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Black Cohosh And Metformin

Metformin And Black Cohosh Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Metformin And Black Cohosh Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Metformin and Black cohosh drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported among people who take Metformin and Black cohosh together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Metformin and Black cohosh. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 68 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. 68 people who take Metformin, Black cohosh are studied. Most common drug interactions over time *: Most common drug interactions by gender *: Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Deep vein thrombosis (blood clot in a major vein that usually develops in the legs and/or pelvis) Bradycardia (abnormally slow heart action) Hiatus hernia (hernia resulting from the protrusion of part of the stomach through the diaphragm) Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit) * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. Connect with people like you, or share your experience to help people like you Print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Want to find out more about the FDA reports used in the study? You can request them from FDA. Metformin has active ingredients of metformin hydrochloride. It is often used in diabetes. ( latest outcomes from Metformin 206,762 users ) Black cohosh has active ingredients of black cohosh. It is often used in menopause. ( latest outcomes from Black cohosh 745 users ) Interactions between Metformin and drugs from A to Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Interactions between Black cohosh and drugs from A to Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Browse all drug interactions of Metformin and Black cohosh Related publications that referenced our stud Continue reading >>

Herbs To Avoid On Metformin

Herbs To Avoid On Metformin

Metformin is usually prescribed for Type 2 diabetes patients who have trouble maintaining consistent blood sugar levels. As a general rule, it is unsafe to take any herbs, supplements or vitamins while taking metformin unless you have the express approval of your doctor. Many of these over-the-counter substances can lower your blood sugar too much or make the metformin less effective in controlling your blood sugar. Before taking any herbs with this medication, talk to your doctor and pharmacist to ensure safety. Video of the Day Metformin is a type of antidiabetic drug called a biguanide. It is used primarily to lower blood sugar in Type 2 diabetics, but it is also used to treat the side effects of polycystic ovarian syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Some side effects include headache, muscle pain, weakness, mild nausea, vomiting, gas and diarrhea. Take this medication with a meal to avoid some of these side effects, and you should take vitamin B-12 to avoid the deficiency metformin can sometimes cause. Some supplements and herbs lower your blood sugar and can make it drop too low when you're taking metformin. Herbs and supplements in this category include ipriflavone, chromium, ginseng, magnesium, vanadium, aloe, bitter melon, bilberry, burdock, dandelion, fenugreek, garlic, gymnema, lipoic acid and carmitine. St. John's wort and Dong quai can increase the sun sensitivity caused by metformin. Guar gum can interfere with the medication's absorption, and gingko biloba combined with metformin made glucose tolerance worse in patients -- their blood sugars remained higher with the combination. Metformin interacts with many prescription drugs, as well. Tell you doctor if you take the water pill Lasix, the heart medication digoxin or the antibiotic vancomycin. O Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh Effectiveness, How It Works, And Drug Interactions On Emedicinehealth - Are There Any Interactions With Medications?

Black Cohosh Effectiveness, How It Works, And Drug Interactions On Emedicinehealth - Are There Any Interactions With Medications?

Are there any interactions with medications? Are there any interactions with medications? Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. There is concern that black cohosh might harm the liver. Taking black cohosh with atorvastatin (Lipitor) might increase the chance of liver damage. However, there is not enough scientific information to know if this is an important concern. Before taking black cohosh talk to your healthcare provider if you take atorvastatin (Lipitor). Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Cisplatin (Platinol-AQ) is used to treat cancer. There is some concern that black cohosh might decrease how well cisplatin (Platinol-AQ) works for cancer. Do not take black cohosh if you are taking cisplatin (Platinol-AQ). Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) substrates) Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Black cohosh might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking black cohosh along with some medications that are change by the liver may increase the effects and side effects of your medication. Before taking black cohosh talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver. Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs) Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. There is concern that black cohosh might harm the liver. Taking black cohosh along with medication that might also harm the liver can increase the risk of liver damage. Do not take black cohosh if you are taking a medication that can harm the liver. Medications moved by transporters in cells (Organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) substrates) Interaction R Continue reading >>

