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Bitter Melon Tea Diabetes

How To Ripe And Prepare Bitter Melon For Diabetes

How To Ripe And Prepare Bitter Melon For Diabetes

How to cook a simple bitter melon recipe? What benefits can diabetics take from its use? Does it really help in lowering blood sugar levels? Some Simple Facts of Bitter Melon Benefits for Diabetes Start Download - View PDF Ad Convert From Doc to PDF, PDF to Doc Simply With The Free Online App! FromDocToPDF Learn more Before going through the great benefits of bitter melon for diabetes, I would recommend to make it part of your daily dishes. I know that its flavor is very bitter, especially for the ripe fruit, but you can try various types of cooking it. Drinking bitter melon juice in an empty stomach has shown to have better benefits. Or what you can do is to boil its fruits or leaves and have tea. Or maybe you can try its seeds dry powder to the dishes you have. I will pass to you a simple recipe of cooking bitter melon as following: Step no. 1: Take your favorite bitter melon fruit. They come to various types: small, bigger, slimmy, fatty, etc. I have seen that in South-East Asia, they prefer mostly small and near-slimmy bitter gourd fruits like the one shown on the right. Step no.2: Cut them, and remove the internal seeds. I have tried them, they are really bitter. At the end, "Buon appetite!". I have tasted, and looks really bitter. I admit I do not eat it randomly, but when in my staying in South-East Asia, I have tasted several times, especially steamed, and sparkled with lemon juice and mixed with white salad:)) Some Simple Facts of Bitter Melon Benefits for Diabetes Now, as it is very important to get knowledge, let's learn some of the benefits that diabetics can get from using bitter melon. Here I’m trying to tell you what can bitter melon do to help you beat diabetes through realistic scientific researches as for other natural cures for diabetes. Another nam Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions And Warnings - Webmd

Bitter Melon: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions And Warnings - Webmd

View clinical references for this vitamin or supplement Aguwa, C. N. and Mittal, G. C. Abortifacient effects of the roots of Momordica angustisepala. J Ethnopharmacol. 1983;7(2):169-173. View abstract. Akhtar, M. S. Trial of Momordica charantia Linn (Karela) powder in patients with maturity-onset diabetes. J Pak.Med Assoc 1982;32(4):106-107. View abstract. Baldwa VS, Bhandara CM, Pangaria A, and et al. Clinical trials in patients with diabetes mellitus of an insulin-like compound obtained from plant source. Upsala J Med Sci 1977;82:39-41. Chan, W. Y., Tam, P. P., and Yeung, H. W. The termination of early pregnancy in the mouse by beta-momorcharin. Contraception 1984;29(1):91-100. View abstract. Dixit, V. P., Khanna, P., and Bhargava, S. K. Effects of Momordica charantia L. fruit extract on the testicular function of dog. Planta Med 1978;34(3):280-286. View abstract. Dutta PK, Chakravarty AK, CHowdhury US, and Pakrashi SC. Vicine, a favism-inducing toxin from Momordica charantia Linn. seeds. Indian J Chem 1981;20B(August):669-671. Kohno, H., Yasui, Y., Suzuki, R., Hosokawa, M., Miyashita, K., and Tanaka, T. Dietary seed oil rich in conjugated linolenic acid from bitter melon inhibits azoxymethane-induced rat colon carcinogenesis through elevation of colonic PPARgamma expression and alteration of lipid composition. Int J Cancer 7-20-2004;110(6):896-901. View abstract. Lee-Huang, S., Huang, P. L., Sun, Y., Chen, H. C., Kung, H. F., Huang, P. L., and Murphy, W. J. Inhibition of MDA-MB-231 human breast tumor xenografts and HER2 expression by anti-tumor agents GAP31 and MAP30. Anticancer Res 2000;20(2A):653-659. View abstract. Liu, H. L., Wan, X., Huang, X. F., and Kong, L. Y. Biotransformation of sinapic acid catalyzed by Momordica charantia peroxidase. J Agric Food Chem 2- Continue reading >>

