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Bitter Melon Pills For Diabetes

Bitter Gourd (karela) Juice For Diabetes – How To Prepare, Benefits, And Dosage

Bitter Gourd (karela) Juice For Diabetes – How To Prepare, Benefits, And Dosage

Bitter gourd or bitter melon (karela) juice is the best natural medicine for diabetes. Drinking it early in the morning on an empty stomach helps lower your blood sugar levels and reduces the possibility of diabetes-related health complications like weight gain, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, etc. But the problem with bitter gourd juice is that many people find it unpalatable due to its bitter taste. And this is where our article comes into play. Our amazing bitter gourd juice recipe will help you down it without thinking twice. Read on to find out how to prepare bitter gourd juice, dosage, etc. Let’s begin! Highlights Of The Article Bitter gourd is also known as bitter melon, African cucumber, balsam apple, karela, and ampalaya. Its color ranges from white to fresh green. It is 3-12 inches tall, has crocodile-like skin, and is a vine-grown bitter-tasting vegetable that belongs to the cucumber family. The riper it is, the more bitter it is. But this bitter vegetable is a traditional medicine for treating diabetes. Find out what diabetes is and why it affects so many people in the next section. Diabetes is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world (1). It is a chronic disease that occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells become insulin resistant. Insulin is a hormone that helps in glucose uptake by the cells. High blood sugar levels for a prolonged duration leads to diabetes and other related diseases. Diabetic genes are passed on from generation to generation, but the condition can also occur due to a sedentary lifestyle and improper food habits. It can be classified into type I and type II. Type I diabetes is caused when the body produces inadequate amount or no insulin at all and is also known as juvenile diabete Continue reading >>

Aloe And Bitter Melon Could Help Treat Diabetes

Aloe And Bitter Melon Could Help Treat Diabetes

Studies showed aloe vera extract may lower blood glucose in patients with diabetes and pre-diabetes due to multiple anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiproliferative and antioxidant compounds Compounds in bitter melon, such as vicine, polypeptide-P and charantin, help improve how your body absorbs and metabolizes sugar Bitter melon tea and aloe juice may help alleviate symptoms of diabetes and other metabolic conditions By Dr. Mercola What do aloe and bitter melon have in common? Yes, they're both plants, but both have also been identified as having powerful medicinal effects. New studies show both aloe and bitter melon exert positive effects on diabetes and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). High blood sugar occurs either when you don't produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or your cells don't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes, which represents 90 percent of patients). This is an advanced stage of insulin resistance, and since your insulin is inadequate, sugar can't get into your cells and instead builds up in your blood, causing a variety of problems. This is why diabetics have elevated blood sugar levels. Symptoms include frequent urination, constant thirst and persistent hunger. Diabetes is so prevalent it's been called a global epidemic, and in most people, the condition is not under control. There are multiple therapies, drugs and treatments, but the side effects can be devastating. Nevertheless, annual drug costs for diabetes in the U.S. are around $245 billion, even though type 2 diabetes is typically preventable and even reversible by leading a healthy lifestyle. According to an article in 24/7 Wall St.: "Diabetes directly caused 75,578 deaths in 2013, the sixth highest death toll from a single disease in the United States. Further, diabetes is likely f Continue reading >>