Herbs, Supplements, And Prescription Drugs

Herbs, Supplements, And Prescription Drugs

Herbs, Supplements, and Prescription Drugs Updated On Apr 24, 2015 Published On July 18, 2012 Written By Jonathan E. Prousky, ND, MSc Many Canadians take natural health products as well as prescription medications. Learn which herbs and supplements react with medication, potentially causing serious drug interactions. More than 12 percent of Canadians use complementary and alternative medicine services annually. As a result, many Canadians take natural health products (NHPs) alongside prescription medications, making themselves vulnerable to potential adverse reactions and druginteractions. Patients are best served when they disclose the NHPs and medications they are taking to their health care practitioners. Vitamins; minerals; amino acids; and essential fatty acids, such as evening primrose oil, flaxseed oil, and fish oil generally pose fewer risks when combined with medications. They are normally found in the human body, where they facilitate regular biochemical and physiological functionality. Concerns have been raised about fish oil combined with doses of more than 400 IU vitamin E per day, since both thin the blood and each must be used with caution when combined with medications such as warfarin. Other genuine concerns involve the combined use of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) or tryptophan with antidepressant medications. While both 5-HTP and tryptophan are very safe, if combined with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs) or even St. Johns wort, they could cause serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening drug reaction that occurs when the body has too much serotonin. Deciding whether to take a herbal product with a medication is more complicated. If individuals are not under the care of a knowledgeable health care practitioner, then the Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh Drug Interactions

Black Cohosh Drug Interactions

A total of 441 drugs (2222 brand and generic names) are known to interact with black cohosh . 5 major drug interactions (10 brand and generic names) 434 moderate drug interactions (2205 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (7 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with black cohosh. Common medications checked in combination with black cohosh Type in a drug name and select a drug from the list. The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables. Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that Continue reading >>

Interactions Between Herbs And Conventional Drugs: Overview Of The Clinical Data

Interactions Between Herbs And Conventional Drugs: Overview Of The Clinical Data

Interactions between Herbs and Conventional Drugs: Overview of the Clinical Data Department of Experimental Pharmacology, Federico II University of Naples Tel. +39 081 678 439, E-Mail [email protected] This article provides an overview of the clinical evidence of interactions between herbal and conventional medicines. Herbs involved in drug interactions or that have been evaluated in pharmacokinetic trials are discussed in this review. While many of the interactions reported are of limited clinical significance and many herbal products (e.g. black cohosh, saw palmetto, echinacea, hawthorn and valerian) seem to expose patients to minor risk under conventional pharmacotherapy, a few herbs, notably St. Johns wort, may provoke adverse events sufficiently serious to endanger the patients health. Healthcare professionals should remain vigilant for potential interactions between herbal medicines and prescribed drugs, especially when drugs with a narrow therapeutic index are used. According to the World Health Organisation, herbal medicines are defined as finished, labelled medicinal products that contain as active ingredients aerial or underground parts of plants, or other plant material, or combinations thereof, whether in the crude state or as plant preparations. Plant material includes juices, gums, fatty oils, essential oils, and any other substances of this nature. Herbal medicines may contain excipients in addition to the active ingredients. Medicines containing plant material combined with chemically defined active substances, including chemically defined, isolated constituents of plants, are not considered to be herbal medicines [ 1 ]. Thus, herbal medicines contain a combination of pharmacologically active plant constituents that are claimed to work synergistically to Continue reading >>