The Benefit Of Drinking Bitter Gourd Tea

The Benefit Of Drinking Bitter Gourd Tea

The bitter gourd plant, or Momordica charantia, is a tropical perennial that produces a fruit resembling a cucumber with a warty skin. Also called bitter melon or bitter cucumber, you can brew tea from the fruit, leaves and stems of the plant or use bitter gourd extract to make a tea. Bitter gourd tea has several potential health benefits, although you should discuss its use with your doctor to determine if it might help you. The fruit and leaves of the bitter gourd plant contain several vitamins, including vitamins A and C and the B-complex vitamins -- water-soluble vitamins that are leached from the plant when you brew bitter gourd tea. Bitter gourd also contains a number of natural compounds with biological activity, including alkaloids, glycosides and triterpenoids. It also provides linoleic acid, an essential, omega-6 fatty acid and oleic acid, a healthy, unsaturated dietary fat. Compounds called vicine, charatin and polypeptide-P that affect how your body manages carbohydrate nutrients are also found in bitter gourd. Blood Sugar and Diabetes According to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, bitter melon increases uptake of blood glucose by your liver, fatty tissues and muscles, stimulating these tissues to convert glucose into glycogen, its storage form. These changes tend to lower levels of blood glucose. This helps lessen the demand on your pancreas for insulin, the hormone that lowers blood sugar, and may improve your glucose tolerance. Overall, compounds in bitter gourd improve glucose management and might lower your risk of developing diabetes or help regulate your blood glucose if you already have the disorder. Cancer Some of the compounds in bitter melon might also suppress growth of certain types of cancer cells. In a 2016 study published in "Published Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Bitter Melon Tea?

What Are The Benefits Of Bitter Melon Tea?

What Are the Benefits of Bitter Melon Tea? Bitter melon may control blood sugar levels. What Are the Health Benefits of West Indian Lemongrass Tea? Bitter melon, the fruit of a vine in the cucumber family, has the impressive appearance of a warty cucumber. Bitter melon is grown and eaten as a vegetable throughout Asia and it also prepared and consumed as a tea. Bitter melon has traditionally been used for a variety of purported medicinal benefits, some of which have been proven scientifically. Herbalists and natural medicine practitioners often recommend bitter melon to help control blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes, according to New York University Langone Medical Center. Typical doses range from 50 to 100 mililiters of fresh juice divided into two to three doses throughout the day. A study on laboratory animals published in the September 2005 issue of the journal "Plant Foods For Human Nutrition" found that bitter melon lowered blood sugar levels by up to 30 percent and improved kidney function. However, bitter melon may enhance the effects of diabetes medication and cause hypoglycemia, which is a condition in which a person has a dangerously low blood sugar level. Consult your doctor about using bitter melon to manage blood sugar levels. Bitter melon tea may offer protective benefits against some forms of cancer, according to a study published in the September 2012 issue of the journal "Natural Product Communications". In the tissue culture study, water-extract of bitter melon killed human kidney cancer and colon cancer cells. In an animal study that appeared in the November 2012 issue of the journal "Cancer Letters", bitter melon extract induced early cell death in liver cancer. Researchers concluded that bitter melon shows promise as a safe, natural preventive for li Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon Health Benefits: Can Bitter Melon Help Treat Diabetes?

Bitter Melon Health Benefits: Can Bitter Melon Help Treat Diabetes?

