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Bitter Melon Diabetes Type 1

Aloe And Bitter Melon Could Help Treat Diabetes

Aloe And Bitter Melon Could Help Treat Diabetes

Studies showed aloe vera extract may lower blood glucose in patients with diabetes and pre-diabetes due to multiple anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiproliferative and antioxidant compounds Compounds in bitter melon, such as vicine, polypeptide-P and charantin, help improve how your body absorbs and metabolizes sugar Bitter melon tea and aloe juice may help alleviate symptoms of diabetes and other metabolic conditions By Dr. Mercola What do aloe and bitter melon have in common? Yes, they're both plants, but both have also been identified as having powerful medicinal effects. New studies show both aloe and bitter melon exert positive effects on diabetes and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). High blood sugar occurs either when you don't produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or your cells don't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes, which represents 90 percent of patients). This is an advanced stage of insulin resistance, and since your insulin is inadequate, sugar can't get into your cells and instead builds up in your blood, causing a variety of problems. This is why diabetics have elevated blood sugar levels. Symptoms include frequent urination, constant thirst and persistent hunger. Diabetes is so prevalent it's been called a global epidemic, and in most people, the condition is not under control. There are multiple therapies, drugs and treatments, but the side effects can be devastating. Nevertheless, annual drug costs for diabetes in the U.S. are around $245 billion, even though type 2 diabetes is typically preventable and even reversible by leading a healthy lifestyle. According to an article in 24/7 Wall St.: "Diabetes directly caused 75,578 deaths in 2013, the sixth highest death toll from a single disease in the United States. Further, diabetes is likely f Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Bitter Melon And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Diabetes is a condition that affects blood sugar levels and can lead to health issues if not properly managed. Could eating bitter melon be healthful for those looking to manage diabetes? The bodies of people with diabetes do not produce enough insulin or are not able to use insulin effectively, which leads to there being too much glucose in the blood. Insulin is required so that cells can use it for energy. A healthful diet and exercise are important for people with diabetes to help them manage their condition. Certain foods can cause blood sugar levels to spike, which is problematic. In this article, we explore whether bitter melon is healthful for people looking to manage diabetes. As part of this, we analyze the impact bitter melon may have on blood sugar. Contents of this article: Treating diabetes In type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar is the result of the body not producing enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes, however, occurs when the body does not respond correctly to insulin. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and people of any age can develop it. Many people with diabetes manage their condition well and do not experience further health problems. A range of medications and lifestyle changes can help people with diabetes live healthy lives. However, drug therapies may have some side effects. As such, some people look to try natural treatments that are free of side effects. To make an informed decision about these, it helps to understand the science behind these options. One such natural treatment method is better melon. Although further research is needed to draw reliable conclusions, some research suggests bitter melon may normalize blood glucose levels. What is bitter melon? Bitter melon has many different names, depending on where you are in the w Continue reading >>

How To Use Bitter Melon To Lower Blood Sugar

How To Use Bitter Melon To Lower Blood Sugar

Bitter melon, also called bitter apple, bitter gourd or bitter cucumber, is a vine-grown vegetable that can range in color from dark green to white and can grow between three to twelve inches tall. Diabetes Health reports that several compounds in bitter melon may have glucose-lowering properties and they include polypeptide P, vicine, and momordin and charantin, which are glycosides. The juice and pulp can be eaten and an injectable compound made from this vegetable has also been tested. There's no traditional dose established for bitter melon. You should always consult your doctor before using bitter melon as a supplement to help control diabetes. Video of the Day The easiest way to consume bitter melon is by adding it to a stir-fry. Add several slices to your favorite vegetables and cook quickly over high heat. The taste of bitter melon is very bitter, so you may consider also adding sweeter vegetables such as onions, baby corn or green bell pepper. Buy bitter melon supplements, which are available in capsule form from Asian grocery stores, health food or natural food stores. Look for 500mg capsules, which should be taken twice a day with meals or as directed on the package. Monitor your glucose levels closely. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center reports that bitter melon has a significant hypoglycemic effect, but that further studies are needed to verify this. Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Bitter Melon (mormordica Charantia) In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

The Effect Of Bitter Melon (mormordica Charantia) In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