Aarp's Health Tools

Aarp's Health Tools

Actaea macrotys, Actaea pachypoda, Actaea podocarpa, Actaea racemosa L., Actaea rubra actaealactone, actee a grappes (French), amerikanisches Wanzenkraut (German), Appalachian bugbane , BCE, baneberry , black bugbane, black cohosh root extract Cr 99, black cohosh roots, black snakeroot, botrophis serpentaria, bugbane, bugwort, CR, CR BNO 1055, CR extract, caffeic acid, Cimicifuga, Cimicifuga racemosa, Cimicifugae racemosae rhizoma, Cimicifugawurzelstock (German), cimicifugic acid A, cimicifugic acid B, cimicifugic acid D, cimicifugic acid E, cimicifugic acid F, cimicifugic acid G, cohosh bugbane, ferulic acid, fukinolic acid, herbe au punaise (French), ICR, isoferulic acid, isopropanolic black cohosh extract, isopropanolic extract, macrotys, Macrotys actaeoides, methyl caffeate, mountain bugbane, p-coumaric acid, phytoestrogen, protocatechualdehyde, protocatechuic acid, Ranunculaceae (family), rattle root, rattle snakeroot, rattlesnake root, rattle top, rattle weed, rattleweed, Remifemin, rhizoma actaeae, rich weed, richweed, schwarze Schlangenwurzel (German), snakeroot, solvlys, squaw root, squawroot, Thalictrodes racemosa, Traubensilberkerze (German), triterpene glycosides, Wanzenkraut (German), Ze 450. Note: Do not confuse black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) with blue cohosh ( Caulophyllum thalictroides ), which contains chemicals that may damage the heart and raise blood pressure. Do not confuse black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa) with Cimicifuga foetida, bugbane, fairy candles, or sheng ma; these are species from the same family (Ranunculaceae) with different effects. Black cohosh is popular as an alternative to hormonal therapy in the treatment of menopausal (climacteric) symptoms such as hot flashes, mood disturbances, diaphoresis, palpitations, and vaginal drynes Continue reading >>

I Have Type 2 Diabetes And I Take Metformin. Is Black Cohosh

I Have Type 2 Diabetes And I Take Metformin. Is Black Cohosh

I have type 2 diabetes and i take metformin. Is black cohosh i have type 2 diabetes and i take metformin. Is black cohosh safe for me to take? Black cohosh is an herb used as a dietary supplement.It is used primarily for hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms. As this is not a medicine & is a supplement,the FDA has not reviewed this product for safety or effectiveness. In general there is no study done which proves that black cohosh is not safe for diabetics or there is any drug interaction of black cohosh with metformin or any other anti diabetic medication. So I conclude to say that you can take it safely. Please feel free to ask if you have any other question. Please click green ACCEPT BUTTON so I can be paid for assisting you. BONUS and Positive Feedback are always greatly appreciated. doctor_charles and 87 other Medical Specialists are ready to help you A new question is answered every 9 seconds Ask an ExpertExperts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm. Get a Professional AnswerVia email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to. 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeRate the answer you receive. Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com. JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance. Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent. Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from Continue reading >>

Does Black Cohosh Interact With Metformin? Complete Overview | Treato

Does Black Cohosh Interact With Metformin? Complete Overview | Treato

Black Cohosh and Hot Flashes Metformin and PCOS Black Cohosh and Agnus castus Metformin and Diabetes Black Cohosh and Night Sweats Metformin and Clomid Black Cohosh and Menopause Metformin and Weight Loss Black Cohosh and HRT Metformin and Pregnancy Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Beware Of Metformin And Black Cohosh Side Effects...

Beware Of Metformin And Black Cohosh Side Effects...