In tropical areas from China, Asia, and Africa to the Caribbean and South America, bitter melon is both a food and a medicine. Unripe, its fruit resembles a warty, green cucumber that gradually turns orange with bright red edible seeds as it matures. Despite an exceedingly bitter taste, the fruits and sometimes the leaves are widely used in a variety of ethnic dishes. Bitter melon is a major constituent of the Okinawan diet and, some say, is key to the renowned longevity of the Japanese island people. Modern research has largely focused on its potential for treating diabetes. How Bitter Melon Works Although the human evidence is not yet strong, laboratory studies show that bitter melon has a hypoglycemic (blood glucose-lowering) action, and helps to control insulin levels. The constituents thought to be responsible for this action are charantin, plus alkaloids and peptides that mimic insulin. They may also trigger the production of a protein that encourages glucose uptake in the body. In addition, charantin appears to stimulate the growth of pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys beta cells; in other types of diabetes the functioning of beta cells is impaired. Laboratory studies support other traditional uses of bitter melon, suggesting that different constituents have antiviral and antibacterial properties that might help to treat disorders including salmonella and E. coli infections, herpes and HIV viruses, malaria, and parasitic worms. An extract of bitter melon proteins is claimed to inhibit prostate tumor growth and a number of in vitro studies suggest it may have potential for combating other cancers and leukemia. How to Use Bitter Melon Traditionally bitter melon is taken as a fresh juice, decoction, or tinctu Continue reading >>

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Bitter melon is also known as karela, bitter gourd, balsam apple, African cucumber and ampalaya. Botanically, this plant is known as Momordica charantia – it is a member of the gourd family, along with its cousins, pumpkin, acorn squash and zucchini. The plant itself is a tropical vine and looks a bit like a very warty cucumber! Bitter melon has been used in a number of traditional medicines as a treatment for diabetes. Analysis of bitter melon indicates that it is very high in antioxidants, a protein that seems to be active against tumor cells, [1] enzymes and fatty acids. It also contains charantin, which appears to be responsible for its effects on blood sugar, vicine and a substance which appears to mimic insulin—polypeptide p. What is the Evidence that Bitter Melon Can Benefit Diabetes? There are two main lines of evidence that bitter melon could potentially be useful in treating diabetes. These two lines of evidence are that bitter melon can lower blood sugar levels and lower blood triglyceride levels. These studies indicated that this can happen in cells, animal studies and in some human studies. At this point, the evidence is limited, but very promising because bitter melon appears to be safe in clinical studies and because of the long-term history of bitter melon as a food—and as a traditional medicine for diabetes. There is one major safety exception, however—any individual with a condition known as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. In these individuals, the vicine can, in theory, cause a form of anemia, headaches, fever, stomach pain and possibly coma. A recent paper compared the effect of bitter melon and metformin in newly diagnosed T2D patients and found that bitter melon (at either 500, 1000 or 2000 mg per day) was effective at Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon: The Medicinal Fruit For Diabetes, Cancer & More

Bitter Melon: The Medicinal Fruit For Diabetes, Cancer & More

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) is a type of edible, medicinal fruit that is native to Asia, Africa and parts of the Caribbean. It has a very long history of use in China, Ayurvedic medicine — a traditional system of healing that has been practiced for India for over 3,000 years — and also in some of the healthiest places of the world, such as Okinawa, Japan (one of the world’s “blue zones“). (1) Records show that culinary and medicinal uses of bitter melon originated in India, then were introduced into Traditional Chinese Medicine practices around the 14th century. Knowing that bitter foods tend to be cleansing for the body and capable of boosting liver health, the Chinese were attracted to bitter melon’s extremely sour taste. They began cooking and using the fruit in recipes, as well as juicing it to create a tonic in order to help treat such conditions as indigestion, an upset stomach, skin wounds, chronic coughs and respiratory infections. Bitter melon has been the focus of well over 100 clinical and observational studies. It’s best known for its hypoglycemic affects (the ability to lower blood sugar), and research shows that the melon’s juice, fruit and dried powder can all be used to mimic insulin’s effects and treat diabetes. (2) Although researchers state that further studies are required to recommend its use for certain conditions, according to a 2004 review published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, findings show that bitter melon has some of the following benefits: (3) Managing blood sugar levels and diabetes Reducing respiratory infections such as pneumonia Lowering inflammation and raising immunity Treating abdominal pain, peptic ulcers, constipation, cramps and fluid retention Increasing cancer-protection Reducing fevers and coughs Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon Tea Side Effects