The effect of bitter melon (Mormordica charantia) in patients with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis 1College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Pomona, CA, USA *College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences College of Pharmacy, 309 E. Second Street, Pomona, CA 91766, USA. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2014 Jul 27; Revised 2014 Sep 24; Accepted 2014 Oct 10. Copyright 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Mormordica charantia (bitter melon) has been investigated for lowering plasma glucose in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Previous data has offered inconclusive and inconsistent results about the benefits of bitter melon in patients with DM. Our current project aims to determine whether bitter melon has a favorable effect in lowering plasma glucose in patients with DM. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library from inception to July 2013 without any language restrictions for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating bitter melon to no treatment in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Study selection, data extraction and validity of each article were independently assessed by two investigators. Articles were appraised for proper random sequence generation, alloc Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon Diabetes News

Bitter Melon Diabetes News

The case for bitter melon in diabetes keeps looking better and better. New information and new products have come out, though there are still no large studies on humans. To review: Bitter melon is a fruit and a vegetable, nobody can decide which. It grows in most tropical countries in Asia, Africa, Australia, South America, and the Caribbean. It goes by the names bitter melon, bitter gourd, bitter squash, karela, and goya, among many others. The scientific name is Momordica charantia. It seems to lower blood sugar well. Look at the comments to my 2013 article on bitter melon or read customer reviews for any bitter melon product such as teas or capsules. You will find overwhelming agreement that Momordica works. The main complaints are about taste, and some people get digestive upset, as can happen with metformin. There seems to be a risk of going too low if you take bitter melon along with certain diabetes medicines such as insulin or a sulfonylurea. There may also be a risk of going low using bitter melon along with metformin. You’ll have to proceed carefully and speak to your health-care provider if you’re on these or other medicines, as bitter melon can interact with a variety of drugs, but a number of readers commented that they lowered their doses or stopped meds completely with their doctor’s approval. How bitter melon works is not known, but at least three active ingredients have been isolated in the lab. An article in The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal in 2011 listed multiple chemicals from bitter melon that could lower sugar. The authors believed the strongest chemical was charantin, which appears to act similarly to insulin. It gets glucose into the cells like insulin does and keeps excess glucose in the liver like insulin and metformin do. It may be t Continue reading >>

Effect Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Gourd) Tablets In Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1 And Type 2

Effect Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Gourd) Tablets In Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1 And Type 2

Effect of momordica charantia (bitter gourd) tablets in diabetes mellitus: Type 1 and Type 2 Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) or bitter gourd commonly known as karella, (family: Cucurbitaceae), has been proved for hypoglycemic effects. Momordica Charantia is one of the many plants considered to have a hypoglycemic effect and many diabetic subjects consume it because of its hypoglycemic effect. Bitter gourd is well known for its insulin-like protein, called p-insulin, v-insulin, or polypeptide-p, that decreases fasting blood sugar levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Cucurbitantype triterpenoids in fruits, including momordicine and momordicosides, and conjugated linolenic acid, a fatty acid found in high concentrations in the seeds, help reverse insulin resistance. Fiber and saponins in bitter gourd slow down carbohydrate digestion and prevent high post-prandial blood sugar levels. Isolated compounds, bitter gourd extract, juices and powders have demonstrated potential in lowering blood sugar. Different groups of patients were treated by bitter gourd tablet (BGT) for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks treatment biochemical parameters from blood serum were analyzed. The significant differences of glucose, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglyceride, in BGT treated group compare to diabetic group were found. So, from present study it is, concluded that Bitter gourd tablets has beneficial effects on glucose tolerance. Do you want to read the rest of this article? ... The analysis of different groups of patients, who received bitter melon tablets for 12 weeks, has shown an important fall of glucose and cholesterol blood rate. High Density Lipoproteins, Low Density Lipoproteins, triglyceride, in tablets low the blood glucose concentration in treated diabetic patients group compare Continue reading >>

