh Negro, Cohosh Noir, Cytise, Herbe aux Punaises, Macrotys, Phytoestrogen, Phytoestrogne, Racine de Serpent, Racine de Squaw, Racine Noire de Serpents, Rattle Root, Rattle Top, Rattlesnake Root, Rattleweed, Rhizoma Cimicifugae, Sheng Ma, Snakeroot, Squaw Root. Black cohosh is an herb. The root of this herb is used for medicinal purposes. Black cohosh was first used for medicinal purposes by Native American Indians, who introduced it to European colonists. Black cohosh became a popular treatment for womens health issues in Europe in the mid-1950s. Since that time, black cohosh has commonly been used to treat symptoms of menopause , premenstrual syndrome ( PMS ), painful menstruation , acne , weakened bones ( osteoporosis ), and for starting labor in pregnant women. Black cohosh has also been tried for a lot of additional uses, such as anxiety , rheumatism, fever, sore throat , and cough , but it is not often used for these purposes these days. Some people also apply black cohosh directly on the skin . This is because there was some thought that black cohosh would improve the skins appearance. Similarly, people used black cohosh for other skin conditions such as acne , wart removal, and even the removal of moles, but this is seldom done anymore. Black cohosh also goes by the name bugbane because it was once used as an insect repellent. It is no longer used for this purpose. Frontiersmen had said that black cohosh was useful for rattlesnake bites, but no modern researchers have tested this. Do not confuse b Continue reading >>

Which Herbal Medications Interact With Diabetes ... | Diabetic Connect

Which Herbal Medications Interact With Diabetes ... | Diabetic Connect

OH, I thought that since herbal medicines were "all natural" they couldn't do me any harm!!!! (tongue FIRMLY planted in cheek) I guess that's not so? Mays, my former boss is a Certified Holistic Health Nurse as well as an RN. One day I was reading an article on yahoo about the benefits of herbal medications. I printed it out for her to read. She read it and threw it in the trash. The first thing she said was do not believe anything in the article and proceeded to tell us that if you want to use herbal medications you should speak to a Certified Holistic Health Nurse or Holistic Health Educator before taking them. When you make the appointment take all of your prescribed medications with you as they will tell you what herbal medications you can take with the medications you are on and that you should make sure you speak with your doctor about weaning you off your meds before you start taking herbal supplements. She also recommended the best books on the market to use when starting a herbal supplements. If you take Coumadin, your doctor should give you a list of veggies you can't eat when taking this medication. My moms doctor and my aunts doctor provided them a list when they were taking it. Continue reading >>

Does Black Cohosh Interact With Type 1 Diabetes? Complete Overview | Treato

Does Black Cohosh Interact With Type 1 Diabetes? Complete Overview | Treato

Black Cohosh and Hot Flashes Type 1 Diabetes and Diabetes Black Cohosh and Agnus castus Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Black Cohosh and Night Sweats Type 1 Diabetes and Hypoglycemia Black Cohosh and Menopause Type 1 Diabetes and Autoimmune Disease Black Cohosh and HRT Type 1 Diabetes and Worried Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions | Everyday Health

Black Cohosh - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions | Everyday Health

Black cohosh is an herb also known as Actaea racemosa, Acte Grappes Noires, Acte Noire, Aristolochiaceae Noire, Baie d'acte, Baneberry, Black Snakeroot, Bugwort, Cimicaire Grappes, Cimicifuga, Cytise, Herbe aux Punaises, Macrotys, Phytoestrogen, Racine de Serpent, Rattlesnake Root, Rhizoma Cimicifugae, Sheng Ma, Squaw Root, and many other names. Black cohosh should not be confused with blue cohosh or white cohosh. Blue cohosh can have harmful effects on the heart. Black cohosh has been used in alternative medicine in a specific preparation called Remifemin as a possibly effective aid in REDUCING the frequency of hot flashes caused by menopause. Other uses not proven with research have included premenstrual syndrome (PMS), infertility, breast cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, rheumatism, migraine headaches, mental function, and many other conditions. It is not certain whether black cohosh is effective in treating any medical condition. Medicinal use of this product has not been approved by the FDA. Black cohosh should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor. Black cohosh is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination. Black cohosh may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide. Follow all directions on the product label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use. Before using black cohosh, talk to your healthcare provider. You may not be able to use black co Continue reading >>