How To Use Bitter Melon To Lower Blood Sugar

How To Use Bitter Melon To Lower Blood Sugar

Bitter melon, also called bitter apple, bitter gourd or bitter cucumber, is a vine-grown vegetable that can range in color from dark green to white and can grow between three to twelve inches tall. Diabetes Health reports that several compounds in bitter melon may have glucose-lowering properties and they include polypeptide P, vicine, and momordin and charantin, which are glycosides. The juice and pulp can be eaten and an injectable compound made from this vegetable has also been tested. There's no traditional dose established for bitter melon. You should always consult your doctor before using bitter melon as a supplement to help control diabetes. Video of the Day The easiest way to consume bitter melon is by adding it to a stir-fry. Add several slices to your favorite vegetables and cook quickly over high heat. The taste of bitter melon is very bitter, so you may consider also adding sweeter vegetables such as onions, baby corn or green bell pepper. Buy bitter melon supplements, which are available in capsule form from Asian grocery stores, health food or natural food stores. Look for 500mg capsules, which should be taken twice a day with meals or as directed on the package. Monitor your glucose levels closely. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center reports that bitter melon has a significant hypoglycemic effect, but that further studies are needed to verify this. Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon Effectiveness, Safety, And Drug Interactions On Rxlist

Bitter Melon Effectiveness, Safety, And Drug Interactions On Rxlist

What other names is Bitter Melon known by? African Cucumber, Ampalaya, Balsam Pear, Balsam-Apple, Balsambirne, Balsamo, Bitter Apple, Bitter Cucumber, Bitter Gourd, Bittergurke, Carilla Fruit, Carilla Gourd, Cerasee, Chinli-Chih, Cundeamor, Fructus Mormordicae Grosvenori, Karavella, Kathilla, Karela, Kareli, Kerala, Kuguazi, K'u-Kua, Lai Margose, Meln Amargo, Melon Amer, Momordica, Momordica charantia, Momordica murcata, Momordique, Pepino Montero, P'u-T'ao, Sorosi, Sushavi, Vegetable insulin, Wild Cucumber. Bitter melon is a plant. The fruit and seeds are used to make medicine. Bitter melon is used for various stomach and intestinal disorders including gastrointestinal (GI) upset, ulcers, colitis, constipation, and intestinal worms. It is also used for diabetes, kidney stones, fever, a skin condition called psoriasis, and liver disease; to start menstruation; and as supportive treatment for people with HIV/AIDS. Topically, bitter melon is used for deep skin infections (abscesses) and wounds. Bitter melon is used as a vegetable in India and other Asian countries and as an ingredient in some kinds of curries. Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for... Diabetes. Research results so far are conflicting and inconclusive. Some studies show that bitter melon fruit, fruit juice, or extract improves glucose tolerance, reduces blood sugar levels, and lowers HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over time) in people with type 2 diabetes . However, these studies have some flaws. Other research has not been positive. Bitter melon contains a chemical that acts like insulin to help reduce blood sugar levels. Bitter melon fruit is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in the short-term. The safety of long-term use (beyond 3 months) is not known. There also is no Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon Health Benefits: Can Bitter Melon Help Treat Diabetes?

Bitter Melon Health Benefits: Can Bitter Melon Help Treat Diabetes?

In tropical areas from China, Asia, and Africa to the Caribbean and South America, bitter melon is both a food and a medicine. Unripe, its fruit resembles a warty, green cucumber that gradually turns orange with bright red edible seeds as it matures. Despite an exceedingly bitter taste, the fruits and sometimes the leaves are widely used in a variety of ethnic dishes. Bitter melon is a major constituent of the Okinawan diet and, some say, is key to the renowned longevity of the Japanese island people. Modern research has largely focused on its potential for treating diabetes. How Bitter Melon Works Although the human evidence is not yet strong, laboratory studies show that bitter melon has a hypoglycemic (blood glucose-lowering) action, and helps to control insulin levels. The constituents thought to be responsible for this action are charantin, plus alkaloids and peptides that mimic insulin. They may also trigger the production of a protein that encourages glucose uptake in the body. In addition, charantin appears to stimulate the growth of pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys beta cells; in other types of diabetes the functioning of beta cells is impaired. Laboratory studies support other traditional uses of bitter melon, suggesting that different constituents have antiviral and antibacterial properties that might help to treat disorders including salmonella and E. coli infections, herpes and HIV viruses, malaria, and parasitic worms. An extract of bitter melon proteins is claimed to inhibit prostate tumor growth and a number of in vitro studies suggest it may have potential for combating other cancers and leukemia. How to Use Bitter Melon Traditionally bitter melon is taken as a fresh juice, decoction, or tinctu Continue reading >>