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Bitter melon is also known as karela, bitter gourd, balsam apple, African cucumber and ampalaya. Botanically, this plant is known as Momordica charantia – it is a member of the gourd family, along with its cousins, pumpkin, acorn squash and zucchini. The plant itself is a tropical vine and looks a bit like a very warty cucumber! Bitter melon has been used in a number of traditional medicines as a treatment for diabetes. Analysis of bitter melon indicates that it is very high in antioxidants, a protein that seems to be active against tumor cells, [1] enzymes and fatty acids. It also contains charantin, which appears to be responsible for its effects on blood sugar, vicine and a substance which appears to mimic insulin—polypeptide p. What is the Evidence that Bitter Melon Can Benefit Diabetes? There are two main lines of evidence that bitter melon could potentially be useful in treating diabetes. These two lines of evidence are that bitter melon can lower blood sugar levels and lower blood triglyceride levels. These studies indicated that this can happen in cells, animal studies and in some human studies. At this point, the evidence is limited, but very promising because bitter melon appears to be safe in clinical studies and because of the long-term history of bitter melon as a food—and as a traditional medicine for diabetes. There is one major safety exception, however—any individual with a condition known as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. In these individuals, the vicine can, in theory, cause a form of anemia, headaches, fever, stomach pain and possibly coma. A recent paper compared the effect of bitter melon and metformin in newly diagnosed T2D patients and found that bitter melon (at either 500, 1000 or 2000 mg per day) was effective at Continue reading >>

Dietary Supplements For Diabetes: An Evaluation Of Commonly Used Products

Dietary Supplements For Diabetes: An Evaluation Of Commonly Used Products

In Brief Individuals with diabetes are more likely than those without diabetes to use different modalities that may not be considered part of mainstream allopathic or conventional medicine. Many dietary supplements of botanical and nonbotanical origin are available over the counter to treat diabetes or its comorbidities. Clinicians must maintain a respectful attitude toward patients' health care values and beliefs, encourage open dialogue, and provide accurate, nonjudgmental information about different supplements. It is essential that clinicians stay informed about dietary supplements to evaluate whether side effects or potential interactions among medications, dietary supplements, medical conditions, or nutrients may occur. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) enacted in 1994 established the definition of “dietary supplement” as “a product taken by mouth that contains a ‘dietary ingredient’ intended to supplement the diet.” The dietary ingredients in these products may include minerals, vitamins, herbs or other botanical ingredients, amino acids, and substances such as enzymes, organ tissues, and metabolites.1 DSHEA categorizes dietary supplements under the general umbrella of “foods” rather than drugs and requires that every product be labeled as a dietary supplement.1 These products are available in a variety of dosage forms.1 Patients use many products and modalities to treat diabetes or its comorbidities. People with diabetes are 1.6 times more likely to use a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatment modality than those without diabetes.2 CAM includes acupuncture, reflexology, massage therapy, chiropractic services, and biological complementary therapies, which include dietary supplements.3 Individuals who use dieta Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon

Bitter Melon

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) is alsoknown as bitter gourd, bitter cucumber,bitter apple, karolla and karela. Bitter melon is a member of theCucurbitaceae family and is related tohoneydew and Persian melon, cantaloupe,muskmelon and casaba. Bitter melon is avegetable cultivated and eaten in manyparts of the world, including India, Asia,Africa and South America. Bitter melon grows on a vine with greenleaves and yellow flowers. The fruit has abumpy exterior, resembling a cucumber,and the interior is yellow-orange. There aremany varieties of bitter melon, ranging incolor from creamy white, golden, pale greento very dark green. Green melons are theones most often seen in the United States.Some varieties are only a few inches longwith very pronounced bumps; others aremuch larger with smoother, less-definedbumps. The fruit and seeds of bitter melon arethought to be useful for diabetes. Some Ingredients May LowerBlood Glucose Bitter melon contains several chemicalingredients, including the glycosidesmomordin and charantin. PolypeptideP, charantin and vicine are the specificcomponents thought to have bloodglucose-lowering effects. Other possible mechanisms in diabetesinclude increased tissue glucose uptake,liver and muscle glycogen synthesis,inhibition of enzymes involved in glucoseproduction and enhanced glucoseoxidation. Cautions About Bitter Melon Bitter melon should be used with caution byyoung women of childbearing age since itmay induce menstruation and inadvertentlycause abortion if the woman is pregnant. There is no information about its use inlactating women, so it should be avoided. Children should not use bitter melonbecause serious adverse effects haveoccurred, including hypoglycemic coma. There is no traditional dose of bitter melonsince different forms are in Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Bitter Melon: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

