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Best Yogurt For Gestational Diabetes

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a serving a day of yogurt may lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "The data we have gathered show that yogurt consumption can have significant benefit in reducing the risk of diabetes," said senior study author Dr. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston. "It's not a huge effect, about an 18 percent reduction [in risk]." "Yogurt is not magic for curing or preventing diabetes," Hu said. "That's the bottom line and the message we want to convey to our consumers, that we have to pay attention to our diet pattern. There is no replacement for an overall healthy diet and maintaining [a healthy] body weight." The study is published online Nov. 24 in the journal BMC Medicine. It was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells develop a resistance to insulin, and blood sugar levels then get too high. For the study, Hu and his team pooled the result of three large studies that tracked the medical histories and lifestyle habits of health professionals: the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study of more than 51,000 male health professionals; the Nurses' Health Study, which included more than 121,000 women nurses; and the Nurses' Health Study II, which followed nearly 117,000 women nurses. During the study follow-up, there were about 15,000 cases of type 2 diabetes. When they looked at total dairy intake, they saw no effect on the risk of diabetes. However, when they zeroed in on yogurt, they found one serving a day was linked with about a 17 percent reduced risk. The researchers next pooled their result with other published studies that lo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

This is killing me, as I was diagnosed with GD. They've taken away everything I eat!!! I have always been very healthy and eat pretty well. At 31 weeks along I still run, in fact I placed 3rd in my age group at a 5k this weekend. But now I can't eat carbs mostly, either simple or complex. My question is this: What are some of the things you all eat, especially for breakfast? If I have to eat eggs for the next nine weeks, I'm gonna scream. Typically I normally eat cereal, either hot or cold, and toast for breakfast, lots of fruit, and pastas rest of the day. Also, what are some favorite dining out items, desserts included? @debbiepolson I am responding as someone who is a Dietitian/Diabetes educator. it sounds like you were not given very accurate advise in terms of eating to control GDM. Make sure you see a Registered Dietitian who special izes in diabetes. You will find that the diet is not that limited. Hi...I got diagnosed with GD in my 11th week, went on the GD diet and monitored my blood sugars 4x a day and by week 14, they changed my diagnosis to pre-GD (they think it may have been caused by the crinone I was orignally on to increase my progesterone..plus I have PCOS, so I am susceptible...) I am now only monitoring my diet and taking blood sugar 2x per day...I'm not finding the diet bad at all! Let me tell you some of the ways I eat...and I totally recommend meeting with a dietician/diabetic consultant...she was so helpful..I could not have done this without her! OK..breakfast..I do the same thing every morning..water, 2 egg beater omelette with a diff. veggie daily (I do best with either green or red peppers or spinach, but have also done broccoli. tomatoes, etc.), and also with mozzarella or provolone. Also, 1/2 whole wheat english muffin. Lunches/Snacks are t Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas For Someone With Gestational Diabetes

Breakfast Ideas For Someone With Gestational Diabetes

If you're pregnant or hope to become pregnant, you might be concerned about a possible complication -- gestational diabetes. This temporary condition develops when a woman's body becomes resistant to insulin produced by her pancreas, causing her blood-sugar levels to rise above healthy levels. It affects about 18 percent of pregnancies, according to the American Diabetes Association. Modifying your diet can help control gestational diabetes. Paying attention to breakfast -- the first meal of the day -- can start you off on a good eating plan. Check with your doctor or a registered dietitian for help developing the best diet for your pregnancy. Video of the Day Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, so carbohydrates have a direct impact on blood-sugar levels. Choosing the right types of carbs at breakfast helps your blood sugar rise slowly and steadily, without the spikes that require lots of insulin. The best choices are rich in fiber, which helps carbohydrates have a low-to-moderate effect on blood sugar. For example, a breakfast that includes a whole-grain cereal such as bran flakes or a whole-grain muffin, tends to raise blood sugar slowly. Oat bran is a good choice because of its high-fiber content, which also supports gastrointestinal health. Dairy products contain carbohydrates but still contribute to a healthy breakfast, when used in moderation. Add milk or yogurt to your breakfast, but the University of California Medical Center recommends consuming only 1 cup of dairy products at a time to keep blood sugar from spiking. Choose low-fat versions to manage your intake of saturated fat, which can contribute to high levels of blood cholesterol. If you use butter, spread it thinly or switch to a low-fat spread. Fresh fruit is generally a healthy food but i Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Gestational Diabetes