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Bitter melon is also known as karela, bitter gourd, balsam apple, African cucumber and ampalaya. Botanically, this plant is known as Momordica charantia – it is a member of the gourd family, along with its cousins, pumpkin, acorn squash and zucchini. The plant itself is a tropical vine and looks a bit like a very warty cucumber! Bitter melon has been used in a number of traditional medicines as a treatment for diabetes. Analysis of bitter melon indicates that it is very high in antioxidants, a protein that seems to be active against tumor cells, [1] enzymes and fatty acids. It also contains charantin, which appears to be responsible for its effects on blood sugar, vicine and a substance which appears to mimic insulin—polypeptide p. What is the Evidence that Bitter Melon Can Benefit Diabetes? There are two main lines of evidence that bitter melon could potentially be useful in treating diabetes. These two lines of evidence are that bitter melon can lower blood sugar levels and lower blood triglyceride levels. These studies indicated that this can happen in cells, animal studies and in some human studies. At this point, the evidence is limited, but very promising because bitter melon appears to be safe in clinical studies and because of the long-term history of bitter melon as a food—and as a traditional medicine for diabetes. There is one major safety exception, however—any individual with a condition known as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. In these individuals, the vicine can, in theory, cause a form of anemia, headaches, fever, stomach pain and possibly coma. A recent paper compared the effect of bitter melon and metformin in newly diagnosed T2D patients and found that bitter melon (at either 500, 1000 or 2000 mg per day) was effective at Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon For Lowering Blood Sugar In Type 2's

Bitter Melon For Lowering Blood Sugar In Type 2's

Bitter Melon for Lowering Blood Sugar in Type 2's I was diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes 5 months ago. My A1C was at 365. My doctor prescribed Metformin. I did not like the ups and down of Metformin, and while looking on line I found out about Bitter Mellon. I started taking it 2 weeks after I was diagnosed, and I stopped the Metformin. I take a 250 mg capsule, with each meal, and one before going to bed. My A1C was down to 137, 2 weeks ago. I use a Product from Himalaya Herbal Healthcare, called Karela (250 mg). I buy it on E-Bay. I have tried other brands, but this one seems to work the best. I use this, with a "mostly" low carb diet, and keep my blood sugar level low. I still have my Friday night pizza, but I take an extra capsule. Bitter melon or cinnamon for lowering sugar? I bought my dad bitter melon caps and he tried them for about a month and really didn't see any significant positive results. I also bought my dad glucocil and after a few weeks he basically told me it was garbage. I looked into diabetes support pack and liked the ingredients in it, but there was no way my father was going to take all those pills every day. I did more research and found the cinnamon had been helping alot of diabetics and found a supplement called cinnalife which was created by an actual pharmacist which has a big dose of cinnamon. I really liked all the other ingredients that it had and it was only 3 pills per day. My dad has been on it now for about a month and he absolutely loves it. He's doing a lot more things around the house and is a lot more active overall. His sugar levels have also improved especially after eating. Has anyone else tried cinnalife? If so I would love to know if it worked for you also, thanks. I bought my dad bitter melon caps and he tried them for about a Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon Diabetes News