Bitter Melon Tea Side Effects

Bitter melon acts to decrease blood glucose levels.Photo Credit: midori4/iStock/Getty Images Kathryn Meininger began writing and publishing poetry in 1967. She was co-founder and editor of the professional magazine "Footsteps" and began writing articles online in 2010. She earned a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine from Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine and a Bachelor of Arts in biology from William Paterson University. The fruit of the bitter melon plant resembles a small, bumpy cucumber and is used as a food and, along with its seeds and leaves, as an herbal remedy. The plant, which is also known as bitter gourd, cerasee and balsam pear, is native to tropical parts of Asia, Africa and South America. Bitter melon can be eaten fresh or taken in a tea made from a tincture or juice. Bitter melon is best known for its ability to lower blood sugar, but never self-treat diabetes with bitter melon or any other herb. Take bitter melon only under the direct supervision of your physician as there are some side effects. Bitter melon is effective in lowering blood glucose levels.Photo Credit: Wavebreakmedia Ltd/Wavebreak Media/Getty Images Bitter melon is effective in lowering blood glucose levels, but this can be a double-edged sword. Taking too much bitter melon, taking it with other glucose-lowering medications or taking it when your blood sugar is already low can produce the opposite effect of decreasing your blood sugar too much. AltMD states bitter melon can interact with diabetes medications, including insulin, chlorpropamine, phenformin and glyburide, causing severe hypoglycemia, or dangerously low blood sugar levels. If not treated immediately, severe hypoglycemia can lead to coma and death. Take bitter melon only as directed by your health care provider. Bitter Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon And Diabetes

Bitter Melon And Diabetes

Tweet Bitter melon, also known as bitter gourd or karela (in India), is a unique vegetable-fruit that can be used as food or medicine. It is the edible part of the plant Momordica Charantia, which is a vine of the Cucurbitaceae family and is considered the most bitter among all fruits and vegetables. The plant thrives in tropical and subtropical regions, including: South America Asia parts of Africa the Caribbean The bitter melon itself grows off the vine as a green, oblong-shaped fruit with a distinct warty exterior - though its size, texture and bitterness vary between the different regions in which it grows - and is rich in vital vitamins and minerals. How does it affect diabetes? In addition to being a food ingredient, bitter melon has also long been used as a herbal remedy for a range of ailments, including type 2 diabetes. The fruit contains at least three active substances with anti-diabetic properties, including charantin, which has been confirmed to have a blood glucose-lowering effect, vicine and an insulin-like compound known as polypeptide-p. These substances either work individually or together to help reduce blood sugar levels. It is also known that bitter melon contains a lectin that reduces blood glucose concentrations by acting on peripheral tissues and suppressing appetite - similar to the effects of insulin in the brain. This lectin is thought to be a major factor behind the hypoglycemic effect that develops after eating bitter melon. Scientific evidence A number of clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of bitter melon in the treatment of diabetes. In January 2011, the results of a four-week clinical trial were published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, which showed that a 2,000 mg daily dose of bitter melon significantly r Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon, Diabetes

Bitter Melon, Diabetes

I spent the last three weeks writing about low-carb eating. But at least one fruit, called bitter melon, seems to be a powerful treatment for diabetes, even if you do eat a lot of carbs. In reply to my column on reversing Type 2 diabetes, Debbie commented, My husband was diagnosed with Type 2 four months ago… he had a blood glucose reading of 370. [The] doctor put him on metformin — 1,000 mg a day, which brought his blood glucose down to the low 200’s. So the doctor upped his meds to 2,000 mg a day. Then someone told her about bitter melon tea, and she bought some at a local Asian grocery. He started drinking one cup of tea in the morning and one in the evening. The very next day, his fasting glucose dropped to around 80. He stopped his metformin and his fasting glucose levels have been under 100 ever since. His A1C dropped from 13.5 to 6.3. Since he has only been on the tea for a few weeks, his A1C will probably drop further at the next test. This is a man who is heavy, eats lots of pasta and rice, and whose exercise is “walking the dog twice a week.” Nothing else in his lifestyle has changed. Debbie is sure it’s the bitter melon tea that’s controlling the blood glucose. But one person’s experience is not enough. It’s “anecdotal evidence.” Is there any scientific backup for his story? Not much, but some. A study by researchers in Australia, China, and Germany found that four compounds in bitter melon that “activate an enzyme that is responsible for… transporting glucose from the blood into the cells.” The enzyme is called AMPK, the same one activated by exercise. According to the article, published in March 2008 in the journal Chemistry & Biology, AMPK moves glucose transporter molecules to the surface of cells. There they help bring glucose Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Effects Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Melon) And Its Medicinal Potency

