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Black Cohosh And Insulin

The Effects Of Black Cohosh Therapies On Lipids, Fibrinogen, Glucose And Insulin | Louis Grothaus - Academia.edu

The Effects Of Black Cohosh Therapies On Lipids, Fibrinogen, Glucose And Insulin | Louis Grothaus - Academia.edu

The effects of black cohosh therapies on lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin Maturitas 57 (2007) 195204 The effects of black cohosh therapies on lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin Leslie Spangler a, , Katherine M. Newton a,b , Louis C. Grothaus a , Susan D. Reed a,b,c,d , Kelly Ehrlich a , Andrea Z. LaCroix a,b,c a Center for Health Studies, Group Health, Seattle, WA, United States bDepartment of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States c Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States d Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States Received 18 September 2006; received in revised form 6 December 2006; accepted 2 January 2007AbstractObjective: Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) is an herb commonly used to treat menopausal symptoms. Little is known aboutits effect on other physiologic parameters that could result in untoward events. This study examines the effect of black cohoshon lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin.Methods: Three hundred and fifty-one, 4555 years old, peri or post-menopausal women experiencing vasomotor symptomsparticipated in a 3-month, double blind trial with randomization to: (1) black cohosh (160 mg daily); (2) multibotanical includingblack cohosh (200 mg daily); (3) multibotanical plus soy diet counseling; (4) conjugated equine estrogen .625 mg, with or withoutmedroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5 mg daily, for women with or without a uterus, respectively; (5) placebo. Baseline and month 3total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (calculated), triglyceride,insulin, glucose, and fibrinogen serum concentrations were measured in 310 women. Bas Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh Drug Interactions

Black Cohosh Drug Interactions

A total of 441 drugs (2222 brand and generic names) are known to interact with black cohosh . 5 major drug interactions (10 brand and generic names) 434 moderate drug interactions (2205 brand and generic names) 2 minor drug interactions (7 brand and generic names) Show all medications in the database that may interact with black cohosh. Common medications checked in combination with black cohosh Type in a drug name and select a drug from the list. The classifications below are a general guideline only. It is difficult to determine the relevance of a particular drug interaction to any individual given the large number of variables. Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit. Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances. Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan. Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh - Miscarriage Research

Black Cohosh - Miscarriage Research

Black cohosh from days 1 to 12 improved pregnancy rate by 170%, boosts progesterone Patients with unexplained infertility and recurrent clomiphene citrate induction failure, were randomly divided into two groups. Both groups received clomiphene citrate 150 mg per day (days 3 to 7). Group I received additional oral phytoestrogen (Cimicifuga racemosa - black cohosh) 120 mg/day from days 1 to 12. There was a non-significant shortening of induction cycles in group I. Oestradiol and LH concentrations were higher in group I compared with group II. Endometrial thickness, serum progesterone and clinical pregnancy rate were significantly higher in group I (8.9 versus 7.5; 13.3 ng/ml versus 9.3 ng/ml; 36.7% versus 13.6%, respectively). It is concluded that adding Cimicifuga racemosa rhizome dry extract to clomiphene citrate induction can improve the pregnancy rate and cycle outcomes in these couples. Black cohosh raises luteal-phase progesterone This study compared follicular-phase supplementation with either phytoestrogen (in the form of cimicifuga racemosa - black cohosh) or ethinyl estradiol in clomiphene citrate induction cycles for the treatment of unexplained infertility. The phytoestrogen group needed significantly fewer days for adequate follicular maturation, had a thicker endometrium and higher estradiol concentration at the time of human chorionic gonadotrophin injection. The phytoestrogen group had higher luteal-phase serum progesterone compared with the ethinyl estradiol group. No significant difference was found regarding clinical pregnancy rates (14.0% versus 21.1%, respectively). In conclusion, the cycle characteristics in unexplained infertility women treated with clomiphene citrate induction and timed intercourse improved after follicular-phase supplementation

