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Bitter Gourd Diabetes

Bitter Melon Diabetes News

Bitter Melon Diabetes News

The case for bitter melon in diabetes keeps looking better and better. New information and new products have come out, though there are still no large studies on humans. To review: Bitter melon is a fruit and a vegetable, nobody can decide which. It grows in most tropical countries in Asia, Africa, Australia, South America, and the Caribbean. It goes by the names bitter melon, bitter gourd, bitter squash, karela, and goya, among many others. The scientific name is Momordica charantia. It seems to lower blood sugar well. Look at the comments to my 2013 article on bitter melon or read customer reviews for any bitter melon product such as teas or capsules. You will find overwhelming agreement that Momordica works. The main complaints are about taste, and some people get digestive upset, as can happen with metformin. There seems to be a risk of going too low if you take bitter melon along with certain diabetes medicines such as insulin or a sulfonylurea. There may also be a risk of going low using bitter melon along with metformin. You’ll have to proceed carefully and speak to your health-care provider if you’re on these or other medicines, as bitter melon can interact with a variety of drugs, but a number of readers commented that they lowered their doses or stopped meds completely with their doctor’s approval. How bitter melon works is not known, but at least three active ingredients have been isolated in the lab. An article in The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal in 2011 listed multiple chemicals from bitter melon that could lower sugar. The authors believed the strongest chemical was charantin, which appears to act similarly to insulin. It gets glucose into the cells like insulin does and keeps excess glucose in the liver like insulin and metformin do. It may be t Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Effects Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Melon) And Its Medicinal Potency

Antidiabetic Effects Of Momordica Charantia (bitter Melon) And Its Medicinal Potency

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes mellitus is considered as one of the five leading causes of death in the world[1]. Diabetes mellitus is a major global health concerning with a projected rise in prevalence from 171 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030[2]. It is a syndrome of disordered metabolism, usually due to a combination of hereditary and environmental causes, resulting in abnormally high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia)[3]. Being a major degenerative disease, diabetes is found in all parts of the world and it is becoming the third most lethal disease of mankind and increasing rapidly[4]. It is the most common endocrine disorder, affecting 16 million individuals in the United States and as many as 200 million individuals worldwide. Diabetes has been a clinical model for general medicine[5]. Complementary and alternative medicine involves the use of herbs and other dietary supplements as alternatives to mainstream western medical treatment. A recent study has estimated that up to 30% of patients with diabetes mellitus use complementary and alternative medicine[6]. Medicinal plants and its products continue to be an important therapeutic aid for alleviating the ailments of human kind[7]–[9]. Herbs for diabetes treatment are not new. Since ancient times, plants and plant extracts were used to combat diabetes. Many traditional medicines in use are derived from medicinal plants, minerals and organic matter. The World Health Organization (WHO) has listed 21 000 plants, which are used for medicinal purposes around the world. Among them, 150 species are used commercially on a fairly large scale[1],[10]. Momordica charantia (M. charantia), also known as bitter melon, karela, balsam pear, or bitter gourd, is a popular plant used for the treating of diabetes-related cond Continue reading >>

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Surprising Benefits Of Bitter Melon For Diabetes

Bitter melon is also known as karela, bitter gourd, balsam apple, African cucumber and ampalaya. Botanically, this plant is known as Momordica charantia – it is a member of the gourd family, along with its cousins, pumpkin, acorn squash and zucchini. The plant itself is a tropical vine and looks a bit like a very warty cucumber! Bitter melon has been used in a number of traditional medicines as a treatment for diabetes. Analysis of bitter melon indicates that it is very high in antioxidants, a protein that seems to be active against tumor cells, [1] enzymes and fatty acids. It also contains charantin, which appears to be responsible for its effects on blood sugar, vicine and a substance which appears to mimic insulin—polypeptide p. What is the Evidence that Bitter Melon Can Benefit Diabetes? There are two main lines of evidence that bitter melon could potentially be useful in treating diabetes. These two lines of evidence are that bitter melon can lower blood sugar levels and lower blood triglyceride levels. These studies indicated that this can happen in cells, animal studies and in some human studies. At this point, the evidence is limited, but very promising because bitter melon appears to be safe in clinical studies and because of the long-term history of bitter melon as a food—and as a traditional medicine for diabetes. There is one major safety exception, however—any individual with a condition known as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. In these individuals, the vicine can, in theory, cause a form of anemia, headaches, fever, stomach pain and possibly coma. A recent paper compared the effect of bitter melon and metformin in newly diagnosed T2D patients and found that bitter melon (at either 500, 1000 or 2000 mg per day) was effective at Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon And Diabetes