Antidiabetic Effects Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Melon) And Its Medicinal Potency

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus is considered as one of the five leading causes of death in the world[1]. Diabetes mellitus is a major global health concerning with a projected rise in prevalence from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030[2]. It is a syndrome of disordered metabolism, usually due to a combination of hereditary and environmental causes, resulting in abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia)[3]. Being a major degenerative disease, diabetes is found in all parts of the world and it is becoming the third most lethal disease of mankind and increasing rapidly[4]. It is the most common endocrine disorder, affecting 16 million individuals in the United States and as many as 200 million individuals worldwide. Diabetes has been a clinical model for general medicine[5]. Complementary and alternative medicine involves the use of herbs and other dietary supplements as alternatives to mainstream western medical treatment. A recent study has estimated that up to 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus use complementary and alternative medicine[6]. Medicinal plants and its products continue to be an important therapeutic aid for alleviating the ailments of human kind[7]–[9]. Herbs for diabetes treatment are not new. Since ancient times, plants and plant extracts were used to combat diabetes. Many traditional medicines in use are derived from medicinal plants, minerals and organic matter. The World Health Organization (WHO) has listed 21 000 plants, which are used for medicinal purposes around the world. Among them, 150 species are used commercially on a fairly large scale[1],[10]. Momordica charantia (M. charantia), also known as bitter melon, karela, balsam pear, or bitter gourd, is a popular plant used for the treating of diabetes-related cond Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon (gourd) Tea

Bitter Melon (gourd) Tea

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been drinking Bitter Melon (or Gourd) Tea for about a month and the results are great. I am also on the LCHF diet. I am VERY strict about my carb intake; preferably less than 20 grams per day, and I also eat lots of meat. Through diet alone, my readings are about 6.2 to 6.9 mmol two hours after a meal. However, the tea basically takes a full mmol off my reading (e,g from 6.4 to 5.4). I drink a cup of the tea after a meal. It does not take long to start helping my readings, maybe half a day. Once it kicks in, my readings go down to the 5.2 to 5.9 range two hours after a meal. The tea is cheap, about $AUD3.00 for a box of 20. The taste is not unpleasant, maybe a bit oily. Certainly drinkable, but you would not serve it for afternoon tea! It's nowhere near as good at this as Metformin, a drug whose side effects are known and not too bad. There's not been a lot of research on Bitter Melon and it's not certain it works because the research has been of a poor quality. It would be really hard to know if it was the LCHF diet or the tea that was lowering your BG for a single individual because there are so many other factors that can change it. Thanks for your cynicism, but I am confident of my comments. I maintain a strict diet and keep a limited menu of foods. I also keep meticulous records of my BGL tests. My original comment is based on many months on a LCHF diet and 1 month with the same diet and bitter melon tea. My results are based on a day-by-day, meal-by-meal and food-by-food basis. At $AUD3.00 a box and not involving any drugs, it is definitely worth trying. Thanks for your cynicism, but I am confident of my comments. I maintain a strict diet Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon Tea- Benefits, How To Make, & Side Effects

