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Biotin And Metformin Together

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Biotin And Metformin (glucophage) : Dr.bernstein & Diabetes Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

Biotin And Metformin (glucophage) : Dr.bernstein & Diabetes Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

I read SimplyDawn's post on biotin and it read, in part: "Biotin has been found to stimulate glucokinase, an enzyme in the liver, resulting in increased synthesis of glycogen , the storage form of glucose. Biotin has also been found to stimulate the secretion of insulin in the pancreas of rats, " I'm taking metformin, the generic for Glucophage. This supresses the production of glucose by the liver. Also, if biotin stimulates insulin release, it seems to me that it would be counter-productive for ALL of us. Could someone clear this up for me, either from personal experience or a quote from research? from Encyclopedia of Nutritional Supplements by Michael T Murray: Biotin supplementation enhances insulin sensitivity and increases the activity of the enzyme glucokinase. Glucokinase is the enzyme responsible for the first step in the utilization of glucose by the liver. Glucokinase concentrations in diabetics are very low. Evidently, supplementing the diet with high doses of biotin improves glucokinase activity and glucose metabolism in diabetics. In one study, supplementation of 16 milligrams of biotin per day resulted in significant lowering of fasting blood sugar levels and improvements in blood glucose control in type 1 diabetics. In a study of type 2 diabetics, similar effects were noted with 9 milligrams of biotin per day. High-dose biotin is also very helpful in the treatment of severe diabetic nerve disease (diabetic neuropathy). Continue reading >>

Biotin And Metformin?

Biotin And Metformin?

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. i was looking at this thread and saw the suggestions to take biotin. can you take this at the same time as met or will they interact badly with each other? thanks (i'm not sure if this is a good or stupid question) After 13 months, 9 cycles (5 anovulatory), metformin, clomid, hypnosis, and acupuncture: BFP on 12/16/09! Born via C-Section (footling breech) 8/21/09 20.5 in & 8lbs 5.7oz my RE has told me to add 1000mg of biotin to my other meds which include metformin. 2000mg Met, 100mg Spiro, micronor mini pill, Iron Injections, 2000 IU Vitamin D, 700mg Hi, I was looking for anyone who can tell me what exeperiences they have had taking and stopping spironolactone . I was recently on the drug for 7 months for acne. I decided to stop taking it due to... Their English is pretty stilted in those threads (don't they feel silly responding back and forth to themselves?) but it's good to know that there are so many scammers or bots out there. Thank you for sharing your story. I hope the surrogacy in the Ukraine goes really smoothly for you and your husband. I was also recently diagnosed with ADHD. My parents never really noticed because I... Continue reading >>

Can Metformin And Biotin Be Taken Together

Can Metformin And Biotin Be Taken Together

Please visit the new WebMD Message Boards to find answers and get support. If they are both drugs, then most likely not, because it could cause liver failure. Do not try this because the outcome may not be what you desire. My opinion is that you should take one type. It will be safer and taking both could overdose you. Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, blogs, or WebMD Answers are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service, or treatment. Do not consider WebMD User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately. Continue reading >>

Biotin And Metformin Interaction | Treato

Biotin And Metformin Interaction | Treato

Biotin and Hair Loss Metformin and PCOS Biotin and Methylsulfonylmethane Metformin and Diabetes Biotin and Multivitamin Metformin and Clomid Biotin and B Complex Metformin and Weight Loss Biotin and Vitamins Metformin and Pregnancy Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Drugs - Biotin - Usage, Dosage, Interactions, Images - Aarp

Drugs - Biotin - Usage, Dosage, Interactions, Images - Aarp

ARP [N-(Aminooxyacetyl)-N-(D-biotinoyl) hydrazine], biocytin, biotin-alkaline phosphate, biotin cadaverine, biotin nitrilotriacetic acid, biotin NTA , biotin-PEO4-amine, Biotin-PEO2-PPO2-amine, biotin-PEO3-maleimide, biotin-PEO4-propionate succinimidyl ester, biotinidase, coenzyme R , D-biotincis-hexahydro-2-oxo-1H-thieno[3,4-d]-imidazole-4-valeric acid, dUTP biotin, factor alpha, tripotassium salt (BNTA), vitamin Bw, vitamin H, W factor. Note: This review does not cover the use of biotin in radioimmunotherapy (radioactive therapy) or radio-labeling for diagnostic procedures. Biotin is an essential water-soluble B vitamin. The name biotin is taken from the Greek word bios meaning "life." Without biotin, certain enzymes do not work properly and various complications can occur involving the skin, intestinal tract, and nervous system. Metabolic problems including very low blood sugars between meals, high blood ammonia, or acidic blood ( acidosis ) can occur. Death is theoretically possible, although no clear cases have been reported. Recent studies suggest that biotin is also necessary for processes on the genetic level in cells (DNA replication and gene expression). Biotin deficiency is extremely rare. This is because daily biotin requirements are relatively small, biotin is found in many foods, and the body is able to recycle much of the biotin it has already used. Significant toxicity has not been reported in the available literature with biotin intake. DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. Biotin deficiency: Biotin deficiency is extremely rare. Some potential causes of biotin deficie Continue reading >>

Supplements For Type Ii...