Healthy Eating For Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes (GDM) occurs when glucose levels in the blood are higher than usual during pregnancy. This can put the health of you and your baby at risk. Healthy eating specific for GDM can help achieve good blood glucose control and healthy weight gain for mother and baby during pregnancy. Carbohydrates ï‚· Carbohydrate is found in a variety of food and drink and provides the body with fuel (energy) ï‚· Many foods containing carbohydrate also provide fibre, vitamins and minerals ï‚· Carbohydrate breaks down into glucose during digestion and is absorbed into the blood stream ï‚· The type and quantity of carbohydrate you eat will affect your blood glucose levels Which Foods Contain Carbohydrates? Healthy Carbohydrate Choices Less Healthy Carbohydrate Choices  Wholegrain Bread  Wholegrain Breakfast Cereal  Grains e.g. Barley, Quinoa  Pasta, Noodles  Rice  Wholegrain & Wholemeal Flour  Lentils and Legumes  Starchy Vegetables - Potato, Sweet Potato, Corn  Fruit  Milk, Yoghurt ï¶ Biscuits ï¶ Cakes, Pastry ï¶ Sugar, Jam ï¶ Honey, Maple Syrup ï¶ Chocolate, Confectionary ï¶ Regular Soft Drink, Cordial ï¶ Fruit Juice ï¶ Potato Crisps, Corn Chips ï¶ Ice-cream, Custard Glycaemic Index Glycaemic Index (GI) is a measure of how quickly or slowly a carbohydrate food is digested and increases blood glucose levels. Higher GI Carbohydrates Increase blood glucose levels more quickly Choose these less often Lower GI Carbohydrates Increase blood glucose levels more slowly These are the preferred choice Summary of Lower and Higher Glycaemic Index Choices Remember that both the GI and the quantity of carbohydrate foods consumed will affect your blood glucose levels. Lower GI choices are prefer Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

Diabetes Diet - Gestational

For a balanced diet, you need to eat a variety of healthy foods. Reading food labels can help you make healthy choices when you shop. If you are a vegetarian or on a special diet, talk with your health care provider to make sure you're getting a balanced diet. In general, you should eat: Plenty of whole fruits and vegetables Moderate amounts of lean proteins and healthy fats Moderate amounts of whole grains, such as bread, cereal, pasta, and rice, plus starchy vegetables, such as corn and peas Fewer foods that have a lot of sugar, such as soft drinks, fruit juices, and pastries You should eat three small- to moderate-sized meals and one or more snacks each day. Do not skip meals and snacks. Keep the amount and types of food (carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) the same from day to day. This can help you keep your blood sugar stable. CARBOHYDRATES Less than half the calories you eat should come from carbohydrates. Most carbohydrates are found in starchy or sugary foods. They include bread, rice, pasta, cereal, potatoes, peas, corn, fruit, fruit juice, milk, yogurt, cookies, candy, soda, and other sweets. High-fiber, whole-grain carbohydrates are healthy choices. Vegetables are good for your health and your blood sugar. Enjoy lots of them. Carbohydrates in food are measured in grams. You can learn to count the amount of carbohydrates in the foods that you eat. GRAINS, BEANS, AND STARCHY VEGETABLES Eat 6 or more servings a day. One serving equals: 1 slice bread 1 ounce (28 grams) ready-to-eat cereal 1/2 cup (105 grams) cooked rice or pasta 1 English muffin Choose foods loaded with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and healthy carbohydrates. They include: Whole-grain breads and crackers Whole grain cereals Whole grains, such as barley or oats Beans Brown or wild rice Whole-wheat pa Continue reading >>

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

What Can I Eat If I Have Gestational Diabetes? Food List And More

Gestational diabetes is diabetes that only occurs in pregnant women. That means you can't get gestational diabetes unless you’re pregnant. You may develop gestational diabetes for the first time during pregnancy or you might have a mild undiagnosed case of diabetes that gets worse when you’re pregnant. During pregnancy, the way your body uses insulin changes. Insulin is a hormone that breaks the foods you eat down into glucose, or sugar. You then use that glucose for energy. You’ll naturally become more resistant to insulin when you’re pregnant to help provide your baby with more glucose. In some women, the process goes wrong and your body either stops responding to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin to give you the glucose you need. When that happens, you’ll have too much sugar in your blood. That causes gestational diabetes. If you have recently been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, or are curious about what will happen if you are diagnosed with it, keep reading to learn more about maintaining a healthy pregnancy. Eat protein with every meal. Include daily fruits and vegetables in your diet. Thirty percent or less of your diet should be made up of fat. Limit or avoid processed foods. Pay attention to portion sizes to avoid overeating. If you have gestational diabetes, maintaining a healthy, balanced diet may help you manage your symptoms without needing medication. In general, your diet should include protein plus the right mix of carbohydrates and fats. Once you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, ask your doctor about working with a registered dietitian or nutritionist. They can help you plan your meals and come up with an eating plan that will keep you and your baby healthy. Aim to base your meals around protein. Include lots of fresh foods a Continue reading >>