African Cucumber, Ampalaya, Balsam Pear, Balsam-Apple, Balsambirne, Balsamine, Balsamo, Bitter Apple, Bitter Cucumber, Bitter Gourd, Bittergurke, Carilla Fruit, Carilla Gourd, Cerasee, Chinli-Chih, Concombre Africain, Courge Amre, Cundeamor, Fructus Mormordicae Grosvenori, Karavella, Karela, Kareli, Kathilla, Kerala, Korolla, Kuguazi, K'u-Kua, Lai Margose, Margose, Meln Amargo, Melon Amer, Momordica, Momordica charantia, Momordica murcata, Momordique, Paroka, Pepino Montero, Poire Balsamique, Pomme de Merveille, P'u-T'ao, Sorosi, Sushavi, Ucche, Vegetable insulin, Wild Cucumber. Bitter melon is a vegetable used in India and other Asian countries. The fruit and seeds are used to make medicine. People use bitter melon for diabetes, stomach and intestinal problems, to promote menstruation, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses. Diabetes. Research results so far are conflicting and inconclusive. Some research shows that taking bitter melon can reduce blood sugar levels and lower HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar control over time) in people with type 2 diabetes. But these studies have some flaws, and conflicting results exist. Higher quality studies are needed. Bitter melon is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth short-term (up to 3 months). Bitter melon may cause an upset stomach in some people. The safety of long-term use of bitter melon is not known. There also is not enough information about the safety of applying bitter melon directly to the skin. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Bitter melon is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy. Certain chemicals in bitter melon might start menstrual bleeding and have caused abortion in animals. Not enough is known about the safety of using bitter melon du Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes The Sugars

Type 1 Diabetes The Sugars

ride the highs , the secret life of , well rounded wellness Sometimes, having diabetes can feel crazylonely. And since type 1s are so rare,chances are we might not evenknow another person with diabetes. This is certainly the case for me. I think I know like, 6.2 total diabetics from various corners of my life. And as someone who thrives off of big, relatable groups of friends, I gotta be honest, having so few diabetics in my corner feels prettyyyyyy, prettyyyyyy, pretty bleak. Spotting diabetics in the wild is what I imagine going on Safari in the dark, on foot, and without a guide must feel like.Freakin pointless. Diabetes is aninvisible disease. Its not like all of us have one recognizable physical traitlike a nostril thats slightly larger than the other. Or a freckle just above our right shoulder bladethats shaped like the taco emoji. Even the parts of diabetes that are tangible (our pumps, test kits, CGMs, etc.) are typically hidden under our shirts so that strangers wont ask us why we still carry around beepers. Butlast week, when I was crossing the street near my office, I saw a lone little test strip left abandoned in the middle of the street. I immediately thought, HELLO FROM THE OTHER SIIIIIIIIIDE. Whoever you are, I love you!JK, I dont love you. Thats insane. I just wish that I knew you! And even though I never sawtheactual human being responsible for dropping this little guy on the street, I felt a little less alone if even for the teensiest, most fleeting second. Someone hadflashed their anonymous diabetic calling card. I thought about that moment for a while. And aboutwhyI dont know any diabetics andwhy thatfeels so lonely sometimes. Its pretty simple, though. People dont see my diabetes because its hiding! And therefore when I dont talk about it openly, o Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Effects Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Melon) And Its Medicinal Potency

Antidiabetic Effects Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Melon) And Its Medicinal Potency

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus is considered as one of the five leading causes of death in the world[1]. Diabetes mellitus is a major global health concerning with a projected rise in prevalence from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030[2]. It is a syndrome of disordered metabolism, usually due to a combination of hereditary and environmental causes, resulting in abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia)[3]. Being a major degenerative disease, diabetes is found in all parts of the world and it is becoming the third most lethal disease of mankind and increasing rapidly[4]. It is the most common endocrine disorder, affecting 16 million individuals in the United States and as many as 200 million individuals worldwide. Diabetes has been a clinical model for general medicine[5]. Complementary and alternative medicine involves the use of herbs and other dietary supplements as alternatives to mainstream western medical treatment. A recent study has estimated that up to 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus use complementary and alternative medicine[6]. Medicinal plants and its products continue to be an important therapeutic aid for alleviating the ailments of human kind[7]–[9]. Herbs for diabetes treatment are not new. Since ancient times, plants and plant extracts were used to combat diabetes. Many traditional medicines in use are derived from medicinal plants, minerals and organic matter. The World Health Organization (WHO) has listed 21 000 plants, which are used for medicinal purposes around the world. Among them, 150 species are used commercially on a fairly large scale[1],[10]. Momordica charantia (M. charantia), also known as bitter melon, karela, balsam pear, or bitter gourd, is a popular plant used for the treating of diabetes-related cond Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon, Ivy Gourd