The Effects Of Black Cohosh Therapies On Lipids, Fibrinogen, Glucose And Insulin

The Effects Of Black Cohosh Therapies On Lipids, Fibrinogen, Glucose And Insulin

Volume 57, Issue 2 , 20 June 2007, Pages 195-204 The effects of black cohosh therapies on lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin Author links open overlay panel LeslieSpanglera Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) is an herb commonly used to treat menopausal symptoms. Little is known about its effect on other physiologic parameters that could result in untoward events. This study examines the effect of black cohosh on lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin. Three hundred and fifty-one, 4555 years old, peri or post-menopausal women experiencing vasomotor symptoms participated in a 3-month, double blind trial with randomization to: (1) black cohosh (160mg daily); (2) multibotanical including black cohosh (200mg daily); (3) multibotanical plus soy diet counseling; (4) conjugated equine estrogen .625mg, with or without medroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5mg daily, for women with or without a uterus, respectively; (5) placebo. Baseline and month 3 total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (calculated), triglyceride, insulin, glucose, and fibrinogen serum concentrations were measured in 310 women. Baseline information was also collected on medical history, demographic characteristics, and diet. There were no statistically significant differences in the adjusted mean change from baseline to 3 months between the herbal groups and placebo in total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. Adjusted fibrinogen levels appear to increase in the multibotanical treatment group in comparison with the other herbal groups and placebo overall (P=.02), but there was no statistically significant difference in the pairwise test against placebo (P=.11). Black cohosh containing therapies had no demonstrable effects on lip Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh | Hca Healthcare

Black Cohosh | Hca Healthcare

DISCLAIMER: This Health Library is for educational purposes only and does not necessarily reflect the services provided by this practice/facility. What Is Black Cohosh Used for Today? What Is the Scientific Evidence for Black Cohosh? Dosage Safety Issues Interactions You Should Know About References Black cohosh is a tall perennial herb originally found in the northeastern United States. Native Americans used it primarily for women's health problems, but also as a treatment for arthritis, fatigue, and snakebite. European colonists rapidly adopted the herb for similar uses. In the late nineteenth century, black cohosh was the principal ingredient in the wildly popular Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound for menstrual cramps. Black cohoshs main use today is for the treatment of menopausal symptoms . Meaningful but far from definitive evidence indicates that black cohosh extract might reduce hot flashes as well as other symptoms of menopause. In the past, black cohosh was believed to be a phytoestrogen, a plant-based substance that has actions similar to estrogen. However, as we describe below, growing evidence indicates that black cohosh does not have general estrogen-like actions. Rather, it may act like estrogen only in certain places: the brain (reducing hot flashes), bone (potentially fighting osteoporosis), and vagina (reducing vaginal dryness). Black cohosh has also been tried for reducing hot flashes in women who have undergone surgery for breast cancer , but it does not appear to be effective for this purpose. Finally, black cohosh is sometimes recommended as a kind of general womens herb, said to be effective for a variety of menstrual issues, such as dysmenorrhea , premenstrual syndrome (PMS) , and irregular menstruation. However, there is as yet no meaningfu Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Black Cohosh Therapies On Lipids, Fibrinogen, Glucose And Insulin.

The Effects Of Black Cohosh Therapies On Lipids, Fibrinogen, Glucose And Insulin.

1. Maturitas. 2007 Jun 20;57(2):195-204. Epub 2007 Feb 1. The effects of black cohosh therapies on lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin. Spangler L(1), Newton KM, Grothaus LC, Reed SD, Ehrlich K, LaCroix AZ. (1)Center for Health Studies, Group Health, Seattle, WA 98101, USA. [email protected] OBJECTIVE: Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) is an herb commonly used to treatmenopausal symptoms. Little is known about its effect on other physiologicparameters that could result in untoward events. This study examines the effectof black cohosh on lipids, fibrinogen, glucose and insulin.METHODS: Three hundred and fifty-one, 45-55 years old, peri or post-menopausalwomen experiencing vasomotor symptoms participated in a 3-month, double blindtrial with randomization to: (1) black cohosh (160 mg daily); (2) multibotanical including black cohosh (200 mg daily); (3) multibotanical plus soy dietcounseling; (4) conjugated equine estrogen .625 mg, with or withoutmedroxyprogesterone acetate 2.5mg daily, for women with or without a uterus,respectively; (5) placebo. Baseline and month 3 total cholesterol, high densitylipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol(calculated), triglyceride, insulin, glucose, and fibrinogen serum concentrationswere measured in 310 women. Baseline information was also collected on medicalhistory, demographic characteristics, and diet.RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in the adjusted meanchange from baseline to 3 months between the herbal groups and placebo in totalcholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. Adjusted fibrinogenlevels appear to increase in the multibotanical treatment group in comparisonwith the other herbal groups and placebo overall (P = .02), but there was nostatistically s Continue reading >>