Bitter Melon Diabetes News

The case for bitter melon in diabetes keeps looking better and better. New information and new products have come out, though there are still no large studies on humans. To review: Bitter melon is a fruit and a vegetable, nobody can decide which. It grows in most tropical countries in Asia, Africa, Australia, South America, and the Caribbean. It goes by the names bitter melon, bitter gourd, bitter squash, karela, and goya, among many others. The scientific name is Momordica charantia. It seems to lower blood sugar well. Look at the comments to my 2013 article on bitter melon or read customer reviews for any bitter melon product such as teas or capsules. You will find overwhelming agreement that Momordica works. The main complaints are about taste, and some people get digestive upset, as can happen with metformin. There seems to be a risk of going too low if you take bitter melon along with certain diabetes medicines such as insulin or a sulfonylurea. There may also be a risk of going low using bitter melon along with metformin. You’ll have to proceed carefully and speak to your health-care provider if you’re on these or other medicines, as bitter melon can interact with a variety of drugs, but a number of readers commented that they lowered their doses or stopped meds completely with their doctor’s approval. How bitter melon works is not known, but at least three active ingredients have been isolated in the lab. An article in The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal in 2011 listed multiple chemicals from bitter melon that could lower sugar. The authors believed the strongest chemical was charantin, which appears to act similarly to insulin. It gets glucose into the cells like insulin does and keeps excess glucose in the liver like insulin and metformin do. It may be t Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon And Diabetes

Bitter Melon And Diabetes

Tweet Bitter melon, also known as bitter gourd or karela (in India), is a unique vegetable-fruit that can be used as food or medicine. It is the edible part of the plant Momordica Charantia, which is a vine of the Cucurbitaceae family and is considered the most bitter among all fruits and vegetables. The plant thrives in tropical and subtropical regions, including: South America Asia parts of Africa the Caribbean The bitter melon itself grows off the vine as a green, oblong-shaped fruit with a distinct warty exterior - though its size, texture and bitterness vary between the different regions in which it grows - and is rich in vital vitamins and minerals. How does it affect diabetes? In addition to being a food ingredient, bitter melon has also long been used as a herbal remedy for a range of ailments, including type 2 diabetes. The fruit contains at least three active substances with anti-diabetic properties, including charantin, which has been confirmed to have a blood glucose-lowering effect, vicine and an insulin-like compound known as polypeptide-p. These substances either work individually or together to help reduce blood sugar levels. It is also known that bitter melon contains a lectin that reduces blood glucose concentrations by acting on peripheral tissues and suppressing appetite - similar to the effects of insulin in the brain. This lectin is thought to be a major factor behind the hypoglycemic effect that develops after eating bitter melon. Scientific evidence A number of clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of bitter melon in the treatment of diabetes. In January 2011, the results of a four-week clinical trial were published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, which showed that a 2,000 mg daily dose of bitter melon significantly r Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Bitter Melon And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Diabetes is a condition that affects blood sugar levels and can lead to health issues if not properly managed. Could eating bitter melon be healthful for those looking to manage diabetes? The bodies of people with diabetes do not produce enough insulin or are not able to use insulin effectively, which leads to there being too much glucose in the blood. Insulin is required so that cells can use it for energy. A healthful diet and exercise are important for people with diabetes to help them manage their condition. Certain foods can cause blood sugar levels to spike, which is problematic. In this article, we explore whether bitter melon is healthful for people looking to manage diabetes. As part of this, we analyze the impact bitter melon may have on blood sugar. Contents of this article: Treating diabetes In type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar is the result of the body not producing enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes, however, occurs when the body does not respond correctly to insulin. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and people of any age can develop it. Many people with diabetes manage their condition well and do not experience further health problems. A range of medications and lifestyle changes can help people with diabetes live healthy lives. However, drug therapies may have some side effects. As such, some people look to try natural treatments that are free of side effects. To make an informed decision about these, it helps to understand the science behind these options. One such natural treatment method is better melon. Although further research is needed to draw reliable conclusions, some research suggests bitter melon may normalize blood glucose levels. What is bitter melon? Bitter melon has many different names, depending on where you are in the w Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Bitter Melon: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