Bitter Melon And Diabetes

Tweet Bitter melon, also known as bitter gourd or karela (in India), is a unique vegetable-fruit that can be used as food or medicine. It is the edible part of the plant Momordica Charantia, which is a vine of the Cucurbitaceae family and is considered the most bitter among all fruits and vegetables. The plant thrives in tropical and subtropical regions, including: South America Asia parts of Africa the Caribbean The bitter melon itself grows off the vine as a green, oblong-shaped fruit with a distinct warty exterior - though its size, texture and bitterness vary between the different regions in which it grows - and is rich in vital vitamins and minerals. How does it affect diabetes? In addition to being a food ingredient, bitter melon has also long been used as a herbal remedy for a range of ailments, including type 2 diabetes. The fruit contains at least three active substances with anti-diabetic properties, including charantin, which has been confirmed to have a blood glucose-lowering effect, vicine and an insulin-like compound known as polypeptide-p. These substances either work individually or together to help reduce blood sugar levels. It is also known that bitter melon contains a lectin that reduces blood glucose concentrations by acting on peripheral tissues and suppressing appetite - similar to the effects of insulin in the brain. This lectin is thought to be a major factor behind the hypoglycemic effect that develops after eating bitter melon. Scientific evidence A number of clinical studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of bitter melon in the treatment of diabetes. In January 2011, the results of a four-week clinical trial were published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology, which showed that a 2,000 mg daily dose of bitter melon significantly r Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon Health Benefits: Can Bitter Melon Help Treat Diabetes?

Bitter Melon Health Benefits: Can Bitter Melon Help Treat Diabetes?

In tropical areas from China, Asia, and Africa to the Caribbean and South America, bitter melon is both a food and a medicine. Unripe, its fruit resembles a warty, green cucumber that gradually turns orange with bright red edible seeds as it matures. Despite an exceedingly bitter taste, the fruits and sometimes the leaves are widely used in a variety of ethnic dishes. Bitter melon is a major constituent of the Okinawan diet and, some say, is key to the renowned longevity of the Japanese island people. Modern research has largely focused on its potential for treating diabetes. How Bitter Melon Works Although the human evidence is not yet strong, laboratory studies show that bitter melon has a hypoglycemic (blood glucose-lowering) action, and helps to control insulin levels. The constituents thought to be responsible for this action are charantin, plus alkaloids and peptides that mimic insulin. They may also trigger the production of a protein that encourages glucose uptake in the body. In addition, charantin appears to stimulate the growth of pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys beta cells; in other types of diabetes the functioning of beta cells is impaired. Laboratory studies support other traditional uses of bitter melon, suggesting that different constituents have antiviral and antibacterial properties that might help to treat disorders including salmonella and E. coli infections, herpes and HIV viruses, malaria, and parasitic worms. An extract of bitter melon proteins is claimed to inhibit prostate tumor growth and a number of in vitro studies suggest it may have potential for combating other cancers and leukemia. How to Use Bitter Melon Traditionally bitter melon is taken as a fresh juice, decoction, or tinctu Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Bitter Gourd And Bitter Juice

Health Benefits Of Bitter Gourd And Bitter Juice

Health Benefits of Bitter Gourd And Bitter Juice Health Benefits of Bitter Gourd And Bitter Juice Bitter gourd is a popular vegetable in some Asian countries, where the health benefits of the plant are well-knownparticularly, its ability to lower blood glucose in diabetics. 1. Bitter gourd lowers blood glucose as it contains a chemical called Charantin which reduces high blood glucose levels so it is very good for Diabetic persons. Bitter gourd influences glucose metabolism all over the body not like the other medicinal drugs which are effective only in one target organ or tissue. You can take Bitter Gourd juice every morning on an empty stomach to lower down the blood sugar. 2. It purifies blood because of its blood-purifying properties and also cures many blood disorders like blood boils and itching due to blood poisoning. 3. It is high in fiber thus preventing constipation and also cures many stomach disorders by helping in stimulating the secretion of gastric juices. This can be very helpful for people with dyspepsia. Do not take in case of heartburn and ulcers. 4. Those who want to lose weight can add Bitter Gourd in their diet as it stimulates liver for excretion of bile juices that are very essential for metabolism of fats. 5. Suffering from piles then takes fresh juice of bitter gourd. You can also have mixture of bitter melon juice and buttermilk every morning for about a month to get rid from this painful disease. Make a paste of the roots of bitter gourd plant and applied over piles to get a favorable result. 6. Bitter Gourd juice is beneficial in the treatment of a bad hangover. 7. Fresh juice of bitter gourd leaves can be used to treat cholera in early stages. 8. Bitter Gourd juice in the morning can help to strengthen your immune system and increase your Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Bitter Gourd