Menopause

Menopause

What to Expect, How to Cope For most women, menopause—the cessation of menstrual periods—is a normal, natural occurrence. The average age at menopause is 51, although any time after 40 is considered normal. The years leading up to the menopausal transition—a time known as the perimenopause—may be characterized by changes in the menstrual period, hot flashes (a sudden feeling of warmth, sometimes accompanied by sweating), emotional ups and downs, sleep disturbances, and vaginal dryness. Some of these symptoms may continue after menopause. The severity of symptoms varies dramatically from person to person, ranging from barely noticeable menstrual changes to an experience described as debilitating. Women who experience menopause abruptly because of the surgical removal of their ovaries (called surgical menopause) typically have much more severe symptoms than women who experience a natural menopause. Both the perimenopausal and postmenopausal periods may present additional challenges for women who have diabetes. For one thing, the hormonal fluctuations that are common to perimenopause can affect blood glucose levels. For another, some symptoms of menopause are the same as or easily confused with the symptoms of high or low blood glucose levels, so the cause must be determined before corrective action can be taken. In addition, both diabetes and menopause raise a woman’s risk of osteoporosis, so women with diabetes must be proactive about taking steps to keep their bones strong. Lack of sleep, whether related to menopause, stress, or something else, can disrupt diabetes control. And menopause is often associated with weight gain, which can make blood glucose control more difficult. The menopausal process A woman is said to be postmenopausal one year after her final Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh Benefits And Side Effects

Black Cohosh Benefits And Side Effects

In the past, Black cohosh was used for circulatory problems, rheumatism, arthritis and to reduce cholesterol. Now it is most well known for its use by women to treat the symptoms of menopause. Black Cohosh has shown to be very effective in treating PMS, menstrual cramps and the complaints associated with menopause, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness and fatigue. Because of its estrogenic effect, Black Cohosh has become a popular alternative to hormone replacement therapy. German researchers have confirmed that Black Cohosh contains phyto-estrogenic compounds that act like estrogen. These compounds connect to estrogen receptors and decrease LH (Luteinizing hormone) in the body. This is what restores the balance of hormones in the body and controls menopausal symptoms. Black Cohosh is also used to treat high blood pressure and has anti-inflammatory activity as well as bone preserving properties. Do not confuse Black Cohosh with blue cohosh or white cohosh. They are toxic and should never be taken. Always make sure you are getting Black Cohosh. Even Black Cohosh can be poisonous if taken in large doses. Always follow the dosage instructions on the bottle when taking. Even though there are many benefits of taking Black Cohosh, there may be significant risks as well. Some researchers believe that this herb causes the immune system to attack the liver, causing inflammation (autoimmune hepatitis). People with this disease can have aching joints, abdominal pain and yellow, itchy skin. Without medical treatment, this illness may cause death. Some reports suggest that people taking Black Cohosh seem to develop liver disease more often that people not taking it. It is believed to cause other liver trouble as well. Much more research needs to be done to determine the safety of t Continue reading >>

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes cases in the developing world and it is still increasing in an alarm rate. In 2016, it is estimated that 1 in 10 US individuals have type 2 diabetes (the increase rate of type 1 diabetes is much smaller). By 2050, it is estimated that 1 in 3 individuals will suffer from type 2 diabetes. From the statistics, overweight individuals who are age 40 or older are in the highest risk percentile. How does this information important for women? In the United States, diabetes is ranked as the number 6 most common cause of death for females between 45 to 54 years old and the number 4 common cause of death for females who are between 55 to 64 years old. It seems that as women grow older and reach their menopause stage, they become much more susceptible to develop diabetes. The question is whether menopause can drastically increase the risk of developing diabetes? This article will answer this question along with covering various topics that concerns menopause and its effect on diabetes: Can Menopause Can Trigger Diabetes? We would like to give you a straightforward answer for this question. However, sadly, health research scientists are still struggling to find the answer because it is difficult to separate the correlation and effects of menopause from the correlation and effects of age and weight. In 2011, a scientific correlation study suggests that after taking the age factor out from the correlation study, there is “no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk” (Kim, 2011). Yet there have been studies suggesting that progesterone is correlated with the development diabetes. Although we cannot give you a straight yes or Continue reading >>