I'm an old timer here on the boards, not sure how many of you remember me...anyways, I'm just about to hang up my old fertility hat and move on...however I find myself dealing with what I believe is a side effect from some of the drugs/supplements I took in order to improve my chances of getting pregnant. I took metformin (which got me pg for 8 weeks only) and continued to take it for under 1 year and I also took Black Cohosh. Apparently both can have an impact on your liver. I now have a nodule on my liver which was seen during an ultrasound (intuition told me something was wrong) and I'm going to follow this up with blood work with RE and family physician will have me repeat the ultrasound in 3 months time. So, as I had always feared, repercussions on my health - and no baby to show for it. I just wanted to share this with you all..... I'm an old timer here on the boards, not sure how many of you remember me...anyways, I'm just about to hang up my old fertility hat and move on...however I find myself dealing with what I believe is a side effect from some of the drugs/supplements I took in order to improve my chances of getting pregnant. I took metformin (which got me pg for 8 weeks only) and continued to take it for under 1 year and I also took Black Cohosh. Apparently both can have an impact on your liver. I now have a nodule on my liver which was seen during an ultrasound (intuition told me something was wrong) and I'm going to follow this up with blood work with RE and family physician will have me repeat the ultrasound in 3 months time. So, as I had always feared, repercussions on my health - and no baby to show for it. I just wanted to share this with you all..... I worry about DHEA and my liver. Did you have any symptoms? Hope your follow up tests show it's not Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh - Oral Side Effects, Medical Uses, And Drug Interactions.

Black Cohosh - Oral Side Effects, Medical Uses, And Drug Interactions.

Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: Black cohosh has been used for symptoms of menopause (e.g., hot flashes ).Some herbal/ diet supplement products have been found to contain possibly harmful impurities/additives. Check with your pharmacist for more details about the brand you use.The FDA has not reviewed this product for safety or effectiveness. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details. HOW TO USE: Take this product by mouth as directed. Follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.This herbal product should not be used for more than 6 months.If your condition persists or worsens, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention. SIDE EFFECTS: Headache , stomach upset, nausea , vomiting , weight gain , vaginal spotting/bleeding, and dizziness may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, contact your doctor promptly.Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: muscle pain / weakness .This product may rarely cause serious (possibly fatal) liver disease . Stop taking this product and consult your doctor immediately if you develop symptoms of liver injury, including persistent nausea , loss of appetite , unusual tiredness , stomach/ abdominal pain , pale stools, dark urine , yellowing eyes/skin.A very serious allergic reaction to this product is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any of the following symptoms of a serious allergic reaction: rash , itching /swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness , trouble breathing .This is not a complete list of p Continue reading >>

Alternative To Clomid?

Alternative To Clomid?

Home > Fertility > Alternative to Clomid? Many patients ask if there is a natural alternative to Clomid. The short answer is that many natural treatments work just as well as, and in the vast majority of cases, MUCH better than Clomid. Clomid is a first-line drug used to treat infertility. It is often used in cases of PCOS with delayed or absent ovulation and in unexplained infertility, as the very first drug intervention. Clomid (also known as clomiphene), is a selective estrogen receptor modulator. It works by inhibiting the estrogen receptors in the hypothalamus (the area of the brain that controls the reproductive hormones). Normally, estrogen is produced by the follicles or eggs as they grow and develop in a womans menstrual cycle. The estrogen levels increase as the follicle gets bigger and approaches the time of ovulation. The hypothalamus messages the pituitary gland to produce gonadotropins, the hormones that stimulate the egg to grow, produce estrogen and eventually rupture in ovulation. By cycle day 22, the estrogen and progesterone levels are quite elevated. The hypothalamus senses the high levels of hormones and stops stimulating the pituitary, preventing follicles from continuing to grow when implantation of a fertilized embryo should be happening. When Clomid is used (usually for 5 days starting at day 5 of the cycle), the follicle grows as usual early in the cycle. However, the hypothalamus does not detect the high estrogen because Clomid blocks its estrogen receptors. Rather than slowing the production of gonadotrophins as it normally would, it continues to secrete more of them in a rapid pulsatile pattern, fooled by the low estrogen into thinking that the follicle needs more help to develop. This is the stimulation process of Clomid, which can sometim Continue reading >>

Question For Women

Question For Women "of A Certain Age"............