African Cucumber, Ampalaya, Balsam Pear, Balsam-Apple, Balsambirne, Balsamine, Balsamo, Bitter Apple, Bitter Cucumber, Bitter Gourd, Bittergurke, Carilla Fruit, Carilla Gourd, Cerasee, Chinli-Chih, Concombre Africain, Courge Amre, Cundeamor, Fructus Mormordicae Grosvenori, Karavella, Karela, Kareli, Kathilla, Kerala, Korolla, Kuguazi, K'u-Kua, Lai Margose, Margose, Meln Amargo, Melon Amer, Momordica, Momordica charantia, Momordica murcata, Momordique, Paroka, Pepino Montero, Poire Balsamique, Pomme de Merveille, P'u-T'ao, Sorosi, Sushavi, Ucche, Vegetable insulin, Wild Cucumber. Bitter melon is a vegetable used in India and other Asian countries. The fruit and seeds are used to make medicine. People use bitter melon for diabetes, stomach and intestinal problems, to promote menstruation, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses. Diabetes. Research results so far are conflicting and inconclusive. Some research shows that taking bitter melon can reduce blood sugar levels and lower HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over time) in people with type 2 diabetes. But these studies have some flaws, and conflicting results exist. Higher quality studies are needed. Bitter melon is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term (up to 3 months). Bitter melon may cause an upset stomach in some people. The safety of long-term use of bitter melon is not known. There also is not enough information about the safety of applying bitter melon directly to the skin. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Bitter melon is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy. Certain chemicals in bitter melon might start menstrual bleeding and have caused abortion in animals. Not enough is known about the safety of using bitter melon du Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon

Bitter Melon

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) is alsoknown as bitter gourd, bitter cucumber,bitter apple, karolla and karela. Bitter melon is a member of theCucurbitaceae family and is related tohoneydew and Persian melon, cantaloupe,muskmelon and casaba. Bitter melon is avegetable cultivated and eaten in manyparts of the world, including India, Asia,Africa and South America. Bitter melon grows on a vine with greenleaves and yellow flowers. The fruit has abumpy exterior, resembling a cucumber,and the interior is yellow-orange. There aremany varieties of bitter melon, ranging incolor from creamy white, golden, pale greento very dark green. Green melons are theones most often seen in the United States.Some varieties are only a few inches longwith very pronounced bumps; others aremuch larger with smoother, less-definedbumps. The fruit and seeds of bitter melon arethought to be useful for diabetes. Some Ingredients May LowerBlood Glucose Bitter melon contains several chemicalingredients, including the glycosidesmomordin and charantin. PolypeptideP, charantin and vicine are the specificcomponents thought to have bloodglucose-lowering effects. Other possible mechanisms in diabetesinclude increased tissue glucose uptake,liver and muscle glycogen synthesis,inhibition of enzymes involved in glucoseproduction and enhanced glucoseoxidation. Cautions About Bitter Melon Bitter melon should be used with caution byyoung women of childbearing age since itmay induce menstruation and inadvertentlycause abortion if the woman is pregnant. There is no information about its use inlactating women, so it should be avoided. Children should not use bitter melonbecause serious adverse effects haveoccurred, including hypoglycemic coma. There is no traditional dose of bitter melonsince different forms are in Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Effects Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Melon) And Its Medicinal Potency

Antidiabetic Effects Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Melon) And Its Medicinal Potency

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus is considered as one of the five leading causes of death in the world[1]. Diabetes mellitus is a major global health concerning with a projected rise in prevalence from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030[2]. It is a syndrome of disordered metabolism, usually due to a combination of hereditary and environmental causes, resulting in abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia)[3]. Being a major degenerative disease, diabetes is found in all parts of the world and it is becoming the third most lethal disease of mankind and increasing rapidly[4]. It is the most common endocrine disorder, affecting 16 million individuals in the United States and as many as 200 million individuals worldwide. Diabetes has been a clinical model for general medicine[5]. Complementary and alternative medicine involves the use of herbs and other dietary supplements as alternatives to mainstream western medical treatment. A recent study has estimated that up to 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus use complementary and alternative medicine[6]. Medicinal plants and its products continue to be an important therapeutic aid for alleviating the ailments of human kind[7]–[9]. Herbs for diabetes treatment are not new. Since ancient times, plants and plant extracts were used to combat diabetes. Many traditional medicines in use are derived from medicinal plants, minerals and organic matter. The World Health Organization (WHO) has listed 21 000 plants, which are used for medicinal purposes around the world. Among them, 150 species are used commercially on a fairly large scale[1],[10]. Momordica charantia (M. charantia), also known as bitter melon, karela, balsam pear, or bitter gourd, is a popular plant used for the treating of diabetes-related cond Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon: The Medicinal Fruit For Diabetes, Cancer & More