Insulin And Black Cohosh Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Insulin And Black Cohosh Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Insulin and Black cohosh drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported only by a few people who take Insulin and Black cohosh together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Insulin and Black cohosh. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 1 person who the same drugs from FDA, and is updated regularly. 1 person who takes Insulin, Black cohosh are studied. Most common drug interactions by gender *: * Approximation only. Some reports may have incomplete information. Connect with people like you, or share your experience to help people like you Print a copy of the study and bring it to your health teams to ensure drug risks and benefits are fully discussed and understood. Want to find out more about the FDA reports used in the study? You can request them from FDA. Insulin has active ingredients of insulin pork. It is often used in diabetes. ( latest outcomes from Insulin 22,780 users ) Black cohosh has active ingredients of black cohosh. It is often used in menopause. ( latest outcomes from Black cohosh 745 users ) Interactions between Insulin and drugs from A to Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Interactions between Black cohosh and drugs from A to Z a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Browse all drug interactions of Insulin and Black cohosh a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Related publications that referenced our studies Continue reading >>

Black Cohosh - Scientific Review On Usage, Dosage, Side Effects | Examine.com

Black Cohosh - Scientific Review On Usage, Dosage, Side Effects | Examine.com

Black Cohosh is the most popular supplement for menopause in North America, but the human studies are mixed. Pretty down the middle, and placebo effect seems to play a great deal in these studies. It holds some benefit for controlling hot flashes and night sweats, but does not appear very potent. Primary Information, Benefits, Effects, and Important Facts Black Cohosh is a herb native to North America that has traditionally been used for cognitive and inflammatory conditions, but has grown in popularity due to it's ability to treat vasomotor symptoms of menopause; primarily hot flashes and night sweats. It is one of the most popular and highest sold supplements in the Western world (10th place in 2008), according to some surveys. Studies on the matter are highly mixed. The larger body of evidence favors the efficacy of Black Cohosh for treatment of vasomotor symptoms but consists largely of unblinded studies; as the placebo effect can reduce menopausal complaints, blinding is needed. Efficacy has been demonstrated with blinded studies on Black Cohosh as well, but many of them are confounded with consumption of other compounds. A few blinded studies on Black Cohosh without any other compounds have been conducted, and are basically split right down the middle on efficacy if not favoring 'no significant effects' a little bit more due to quality of data and sample size. Beyond the questionable efficacy, Black Cohosh appears to be safe. It is non-estrogenic (despite being thought to influence estrogen in the past) and may act centrally (in the brain) via serotonin, dopamine or opioids. Stomach upset has been reported and seems to be attributable to Black Cohosh in some people, but reports of liver toxicity do not appear to be related to the Black Cohosh herb. These reports Continue reading >>

Reducing Insulin Resistance - Miscarriage Research

Reducing Insulin Resistance - Miscarriage Research

Resistance training improved glucose disposal rate by 48% Previously sedentary nonobese patients were enrolled in a resistance training group or used as sedentary control subjects. The training program consisted of two sets of nine exercises with 10-20 repetitions. Subjects trained five times a week for 4-6 weeks. The glucose disposal rate increased 48% in the resistance training group (6.85 to 10.12 mg.kg-1 lean body mass.min-1), but remained unchanged in the sedentary group (5.95 to 6.36 mg.kg-1 lean body mass.min-1). There was no significant change in body composition in either group. In the resistance training group, a 16% increase in quadriceps strength (191.1 to 216.9 Nm) but no significant change (27.6 to 28.6 ml.kg-1.min-1) in VO2max was observed. Resistance training improves insulin sensitivity more than weight loss does HbA1c(a measure of insulin resistance) fell significantly more in the resistance training & weight loss group than weight loss plus a control program group at 3 months (0.6 vs. 0.07%) and 6 months (1.2 vs. 0.4%) (HbA(1c) is measured in percentage, >6.5% is considered diabetic). Similar reductions in body weight and fat mass were observed after 6 months. Resistance training reduces fasting insulin Significant reductions in fasting insulin were observed in the resistance training group. Resistance training improves insulin sensitivity In the 13 randomized controlled trials included in our analysis, resistance training reduced glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) (a measurement of blood sugar control - lower is better) by 0.48% (HbA(1c) is measured in percentage, >6.5% is considered diabetic), fat mass by 2.33 kg and systolic blood pressure by 6.19 mmHg. There was no statistically significant effect of resistance training on total cholesterol, high