Supplements For Type Ii...

Friend Type II on Metformin since May 2010 I take Metformin, lisinopril and a low dose aspirin each day. I take a Costco multivitamin ( the over 50 one What do other folks find that helps type II? I discussed cinnamon earlier. Green tea? Chromium? Magnesium? I take Metformin, lisinopril and a low dose aspirin each day. I take a Costco multivitamin ( the over 50 one What do other folks find that helps type II? I discussed cinnamon earlier. Green tea? Chromium? Magnesium? I have, at one time or another, taken almost every known supplement. Right now I take a good multivitamin, extra zinc, C (3 grams/day), E, B complex, extra B-12, chromium, vit D, calcium/magnesium, fish oil, CoQ-10, alpha lipoic acid, evening primrose oil, and probably a couple I've forgotten. I think the anti-oxidants are the most important. I put cinnamon in my morning coffee (just started recently), and drink green tea all day just because I like it. I've also just started taking Braggs apple cider vinegar again (I mix a little with water and stevia and it's sort of like lemonade). None of it does any good with my blood sugar, but I don't have any other health problems. Who knows, maybe I'd be dead if I wasn't taking all this stuff 1000 IU appears to be a safer level for supplementation than anything higher, and if you don't know what your levels are you should not supplement with more until you can check those levels out. I have just started supplementing Vitamin D at 1000 IU a day (only supplement or vitamin I take atm - I try to get all my nutrients if possible from my diet) as per my Endo and GP's recommendation. My level was a little lower than the low end of the lab range but both said that 1000 IU a day should bring up my levels slowly (I did ask my GP if I should start on 2000 IU a day and sh Continue reading >>

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

The most common medication used in women with PCOS is the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Research is strongly showing that long-term use of metformin and at high doses (1.5mg or higher daily) can deplete levels of vitamin B12. A deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause permanent neurological and nerve damage as well as mood changes and decreased energy. Here’s what you need to know to avoid a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take metformin. About Metformin Metformin is a medication that became available in the U.S. in 1995 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the most widely used medication used to lower insulin levels in those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Other names for metformin include glucophage, glucophage XR, glumetza, and fortamet. Metformin lowers blood glucose levels in three ways: It suppresses the liver’s production of glucose. It increases the sensitivity of your liver, muscle, fat, and cells to the insulin your body makes. It slows the absorption of carbohydrates you consume Metformin use may affect the absorption of vitamin B12 possibly through alterations in intestinal mobility, increased bacterial overgrowth, or alterations of the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex. Metformin can cause a malabsorption in B12 due to digestive changes, which leads to the binding of B12-intrinsic factor complex (intrinsic factor is needed to absorb B12 in the gut) and a reduction of B12 absorption. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Metformin Users The largest study thus far to examine the link between metformin and vitamin B12 is the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DDPOS). This study looked at B12 levels of individuals with prediabetes who took 850 mg Metformin 2x/day and compared them to those taking a placebo. At 5 years, 4.3% of the metformin users had Continue reading >>

Biotin And Metformin Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Biotin And Metformin Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

Does Cinnamon Conflict With Metformin?

I've heard that cinnamon helps control blood sugar. How much truth is there to this, and would it in any way conflict with me taking metformin? Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication: Disadvantages & Other Considerations

Diabetes Medication: Disadvantages & Other Considerations

DISADVANTAGES OF INSULIN SENSITIZERS AND INSULIN MIMETICS Although insulin mimetics and insulin-sensitizing agents are some of the best tools we have for controlling blood sugars, they are not without their difficulties. Since alpha lipoic acid and evening primrose oil are not prescription drugs in most countries (Germany is a notable exception), they are not covered by most health insurance. Alpha lipoic acid is not inexpensive; at this writing, a supply of 60 Alpha Lipoic Sustain 300 mg tablets costs about $30–$40. ALA reduces body stores of biotin, a substance that aids in the utilization of protein and a variety of other nutrients, so when you take alpha lipoic acid, you might be wise to take biotin supplements also. Your biotin intake should theoretically equal about 1 percent of your alpha lipoic acid intake, so if you are taking 1,800 mg ALA per day, in theory you would take about 18 mg of biotin. Most of my patients who use alpha lipoic acid don’t take more than about 15 mg biotin per day, and they experience no apparent adverse effects. Most preparations come only in 1 mg strengths.* You can take the biotin once daily. Metformin has a very low side-effects profile, with the exception of gastrointestinal distress—queasiness, nausea, diarrhea, or a slight bellyache—in as many as a third of the people who try the non– timed-release version. Most people who experience such discomfort, however, find that it diminishes as they become accustomed to the medication. Only a very few patients can’t tolerate it at all. (Some patients, particularly obese people who are anxious to achieve the weight loss that metformin can facilitate, will ignore any initial gastrointestinal distress and use an antacid drug such as Pepcid or Tagamet for relief. Others, who may on Continue reading >>