Bitter Melon: The Medicinal Fruit For Diabetes, Cancer & More

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) is a type of edible, medicinal fruit that is native to Asia, Africa and parts of the Caribbean. It has a very long history of use in China, Ayurvedic medicine — a traditional system of healing that has been practiced for India for over 3,000 years — and also in some of the healthiest places of the world, such as Okinawa, Japan (one of the world’s “blue zones“). (1) Records show that culinary and medicinal uses of bitter melon originated in India, then were introduced into Traditional Chinese Medicine practices around the 14th century. Knowing that bitter foods tend to be cleansing for the body and capable of boosting liver health, the Chinese were attracted to bitter melon’s extremely sour taste. They began cooking and using the fruit in recipes, as well as juicing it to create a tonic in order to help treat such conditions as indigestion, an upset stomach, skin wounds, chronic coughs and respiratory infections. Bitter melon has been the focus of well over 100 clinical and observational studies. It’s best known for its hypoglycemic affects (the ability to lower blood sugar), and research shows that the melon’s juice, fruit and dried powder can all be used to mimic insulin’s effects and treat diabetes. (2) Although researchers state that further studies are required to recommend its use for certain conditions, according to a 2004 review published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, findings show that bitter melon has some of the following benefits: (3) Managing blood sugar levels and diabetes Reducing respiratory infections such as pneumonia Lowering inflammation and raising immunity Treating abdominal pain, peptic ulcers, constipation, cramps and fluid retention Increasing cancer-protection Reducing fevers and coughs Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon For Diabetes: It Helps Beat Blood Sugar, A1c, Cholesterol & Weight!

Bitter Melon For Diabetes: It Helps Beat Blood Sugar, A1c, Cholesterol & Weight!

Although bitter melon may be new to you, it's been used as a diabetes treatment for high glucose levels for centuries in places like India, China, parts of Africa and South America. Bitter melon is part of the cucurbitaceae family, a vine that bears a variety of different shaped fruits that are commonly used in cooking stirs fries and soups, and as an herbal tea. The young leaves can also be eaten fresh as greens. JUMP TO: What is bitter melon | How does bitter melon work | Bitter melon for blood sugar & A1c | Bitter melon for insulin resistance | Bitter melon for cardiovascular disease | Bitter melon for weight | Benefits & conclusion DISCLAIMER Please note that this information is not an endorsement for bitter melon. We are simply sharing the research surrounding it. You should always discuss supplementation with your doctor. What is bitter melon? Bitter melon is a plant native to the tropical regions of Asia, South America, and the Caribbean. It also goes by several other names like “bitter squash,” “bitter gourd,” or “bitter apple,” as well as its scientific name, “momordica charantia.” Judging by its many descriptive labels, you can probably guess how it tastes… bitter! Still, while it may be one of the more sour fruits out there, you'll soon discover that its health benefits are pretty darn sweet. How does bitter melon work? Armed with 32 active phytochemicals, bitter melon is a disease-fighting machine. It has many anti-viral, anti-bacterial and hypoglycemic properties. But the main selling point of bitter melon is its ability to improve chronic metabolic diseases. Alongside its powerful phytochemicals, bitter melon contains vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory agents. And combined, these properties have the potential to stabi Continue reading >>

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