Bitter Melon, Ivy Gourd

My young kid became, all of a sudden, diabetic type 1. I ve been reading a lot of news and information about nutrition, exercise and alternative ways to reduce the amount of insulin intake.For example I read interesting things about bitter melon, ivy gourd and fenugreek in DiabetesHealth. The problem is that our traditional doctor knows nothing about these kind of alternative therapies. Does anyone knows or ever tried those vegetables extracts? I am the mom of a type one insulin dependent diabetic.I can tell you that there is no real way to reduce insulin in take.A you one diabetic does not produce any insulin so insulin must be gotten for the body from an out side source. Shots or pump.To try to reduce the insulin intake could be dangerous as the brain needs energy that the insulin provides.A young growing child needs insulin and you will find as you child grows his / her insulin requirements will change. Our daughters can be stable for a while then change weekly. I would check with your Childs endocrinologist before changing anything in the insulin intake.If you cut back the insulin our could cause DKA which can be very serious and if not treated properly and quickly can cause death. I wish I could say that there is a cure and I know something that works but for now insulin is the life support of our children Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon And Diabetes

Bitter Melon And Diabetes

Tweet Bitter melon, also known as bitter gourd or karela (in India), is a unique vegetable-fruit that can be used as food or medicine. It is the edible part of the plant Momordica Charantia, which is a vine of the Cucurbitaceae family and is considered the most bitter among all fruits and vegetables. The plant thrives in tropical and subtropical regions, including: South America Asia parts of Africa the Caribbean The bitter melon itself grows off the vine as a green, oblong-shaped fruit with a distinct warty exterior - though its size, texture and bitterness vary between the different regions in which it grows - and is rich in vital vitamins and minerals. How does it affect diabetes? In addition to being a food ingredient, bitter melon has also long been used as a herbal remedy for a range of ailments, including type 2 diabetes. The fruit contains at least three active substances with anti-diabetic properties, including charantin, which has been confirmed to have a blood glucose-lowering effect, vicine and an insulin-like compound known as polypeptide-p. These substances either work individually or together to help reduce blood sugar levels. It is also known that bitter melon contains a lectin that reduces blood glucose concentrations by acting on peripheral tissues and suppressing appetite - similar to the effects of insulin in the brain. This lectin is thought to be a major factor behind the hypoglycemic effect that develops after eating bitter melon. Scientific evidence A number of clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of bitter melon in the treatment of diabetes. In January 2011, the results of a four-week clinical trial were published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, which showed that a 2,000 mg daily dose of bitter melon significantly r Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? Try Bitter Melon (momordica Charantia)

Have Diabetes? Try Bitter Melon (momordica Charantia)

Praana Integrative Medicine & Holistic Health Center, PLLC Have Diabetes? Try Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia) A cousin of watermelon, cucumber and pumpkin, Bitter Melon is shaped like a cucumber, only larger with lighter green and more gourd-like skin. In tropical cultures, where its cultivated, bitter melon is used to support digestion because of its ability to break down carbohydrates. When using for medicinal purposes, the entire plant can be used, dried or fresh, from leaves and stems to the actual juice. Holistic physicians and researchers are interested in Bitter Melon for its effect on blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes mellitus. Chemicals in the extract act similar to insulin. A number of studies have found that bitter melon juice, fruit and dried powder have a moderate effect on lowering blood glucose. In other studies, a plant insulin injection given to patients with Type-1 diabetes showed a decrease in blood glucose. The decrease was not as significant for patients with Type-2 diabetes, but there was a decline in blood glucose levels compared to a control group. It seems that source and type of preparatio n, as well as individual patient factors, may play a role in the effect of bitter melon on diabetes, which will inspire further research. In India, bitter melon is used to make different vegetable preparations. Juicing is another way to utilize its beneficial properties but since it is very bitter, I like to use some raw honey, beets, carrots and green apple with it. You can also blend bitter melon into various foods and enjoy it several times a week when it is in season. Although considered relatively safe, consult your holistic practitioner to determine the appropriate type and amount to use for your particular needs. If you are pregnant or Continue reading >>

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