Health Benefits Of Bitter Gourd

The bitter gourd (also known as bitter melon) looks like a cucumber but with ugly gourd-like bumps all over it. As the name implies, this vegetable is a melon that is bitter. There are two varieties of this vegetable: One grows to about 20 cm long, is oblong and pale green in color. The other is the smaller variety, less than 10 cm long, oval and has a darker green color. Both varieties have seeds that are white when unripe and turn red when they are ripe. The vegetable-fruit turn reddish-orange when ripe and becomes even more bitter. Bitter gourd thrives in hot and humid climates, so are commonly found in Asian countries and South America. Unfamiliar with the bitter, Westerners can find bitter melon difficult to consume. But if you can handle the bitterness, you will be able to enjoy the health benefits of the bitter gourd. Try it, at least for all its healthful virtues! Bitter gourds are very low in calories but dense with precious nutrients. It is an excellent source of vitamins B1, B2, and B3, C, magnesium, folate, zinc, phosphorus, manganese, and has high dietary fiber. It is rich in iron, contains twice the beta-carotene of broccoli, twice the calcium of spinach , and twice the potassium of a banana . Bitter melon contains a unique phyto-constituent that has been confirmed to have a hypoglycemic effect called charantin. There is also another insulin-like compound known as polypeptide P which have been suggested as insulin replacement in some diabetic patients. There are few other fruit or vegetables that can offer the medicinal properties for the following ailments quite like bitter melon does. Bitter gourd treats blood disorders: Bitter gourd juice is highly beneficial for treating blood disorders like blood boils and itching due to toxemia. Mix 2 ounces of fres Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions And Warnings - Webmd

Bitter Melon: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions And Warnings - Webmd

View clinical references for this vitamin or supplement Aguwa, C. N. and Mittal, G. C. Abortifacient effects of the roots of Momordica angustisepala. J Ethnopharmacol. 1983;7(2):169-173. View abstract. Akhtar, M. S. Trial of Momordica charantia Linn (Karela) powder in patients with maturity-onset diabetes. J Pak.Med Assoc 1982;32(4):106-107. View abstract. Baldwa VS, Bhandara CM, Pangaria A, and et al. Clinical trials in patients with diabetes mellitus of an insulin-like compound obtained from plant source. Upsala J Med Sci 1977;82:39-41. Chan, W. Y., Tam, P. P., and Yeung, H. W. The termination of early pregnancy in the mouse by beta-momorcharin. Contraception 1984;29(1):91-100. View abstract. Dixit, V. P., Khanna, P., and Bhargava, S. K. Effects of Momordica charantia L. fruit extract on the testicular function of dog. Planta Med 1978;34(3):280-286. View abstract. Dutta PK, Chakravarty AK, CHowdhury US, and Pakrashi SC. Vicine, a favism-inducing toxin from Momordica charantia Linn. seeds. Indian J Chem 1981;20B(August):669-671. Kohno, H., Yasui, Y., Suzuki, R., Hosokawa, M., Miyashita, K., and Tanaka, T. Dietary seed oil rich in conjugated linolenic acid from bitter melon inhibits azoxymethane-induced rat colon carcinogenesis through elevation of colonic PPARgamma expression and alteration of lipid composition. Int J Cancer 7-20-2004;110(6):896-901. View abstract. Lee-Huang, S., Huang, P. L., Sun, Y., Chen, H. C., Kung, H. F., Huang, P. L., and Murphy, W. J. Inhibition of MDA-MB-231 human breast tumor xenografts and HER2 expression by anti-tumor agents GAP31 and MAP30. Anticancer Res 2000;20(2A):653-659. View abstract. Liu, H. L., Wan, X., Huang, X. F., and Kong, L. Y. Biotransformation of sinapic acid catalyzed by Momordica charantia peroxidase. J Agric Food Chem 2- Continue reading >>