Question for women "of a certain age"............ Member Type 2 - after a long period of denial! Question for women "of a certain age"............ Anybody experienced a lessening or complete absence of existing "hot flashes" while on Januvia? Mine completely disappeared while I was on it. I discontinued it and went to a higher dose of Met because I didn't like the way I felt otherwise while on Januvia and now the flashes are back with a vengeance! Maybe Januvia kept my BG levels on a more even keel? Am going back to the doc on Monday but just wondered if anyone else has experienced something similar. Ummm...not sure if this will help you or not. I was on 500mg Metformin ER for about 7wks & my hot flashes had stopped BEFORE I took the Metformin & once I started the Metformin they came back with a vengence, much more often & much worse. So maybe it's the Met that's doing it to you? I've been off of the Met for a few days now & I still am having them, but much less often & not as intense. I take Black Cohosh to help w/my hot flashes & if I didn't have other side effect from the Metformin, I may have tried increasing the Black Cohosh, but the Met really did a number on me & I had to quit taking it. Good luck- hot flashes are the pits! Continue reading >>

Which Herbal Medications Interact With Diabetes ... | Diabetic Connect

Which Herbal Medications Interact With Diabetes ... | Diabetic Connect

OH, I thought that since herbal medicines were "all natural" they couldn't do me any harm!!!! (tongue FIRMLY planted in cheek) I guess that's not so? Mays, my former boss is a Certified Holistic Health Nurse as well as an RN. One day I was reading an article on yahoo about the benefits of herbal medications. I printed it out for her to read. She read it and threw it in the trash. The first thing she said was do not believe anything in the article and proceeded to tell us that if you want to use herbal medications you should speak to a Certified Holistic Health Nurse or Holistic Health Educator before taking them. When you make the appointment take all of your prescribed medications with you as they will tell you what herbal medications you can take with the medications you are on and that you should make sure you speak with your doctor about weaning you off your meds before you start taking herbal supplements. She also recommended the best books on the market to use when starting a herbal supplements. If you take Coumadin, your doctor should give you a list of veggies you can't eat when taking this medication. My moms doctor and my aunts doctor provided them a list when they were taking it. Continue reading >>

9 Health Benefits Of Black Cohosh- With Side Effects

9 Health Benefits Of Black Cohosh- With Side Effects

Home Natural Substances Herbs 9 Health Benefits of Black Cohosh- with Side Effects 9 Health Benefits of Black Cohosh- with Side Effects Black cohosh is a medicinal plant native from eastern North America. Known for its anti-inflammatory, sedative, and pain-relieving properties, black cohosh has the potential to reduce common menopause symptoms. Read further to know more about the benefits and side effects of black cohosh. Common names: Baneberry, black cohosh, black snakeroot, bugbane, cimicifuga, rattleroot, rattleweed, rattletop, traubensilberberze, squawroot, and wanzenkraut. Actaea racemosa, also known as black cohosh, is a medicinal plant from the Ranunculaceae family, and native from Eastern North America. Before the arrival of the Europeans, Native Americans used black cohosh to relieve various disorders including several conditions unique to women such as menopause and amenorrhea [ R , R ]. Black cohosh became an official drug in the United States Pharmacopeia in 1820. Yet, black cohosh grew in popularity in 1844 when Dr. John King, an eclectic physician, published its use as a treatment for a variety of conditions including chronical ovaritis, endometriosis, and menstrual derangements [ R ]. Today, black cohosh is still used to treat several disorders like anxiety and menopausal symptoms. However, there is an ongoing debate on the efficiency of black cohosh to treat these conditions [ R ]. The key medical components in black cohosh include triterpene glycosides, phenolic acids, flavonoids, volatile oils, and tannins. Actein is found in the roots of black cohosh and can inhibit the growth of breast tumors, giving black cohosh anti- cancer effects [ R ]. 23-epi-26-deoxyactein is similar to actein, and this compound is a triterpene glycoside that can be extracted Continue reading >>

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