Biotin And Pcos- Warning

Biotin And Pcos- Warning

So I used the handy dandy little search bar for a problem I was having recently and I have discovered a HUGEproblem. Big enough for me to think I should warn others about. So I have pretty horrible PCOS and I thought losing weight would really help with my symptoms, including the whole "turning into a man" thing. I have hairloss from PCOS and also thehair popping up where it isn't supposed to (shut up guys!) so anyway the thought of losing MORE hair after surgery was very scary to me. I started taking 5000 mcg of biotin before surgery and ever since. My hair GROWTH issues got worse (on every other part of my body) and I figured my stomach wasn't absorbing my meds anymore and I freaked out. When I say it got worse, I'm talking about CRAZYfast growth and NEWhair. Unacceptable. I mean un-******g-acceptable beyond words. So I used the handy dandy search bar and found out that it's the damn biotin. Yeah, it makes the hair on your head grow in faster but it makes all your other body hair grow in faster and thicker and nicer too. Great!!! IF YOU HAVE PCOS WITH BODY HAIR ISSUES BE CAREFUL WITH BIOTIN BECAUSE YOU MIGHT HAVE MORE OF WHAT YOU DONT WANT! From what I was reading the people were saying that once their new hair showed up it never went away either. Needless to say, I stopped taking the biotin. I just wanted to share my discovery. I may be wrong, but there seems to be a direct connection between the two. I also understand that hormones go crazy after surgery but this here is ridiculous. I turned into a man within 3 months. We have a place here that has a 2 year guarantee but they won't do the guarantee if you have PCOS so you have to make sure you don't tell them about it. With the laser it gets the current hairs, but it won't prevent new hairs from growing in new foll Continue reading >>

Metformin By Sanis

Metformin By Sanis

Brand Name Metformin by Sanis Common Name metformin In this drug factsheet: DIN (Drug Identification Number) 02353377 METFORMIN BY SANIS 500MG Tablet 02343385 METFORMIN BY SANIS 850MG Tablet How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. How should I use this medication? The recommended adult dose of metformin ranges from 500 mg 3 or 4 times a day to 850 mg 2 or 3 ti Continue reading >>

Metformin Girls - Trying To Conceive | Forums | What To Expect

Metformin Girls - Trying To Conceive | Forums | What To Expect

See active discussions on Trying To Conceive Does anyone taking metformin for PCOS take extra B12, calcium or colic acid in addition to your prenatal? I know metformin causes nutrient deficiencies. Thank you! @SeattleUW I take metformin and prenatals, folic acid, b6, b50complex, baby aspirin, and d3 daily. I take metformin... I had no idea it can cause this. What is d3? I take Metformin 2x a day, prenatals, and folic acid. The prenatals I take cover most of the bases so I havent tried any other supplements. @dhughes11 D3 is a more bio available form of vitamin d (the vitamin your body produces from sunlight). @dhughes11 Yes I'm not out in the sunlight much as I wrk inside and never Hardly outside at all. @Wishbb4us Do you have to take it at a different time of day to be best absorbed? @SeattleUW I take synthroid and I can't have any vitamins with that and have to take it 4-5 hrs after or before I take synthroid so I take synthroid in am first thing when I temp and get out of bed, I take all vitamins and metformin at lunch and then just metformin at night Continue reading >>

Biotin And Metformin Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Biotin And Metformin Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Biotin and Metformin drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported among people who take Biotin and Metformin together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Biotin and Metformin. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 651 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 651 people who take Biotin, Metformin are studied. Most common drug interactions over time *: Cerebrovascular accident (sudden death of some brain cells due to lack of oxygen when the blood flow to the brain is impaired by blockage or rupture) Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Exostosis (formation of new bone on the surface of a bone) Glaucoma (increased fluid pressure in the eye with vision loss) Flatulence (flatus expelled through the anus) Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness) Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Most common drug interactions by gender *: Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Hyperhidrosis (abnormally increased sweating) Dysphagia (condition in which swallowing is difficult or painful) Malaise (a feeling of general discomfort or uneasiness) Cholecystitis chronic (long lasting infection of gallbladder) Cholelithiasis (the presence or formation of gallstones in the gallbladder or bile ducts) Cerebrovascular accident (sudden death of some brain cells due to lack of oxygen when the blood flow to the brain is impaired by blockage or rupture) Hemicephalalgia (headache affecting one side of the head) Hemipare Continue reading >>

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