Bitter Melon Tea- Benefits, How To Make, & Side Effects

Some of the most notable benefits of bitter melon tea include its ability to fight against cancer, prevent chronic disease, lower cholesterol levels, regulate diabetes, stimulate the immune system and help the metabolism, among others. There are a number of side effects to drinking this tea that must be considered, including dangerously low blood sugar, liver complications, severe allergic reactions, decreased fertility, headaches, vomiting and nausea. Most of these side effects can be avoided if you drink the tea in moderation, and speak to your doctor about any potential interactions the tea could cause before drinking it. Bitter Melon Tea Benefits What is Bitter Melon Tea? Bitter melon tea is also known as bitter gourd tea in many parts of the world, but they are the same thing. Scientifically known as Momordica charantia, the bitter gourd plant produces gourds that resembled fat, bumpy cucumbers. They also change color to a yellow-orange when they are ready to be harvested. The tea, unlike many other herbal remedies, is produced by steeping multiple parts of the plant, including the seeds, fruit and leaves. The impressive list of health benefits of bitter melon tea is mainly due to the high concentration of vitamin A, vitamin C and B-family vitamins, potassium, magnesium and zinc, as well as the phenolic compounds. Bitter Melon Tea Benefits Drinking bitter melon tea is great for people suffering from diabetes, a slow metabolism, high cholesterol levels, a weak immune system, digestive issues, or a high risk of cancer. With high levels of ascorbic acid, bitter melon tea can be very helpful for stimulating the immune system. Vitamin C can increase the production of white blood cells, and also acts as an antioxidant within the body, suppressing oxidative stress by neut Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Bitter Melon And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Diabetes is a condition that affects blood sugar levels and can lead to health issues if not properly managed. Could eating bitter melon be healthful for those looking to manage diabetes? The bodies of people with diabetes do not produce enough insulin or are not able to use insulin effectively, which leads to there being too much glucose in the blood. Insulin is required so that cells can use it for energy. A healthful diet and exercise are important for people with diabetes to help them manage their condition. Certain foods can cause blood sugar levels to spike, which is problematic. In this article, we explore whether bitter melon is healthful for people looking to manage diabetes. As part of this, we analyze the impact bitter melon may have on blood sugar. Contents of this article: Treating diabetes In type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar is the result of the body not producing enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes, however, occurs when the body does not respond correctly to insulin. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and people of any age can develop it. Many people with diabetes manage their condition well and do not experience further health problems. A range of medications and lifestyle changes can help people with diabetes live healthy lives. However, drug therapies may have some side effects. As such, some people look to try natural treatments that are free of side effects. To make an informed decision about these, it helps to understand the science behind these options. One such natural treatment method is better melon. Although further research is needed to draw reliable conclusions, some research suggests bitter melon may normalize blood glucose levels. What is bitter melon? Bitter melon has many different names, depending on where you are in the w Continue reading >>

Aloe And Bitter Melon Could Help Treat Diabetes

Aloe And Bitter Melon Could Help Treat Diabetes

Studies showed aloe vera extract may lower blood glucose in patients with diabetes and pre-diabetes due to multiple anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiproliferative and antioxidant compounds Compounds in bitter melon, such as vicine, polypeptide-P and charantin, help improve how your body absorbs and metabolizes sugar Bitter melon tea and aloe juice may help alleviate symptoms of diabetes and other metabolic conditions By Dr. Mercola What do aloe and bitter melon have in common? Yes, they're both plants, but both have also been identified as having powerful medicinal effects. New studies show both aloe and bitter melon exert positive effects on diabetes and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). High blood sugar occurs either when you don't produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or your cells don't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes, which represents 90 percent of patients). This is an advanced stage of insulin resistance, and since your insulin is inadequate, sugar can't get into your cells and instead builds up in your blood, causing a variety of problems. This is why diabetics have elevated blood sugar levels. Symptoms include frequent urination, constant thirst and persistent hunger. Diabetes is so prevalent it's been called a global epidemic, and in most people, the condition is not under control. There are multiple therapies, drugs and treatments, but the side effects can be devastating. Nevertheless, annual drug costs for diabetes in the U.S. are around $245 billion, even though type 2 diabetes is typically preventable and even reversible by leading a healthy lifestyle. According to an article in 24/7 Wall St.: "Diabetes directly caused 75,578 deaths in 2013, the sixth highest death toll from a single disease in the United States. Further, diabetes is likely f Continue reading >>

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