Black Cohosh: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Black Cohosh: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Actaea macrotys, Actaea racemosa, Acte Grappes, Acte Grappes Noires, Acte Noire, Aristolochiaceae Noire, Baie dacte, Black Cohosh, Baneberry, Black Aristolochiaceae, Black Snakeroot, Bugbane, Bugwort, Cimicaire Grappes, Cimicifuga, Cimicifuga Racemosa, Cimicifuge, Cohosh Negro, Cohosh Noir, Cytise, Herbe aux Punaises, Macrotys, Phytoestrogen, Phytoestrogne, Racine de Serpent, Racine de Squaw, Racine Noire de Serpents, Rattle Root, Rattle Top, Rattlesnake Root, Rattleweed, Rhizoma Cimicifugae, Sheng Ma, Snakeroot, Squaw Root. Black cohosh is an herb. The root of this herb is used for medicinal purposes. Black cohosh was first used for medicinal purposes by Native American Indians, who introduced it to European colonists. Black cohosh became a popular treatment for womens health issues in Europe in the mid-1950s. Since that time, black cohosh has commonly been used to treat symptoms of menopause , premenstrual syndrome ( PMS ), painful menstruation , acne , weakened bones ( osteoporosis ), and for starting labor in pregnant women. Black cohosh has also been tried for a lot of additional uses, such as anxiety , rheumatism, fever, sore throat , and cough , but it is not often used for these purposes these days. Some people also apply black cohosh directly on the skin . This is because there was some thought that black cohosh would improve the skins appearance. Similarly, people used black cohosh for other skin conditions such as acne , wart removal, and even the removal of moles, but this is seldom done anymore. Black cohosh also goes by the name bugbane because it was once used as an insect repellent. It is no longer used for this purpose. Frontiersmen had said that black cohosh was useful for rattlesnake bites, but no modern researchers have tested this. Do not confuse b Continue reading >>

Health News U Can Use Tips For Menopause And Low Blood Sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003

Health News U Can Use Tips For Menopause And Low Blood Sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003

Back to Back Issues Page Health News U Can Use Tips for menopause and low blood sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003 In This Issue... Easy Menopause Tips: Start now, regardless of your age! Hypoglycemia, Low Blood Sugar Medicinary News: Estrofactors and Black Cohosh instead of Hormone Replacement Therapy? Recipe: Tofu Even a Truck Driver Would Eat Menopause Tips Many women are menopausal or peri-menopausal. A list of common symptoms can be found on the Key to Health Clinic web page. The most common symptoms are hot flashes, night sweats, mood changes, and menstrual changes. Tips on Entering Smoothly into Menopause Exercise regularly. It keeps the metabolism going and is often helpful with depression, anxiety, stress and weight gain. Weight bearing exercise will help to maintain a healthy bone calcium content and help to prevent osteoporosis. Eat a healthy diet rich in vegetables, fruits, and essential fatty acids. Cold water fish are great sources of essential fatty acids: salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines, tuna, and herring. Essential fatty acids help to support the nervous system which may be important for memory and brain function. They are also anti-inflammatory and are very important for skin health. Include soy in your diet. It often helps with hot flashes and estrogen regulation in your body. Nuts and seeds can also be added to the diet for a source of fiber, protein, and essential fatty acids. For example, flax seeds are an important source of healthy anti-inflammatory fats and can help regulate estrogen levels. Avoid unnecessary sources of sugar, alcohol, and caffeine. Avoid smoking as it has been linked to more severe hot flashes and night sweats. Remember that balance in the body is what helps to create health. Make sure to nurture your mind to keep it quick Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance | Natural Fertility Info.com