Menopausal And Type 1

Menopausal And Type 1

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Is there any women out there who can share how it is for them as i need to know I'm not on my own! If there is a professional who sees this, would you be able to give me some direction please. It's potentially a real problem for a Type 1. The first thing that happened to me was crazy BS levels. Still remember the first time. I was at work and did a blood test before my insuin and my lunch. It was 4.6 and just a routine check. After my insulin and my lunch, (took the mimimum half hour) I re-started work. After about an hour began to feel odd and thirsty. Did blood test. Above 22. Decided to leave as soon as I could, about an hour and a half later. (I was on flexi-time.) Wondered if I had a virus. Once home, fished out info about D and the menopause. Levels suddenly fell to near normal again. This kept on happening. My GP was zero help. My husband strong-armed me and forced me to drink Lucozade in the middle of the night the first time I had a hot flush in bed, but of course I wasn't hypo - just way too hot. He remembered when I had been pregnant and the state I was in then, when I was frequently hypo at night, so he was convinced that was the problem. The answer proved to be HRT suggested by the diabetic clinic at the hospital. They explained that the constantly shifting hormone levels usually only affect glucose levels for a couple of years, but this was news to my GP who had never heard of HRT to stabilise glucose levels. I should explain I was on no treatment for anythi Continue reading >>

Menopause And Type 1

Menopause And Type 1

I'm wondering how many type 1 women who have gone through menopause, are going through menopause have had similar problems to mine. So far, my doctor hasn't found anyone else with my problems. My first problems aren't really related to my diabetes, they are food related. I have a list of over 30 items which I can no longer eat because they cause my abdomen to extend. Onions, carrots, cherries, red grapes, are a few of the items. If I don't know something contains one of the food items and I eat a great deal of it, my legs and calves will swell up. My cheeks will also become red. I will get diarrhea, sometimes 5 minutes after eating. I never had any of these problems until menopause. The problems that are related to my diabetes. I take 3-4 injections of N and R Humulin insulin a day, except for certain times a month. AND this time changes. it isn't exactly 28 days. It can be 20, 25, 28, 32, or 40 days. I never know when it's going to happen. My pre-supper and bedtime insulin requirements stay the same until the hormones decide to go wacky. Then, I'll have an insulin reaction (hypo- anywhere from 28-45) in the middle of the night (1-3am). It took us some time, but we finally figured out the pattern. I used to go low two nights in a row, now it's only one. Even if I've eaten more than enough cover my insulin reaction, I'll be low (35-60) fasting. So I now have to cut out my 3-4 units of N insulin at bedtime and I have to cut back my pre-supper insulin. I go from 20 units of the N insulin to 3-4 units. This will last up to 2 weeks. Then my fasting blood sugars will start to raise so I have to start raising my pre-supper N insulin. I can't immediately go back to my normal levels because that can cause more night-time insulin reactions. During these times, my blood sugars al Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh | Nccih

Black Cohosh | Nccih

This fact sheet provides basic information about black cohoshcommon names, usefulness and safety, and resources for moreinformation. Common Names: black cohosh, black snakeroot, macrotys, bugbane, bugwort, rattleroot,rattleweed Black cohosh, a member of the buttercup family, is a plant native to North America. Native American and Chinese herbalists have traditionally used black cohosh for a variety of ailments and as an insectrepellent. Currently, people use black cohosh as a dietary supplement for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. Its also been used as a dietary supplement for other conditions, including menstrual cramps and premenstrual syndrome, and to inducelabor. The part of the black cohosh plant used in herbal preparations is the root or rhizome (underground stem). Black cohosh is sold as the dried root, in tablets and capsules, and as anextract. Black cohosh has been studied for menopause symptoms in people, but most of the studies were not of the highest quality. Therefore, knowledge of the effects of black cohosh islimited. Studies that tested black cohosh for menopause symptoms have had inconsistent results. The overall evidence is insufficient to support using black cohosh for thispurpose. There are not enough reliable data to show whether black cohosh is effective for otheruses. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) is funding research to identify active components in black cohosh and understand their effects in thebody. In clinical trials, people have taken black cohosh for as long as 12 months with no serious harmful effects. The only reported side effects were minor problems such as upset stomach orrashes. Some commercial black cohosh products have been found to contain the wrong herb or to contain mixtures of bla Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh - Oral Side Effects, Medical Uses, And Drug Interactions.

Black Cohosh - Oral Side Effects, Medical Uses, And Drug Interactions.

Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: Black cohosh has been used for symptoms of menopause (e.g., hot flashes ).Some herbal/ diet supplement products have been found to contain possibly harmful impurities/additives. Check with your pharmacist for more details about the brand you use.The FDA has not reviewed this product for safety or effectiveness. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details. HOW TO USE: Take this product by mouth as directed. Follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.This herbal product should not be used for more than 6 months.If your condition persists or worsens, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention. SIDE EFFECTS: Headache , stomach upset, nausea , vomiting , weight gain , vaginal spotting/bleeding, and dizziness may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, contact your doctor promptly.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: muscle pain / weakness .This product may rarely cause serious (possibly fatal) liver disease . Stop taking this product and consult your doctor immediately if you develop symptoms of liver injury, including persistent nausea , loss of appetite , unusual tiredness , stomach/ abdominal pain , pale stools, dark urine , yellowing eyes/skin.A very serious allergic reaction to this product is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any of the following symptoms of a serious allergic reaction: rash , itching /swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness , trouble breathing .This is not a complete list of p Continue reading >>

Effects Of High-dose Isoflavones On Metabolic And Inflammatory Markers In Healthy Postmenopausal Women

Effects Of High-dose Isoflavones On Metabolic And Inflammatory Markers In Healthy Postmenopausal Women

Effects of High-Dose Isoflavones on Metabolic and Inflammatory Markers in Healthy Postmenopausal Women 1Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, Diabetes Section, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD. 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Correspondence: Shehzad Basaria, MD Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Bayview Medical Center 5200 Eastern Ave, Mason F. Lord Bldg, Center Tower, Suite 4300 Baltimore, MD 21224 Tel: 410-550-4229 Fax: 410-550-6864 E-mail: [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Menopause See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. After menopause, women experience changes in body composition, especially increase in fat mass. Additionally, advancing age, decreased physical activity and increased inflammation may predispose them to develop type-2 diabetes. Isoflavones have been shown to improve metabolic parameters in postmenopausal women. However, the effect of isoflavones on adipo-cytokines remains unclear. To evaluate the effect of high dose isoflavones on inflammatory and metabolic markers in postmenopausal women. We measured glucose, insulin and adipokines/cytokines in 75 healthy postmenopausal women who were randomized to receive 20 gm of soy protein with 160 mg of total isoflavones (64mg genistein, 63 mg diadzein, 34 mg glycitein) or 20 gm of soy protein placebo for 12 weeks. Women on estrogen discontinued therapy at least three months prior to the study. The supplements were given in a powder form and consumed once daily with milk or other beverages. Mean age in the placebo and active groups was similar (p=0.4). Av Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Black Cohosh Therapies On Lipids, Fibrinogen, Glucose And Insulin.

The Effects Of Black Cohosh Therapies On Lipids, Fibrinogen, Glucose And Insulin.

1. Maturitas. 2007 Jun 20;57(2):195-204. Epub 2007 Feb 1. The effects of black cohosh therapies on lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin. Spangler L(1), Newton KM, Grothaus LC, Reed SD, Ehrlich K, LaCroix AZ. (1)Center for Health Studies, Group Health, Seattle, WA 98101, USA. [email protected] OBJECTIVE: Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) is an herb commonly used to treatmenopausal symptoms. Little is known about its effect on other physiologicparameters that could result in untoward events. This study examines the effectof black cohosh on lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin.METHODS: Three hundred and fifty-one, 45-55 years old, peri or post-menopausalwomen experiencing vasomotor symptoms participated in a 3-month, double blindtrial with randomization to: (1) black cohosh (160 mg daily); (2) multibotanical including black cohosh (200 mg daily); (3) multibotanical plus soy dietcounseling; (4) conjugated equine estrogen .625 mg, with or withoutmedroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5mg daily, for women with or without a uterus,respectively; (5) placebo. Baseline and month 3 total cholesterol, high densitylipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol(calculated), triglyceride, insulin, glucose, and fibrinogen serum concentrationswere measured in 310 women. Baseline information was also collected on medicalhistory, demographic characteristics, and diet.RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in the adjusted meanchange from baseline to 3 months between the herbal groups and placebo in totalcholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. Adjusted fibrinogenlevels appear to increase in the multibotanical treatment group in comparisonwith the other herbal groups and placebo overall (P = .02), but there was nostatistically s Continue reading >>

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