How To Use Bitter Melon To Lower Blood Sugar

How To Use Bitter Melon To Lower Blood Sugar

Bitter melon, also called bitter apple, bitter gourd or bitter cucumber, is a vine-grown vegetable that can range in color from dark green to white and can grow between three to twelve inches tall. Diabetes Health reports that several compounds in bitter melon may have glucose-lowering properties and they include polypeptide P, vicine, and momordin and charantin, which are glycosides. The juice and pulp can be eaten and an injectable compound made from this vegetable has also been tested. There's no traditional dose established for bitter melon. You should always consult your doctor before using bitter melon as a supplement to help control diabetes. Video of the Day The easiest way to consume bitter melon is by adding it to a stir-fry. Add several slices to your favorite vegetables and cook quickly over high heat. The taste of bitter melon is very bitter, so you may consider also adding sweeter vegetables such as onions, baby corn or green bell pepper. Buy bitter melon supplements, which are available in capsule form from Asian grocery stores, health food or natural food stores. Look for 500mg capsules, which should be taken twice a day with meals or as directed on the package. Monitor your glucose levels closely. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center reports that bitter melon has a significant hypoglycemic effect, but that further studies are needed to verify this. Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon

Bitter Melon

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) is alsoknown as bitter gourd, bitter cucumber,bitter apple, karolla and karela. Bitter melon is a member of theCucurbitaceae family and is related tohoneydew and Persian melon, cantaloupe,muskmelon and casaba. Bitter melon is avegetable cultivated and eaten in manyparts of the world, including India, Asia,Africa and South America. Bitter melon grows on a vine with greenleaves and yellow flowers. The fruit has abumpy exterior, resembling a cucumber,and the interior is yellow-orange. There aremany varieties of bitter melon, ranging incolor from creamy white, golden, pale greento very dark green. Green melons are theones most often seen in the United States.Some varieties are only a few inches longwith very pronounced bumps; others aremuch larger with smoother, less-definedbumps. The fruit and seeds of bitter melon arethought to be useful for diabetes. Some Ingredients May LowerBlood Glucose Bitter melon contains several chemicalingredients, including the glycosidesmomordin and charantin. PolypeptideP, charantin and vicine are the specificcomponents thought to have bloodglucose-lowering effects. Other possible mechanisms in diabetesinclude increased tissue glucose uptake,liver and muscle glycogen synthesis,inhibition of enzymes involved in glucoseproduction and enhanced glucoseoxidation. Cautions About Bitter Melon Bitter melon should be used with caution byyoung women of childbearing age since itmay induce menstruation and inadvertentlycause abortion if the woman is pregnant. There is no information about its use inlactating women, so it should be avoided. Children should not use bitter melonbecause serious adverse effects haveoccurred, including hypoglycemic coma. There is no traditional dose of bitter melonsince different forms are in Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon For Diabetes: It Helps Beat Blood Sugar, A1c, Cholesterol & Weight!

Bitter Melon For Diabetes: It Helps Beat Blood Sugar, A1c, Cholesterol & Weight!

Although bitter melon may be new to you, it's been used as a diabetes treatment for high glucose levels for centuries in places like India, China, parts of Africa and South America. Bitter melon is part of the cucurbitaceae family, a vine that bears a variety of different shaped fruits that are commonly used in cooking stirs fries and soups, and as an herbal tea. The young leaves can also be eaten fresh as greens. JUMP TO: What is bitter melon | How does bitter melon work | Bitter melon for blood sugar & A1c | Bitter melon for insulin resistance | Bitter melon for cardiovascular disease | Bitter melon for weight | Benefits & conclusion DISCLAIMER Please note that this information is not an endorsement for bitter melon. We are simply sharing the research surrounding it. You should always discuss supplementation with your doctor. What is bitter melon? Bitter melon is a plant native to the tropical regions of Asia, South America, and the Caribbean. It also goes by several other names like “bitter squash,” “bitter gourd,” or “bitter apple,” as well as its scientific name, “momordica charantia.” Judging by its many descriptive labels, you can probably guess how it tastes… bitter! Still, while it may be one of the more sour fruits out there, you'll soon discover that its health benefits are pretty darn sweet. How does bitter melon work? Armed with 32 active phytochemicals, bitter melon is a disease-fighting machine. It has many anti-viral, anti-bacterial and hypoglycemic properties. But the main selling point of bitter melon is its ability to improve chronic metabolic diseases. Alongside its powerful phytochemicals, bitter melon contains vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory agents. And combined, these properties have the potential to stabi Continue reading >>