Insulin Resistance | Natural Fertility Info.com

Disclaimer: Testimonials appearing on this site are individual experiences, reflecting real life experiences of those who have used our products and/or services in some way or other. However, they are individual results and results do vary. We do not claim that they are typical results that consumers will generally achieve. The testimonials are not necessarily representative of all of those who will use our products and/or services. I have been wanting to reach out to you guys for a while, but life has been busy. My husband and I tried to conceive for three long years. I had stage four endometriosis, PCOS, insulin resistance, hypothyroidism, and homozygous MTHFR. He had abnormal sperm only 1% normal. After two surgeries in one year, a round of Lupron, inability to ovulate, giving Clomid a try which only resulted in a huge hemorrhagic, and lots of prayers we were ready to give up. After learning the condition of my husbands sperm in January 2015, my ob said we had less than 1% chance of conceiving and she could no longer help me. We prepared to meet with a specialist and knew we would need IVF or most likely ICSI due to the severity of the situation. We were emotionally drained and ultimately decided to delay meeting with the specialist. We took a cruise a few weeks later and tried to relax. We had discussed starting an organic diet previously and decided to make it happen in May 2015. Within a month we both noticed a difference in how we felt and started looking into natural ways to deal with various issues. I never stopped praying for a baby and one night felt led to do a Google search for conceiving naturally with PCOS, endometriosis, abnormal sperm. I found your website and read pages and pages of success stories with tears running down my face. I went to Whole Food Continue reading >>

Menopause

Menopause

What to Expect, How to Cope For most women, menopause—the cessation of menstrual periods—is a normal, natural occurrence. The average age at menopause is 51, although any time after 40 is considered normal. The years leading up to the menopausal transition—a time known as the perimenopause—may be characterized by changes in the menstrual period, hot flashes (a sudden feeling of warmth, sometimes accompanied by sweating), emotional ups and downs, sleep disturbances, and vaginal dryness. Some of these symptoms may continue after menopause. The severity of symptoms varies dramatically from person to person, ranging from barely noticeable menstrual changes to an experience described as debilitating. Women who experience menopause abruptly because of the surgical removal of their ovaries (called surgical menopause) typically have much more severe symptoms than women who experience a natural menopause. Both the perimenopausal and postmenopausal periods may present additional challenges for women who have diabetes. For one thing, the hormonal fluctuations that are common to perimenopause can affect blood glucose levels. For another, some symptoms of menopause are the same as or easily confused with the symptoms of high or low blood glucose levels, so the cause must be determined before corrective action can be taken. In addition, both diabetes and menopause raise a woman’s risk of osteoporosis, so women with diabetes must be proactive about taking steps to keep their bones strong. Lack of sleep, whether related to menopause, stress, or something else, can disrupt diabetes control. And menopause is often associated with weight gain, which can make blood glucose control more difficult. The menopausal process A woman is said to be postmenopausal one year after her final Continue reading >>

Relieve Menopause Symptoms & More With Black Cohosh

Relieve Menopause Symptoms & More With Black Cohosh

Current: Relieve Menopause Symptoms & More with Black Cohosh Relieve Menopause Symptoms & More with Black Cohosh Dr. Axe on Facebook273 Dr. Axe on Twitter2 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest793 Share on Email Print Article Rebekah EdwardsOctober 26, 2015June 23, 2017 Withresearch revealing the dangers of HRT ( Hormone Replacement Therapy ) in treating hormonal issues, health-conscious women are looking elsewhere for safer, natural treatments for hormonal problems like menopause symptoms . One surprising treatment is black cohosh, a herbal remedy that studies indicate relieve symptoms of menopause (especially hot flashes) among other significant health benefits.( 1 ) I encourage women to understand the transitional period of life known as menopause as well as you can, which will allow you to embrace the changes it brings. When prepared with knowledge about what menopause really is, you can make informed, educated decisions on the best avenues of treatment that dont put your health further at risk (as many hormone-based drugs may do). In fact, this can be one of the best times of your life! Recent studies have shown links between black cohosh and relief of multiple other hormonal problems, not just menopause. One such systematic review (a long-term study of multiple research trials) is being conducted as of August 2015 to review the effects of this herbal supplement as an intervention in breast and prostate cancer patients, male and female, managing hot flashes after endocrine therapy and chemotherapy. ( 2 ) Part of the family Ranunculaceae, black cohosh, or Actaea racemosa (also known as Cimicifuga racemosa) is also called by several nicknames, including black bugbane, black snakeroot and fairy candle. This flowering plant Continue reading >>

Does Black Cohosh Interact With Insulin Resistance? Complete Overview | Treato

Does Black Cohosh Interact With Insulin Resistance? Complete Overview | Treato

Black Cohosh and Hot Flashes Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Black Cohosh and Agnus castus Insulin Resistance and PCOS Black Cohosh and Night Sweats Insulin Resistance and Metformin Black Cohosh and Menopause Insulin Resistance and Weight Loss Black Cohosh and HRT Insulin Resistance and Weight Gain Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

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