How To Prepare Your Own Bitter Melon

How To Prepare Your Own Bitter Melon

Written by Nadia Haris ; Updated November 28, 2017 Bitter melon can be cooked in a variety of ways. Bitter melon is a small, gourd-like melon that is commonly used as a food in Southeast Asia. It is also considered a medicinal food and it is eaten whole and extracted to aid the treatment of diabetes, cholesterol and infections. Bitter melon can be challenging to cook because, as its name suggests, it is has a strong bitter taste. You can prepare this vegetable, which is also known as karela, by lightly frying, boiling, steaming or roasting it. Wash the bitter melons and pat them dry with dish towel. Cut off the short stalks at both ends. Scrape the outer peel of the bitter melon with a paring knife to remove a thin layer of peel. Bitter melon is not typically peeled because the outer skin is edible; however, removing a thin layer of peel helps to reduce the rough outer texture. Cut the bitter melon in half length-wise. Remove the seeds and fibrous core using a teaspoon or a paring knife. The seeds and core are edible and can be cooked along with the bitter melon pieces if desired. Slice the bitter melon halves width-wise into 2-inch thick pieces. Place a frying pan on the stove and turn the heat to medium-high. Pour in a tablespoon of canola or olive oil and allow it to heat up until it is lightly simmering. Drop in the bitter melon pieces and allow them to cook. Stir the bitter melon constantly with a wooden spoon as they cook. Continue lightly frying the bitter melon until they are toasted. Place a paper towel onto a plate. Transfer the toasted bitter melon pieces from the frying pan onto the plate. The paper towel absorbs any excess oil in the bitter melon. Add to salads, stews and soups. Bitter melon can also be prepared by boiling, steaming or by baking in an oven Continue reading >>

Bitter Gourd (karela) Juice For Diabetes – How To Prepare, Benefits, And Dosage

Bitter Gourd (karela) Juice For Diabetes – How To Prepare, Benefits, And Dosage

Bitter gourd or bitter melon (karela) juice is the best natural medicine for diabetes. Drinking it early in the morning on an empty stomach helps lower your blood sugar levels and reduces the possibility of diabetes-related health complications like weight gain, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, etc. But the problem with bitter gourd juice is that many people find it unpalatable due to its bitter taste. And this is where our article comes into play. Our amazing bitter gourd juice recipe will help you down it without thinking twice. Read on to find out how to prepare bitter gourd juice, dosage, etc. Let’s begin! Highlights Of The Article Bitter gourd is also known as bitter melon, African cucumber, balsam apple, karela, and ampalaya. Its color ranges from white to fresh green. It is 3-12 inches tall, has crocodile-like skin, and is a vine-grown bitter-tasting vegetable that belongs to the cucumber family. The riper it is, the more bitter it is. But this bitter vegetable is a traditional medicine for treating diabetes. Find out what diabetes is and why it affects so many people in the next section. Diabetes is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world (1). It is a chronic disease that occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells become insulin resistant. Insulin is a hormone that helps in glucose uptake by the cells. High blood sugar levels for a prolonged duration leads to diabetes and other related diseases. Diabetic genes are passed on from generation to generation, but the condition can also occur due to a sedentary lifestyle and improper food habits. It can be classified into type I and type II. Type I diabetes is caused when the body produces inadequate amount or no insulin at all and is also known as juvenile diabete Continue reading >>

Bitter Melon

Bitter Melon

Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you. This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009. Continue reading >>

Karela Or Bittergourd Can Help Manage Diabetes Better

Karela Or Bittergourd Can Help Manage Diabetes Better

Most of us avoid eating or rather dislike bitter gourd or karela due to its bitter taste, but what we lose by keeping it out of our diet are many nutrients required by body and thereby missing out on its health benefits. It is known to be highly beneficial for diabetics owing to the two very essential compounds called charatin and momordicin, that are the key compounds in lowering one’s blood sugar levels. It is also packed with anti-oxidants that helps the body fight off the associated complications commonly seen in diabetics by scavenging free radicals. More importantly, the seeds of the plant are packed with a plant insulin called polypeptide-P, that mimics the insulin produced by the human pancreas, and reduces one’s sugar levels. You may like to read about home remedies for diabetes. Not only for diabetes, karela is known to have various other benefits like to maintain a healthy digestive health etc. Tip: If you suffer from low blood sugar or hypoglycaemia, do not have karela juice or karela concentrate. It can cause a sudden drop in your blood sugar levels leading to a number of serious complications. Get the best out of karela The best way to have it is to consume as a juice, with its seeds on an empty stomach. Cut the karela with the skin and the seeds, soak in water with salt and haldi or turmeric for 15 minutes. This will help reduce the bitter taste. Now take out the pieces from the water and grind it with the water and a few drops of lemon. Sieve out the fibrous part and drink on an empty stomach, preferably first thing in the morning. Karela juice also has various health benefits and drinking it daily is ideal not only for diabetics but also everyone. For a change of taste and an added boost to your immune system try adding half a piece of amla or India Continue reading >>

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