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Smooth, creamy, thick — Greek yogurt is one of the hottest foods around, and its popularity shows no signs of abating. With a pudding-like texture and a slightly tart flavor, Greek yogurt also has more protein and fewer carbs and fewer sugars than traditional yogurt. This means that Greek yogurt can be even better for people with type 2 diabetes, says Tami Ross, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator in Lexington, Kentucky. "My patients love the consistency of it," Ross explains. "Even the patients who are not big on yogurt or milk products overwhelmingly seem to like Greek yogurt." Greek yogurt's thick consistency comes from straining it to remove liquid whey. This process increases the amount of protein per serving and removes some of the carbohydrates, which people with diabetes must watch carefully. "For folks with diabetes, the lower carbs are a plus," Ross notes. "You can work in the yogurt for a snack without having to account for so many carbohydrates." The increased protein can also help you feel that you've had a more substantial snack, so you'll feel more satisfied and won't be hungry for something else quite so quickly. "In terms of promoting satiety and helping people feel full, it's great," Ross says. And starting your day with Greek yogurt may even help you manage your blood sugar throughout the day. Eating low-GI foods for breakfast helps prevent blood-sugar spikes later on, one recent study found. How to Find the Right Greek Yogurt Of course, not all Greek yogurts are created equal. With many brands and flavors on the market, it's important to read nutrition labels carefully to find one that will work with a diabetes-friendly diet. Carbohydrate content is the most important item to look for on the nutrition label of Greek yogurt, since it accounts for the sugar Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Yogurt Low-fat yogurt naturally contains both high-quality carbohydrates and protein, making it an excellent food for slowing or preventing an unhealthy rise in blood sugar. Studies also show that a diet high in calcium from yogurt and other calcium-rich foods is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Be sure to stick to low-fat or nonfat brands; fat-free Greek yogurt is my top pick because it has twice as much protein as regular nonfat yogurt. Previous Next More Photos Almonds Fish Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

Top 5 Snacks For Gestational Diabetes

Top 5 Snacks For Gestational Diabetes

You are here: Home / baby / Top 5 Snacks for Gestational Diabetes If you followed me earlier this year, you know that I had to deal with gestational diabetes in my third trimester. I wrote about it for Mamavation , and I probably still have a post in me on meal ideas. Today, lets talk about my top 5 snacks for gestational diabetes. Note: Im not a registered dietician, so please check with your doctor before you start gorging. These snacks worked for me and my glucose levels. 5. Fage Greek Yogurt 2% fat I couldnt have yogurt in the mornings because of the sugar, but I could have it as an afternoon snack. I loved Fages strawberry yogurt in the individual cups. It had the protein I needed to counter the carbs. The plain yogurt was great because you could add fresh fruit. 4. Any combinations of cheese, nuts, and fruit Fruit is full of sugar so youve got to watch how much you can have. With grapes, I had to count 17 grapes out. Id also cut up strawberries and measure them to a 1/2 cup. Yep, hard but worth it because it kept my glucose level down. Cheese and nuts are great sources of fat and protein, which helped balance out the fruit. Nuts. I must have kept Trader Joes in business, just by buying their bags of unsalted cashews and almonds! 1/4 cup of nuts plus fruit or cheese was my other go-to snack. I also ate a lot of apples, peaches, and nectarines with cheese or nuts or nut butter. Theres something to be said about An apple a day keeps the doctor away. I think it did for me, and Im not a big apple eater. 3. PowerCrunch protein bars These were one of my favorite brands of protein bars while dealing with gestational diabetes. It tasted like a chocolate bar but packed enough protein to counter the carbs. It was also NOT sweetened by stevia a total win in my book. Theyre l Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

What Yogurt? - Gestational Diabetes - Babycenter Australia

What Yogurt? - Gestational Diabetes - Babycenter Australia

Get expert guidance from the world's #1 pregnancy and parenting resource, delivered via email, our app, and website. We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the Health On the Net Foundation . Verify here . All contents copyright BabyCenter, L.L.C. 1997-2019 All rights reserved. This Internet site provides information of a general nature and is designed for educational purposes only. If you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child, you should always consult with a doctor or other healthcare professional. Please review the Terms of Use before using this site. Your use of the site indicates your agreement to be bound by the Terms of Use . This site is published by BabyCenter, L.L.C., which is responsible for its contents as further described and qualified in the Terms of Use . Support for your parenting journey. Delivered to your inbox. Keep up with your babys development with personalised weekly newsletters. Get the latest parenting news, plus expert advice and real-world wisdom. Receive discounts, deals and parenting information from BabyCenters partners. Continue reading >>

Eating Well With Gestational Diabetes

Eating Well With Gestational Diabetes

Eating Well with Gestational Diabetes Melissa is a registered dietitian, mommy to two beautiful girls and the woman behind Fit Fab Mommy. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that women get while pregnant (during gestation). In simple terms, diabetes occurs when you have high levels of sugar (glucose) in your blood, either because your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t use it properly, therefore sugar remains in your blood stream instead of moving into cells or converting to energy, as it should. While some women are considered higher risk for gestational diabetes, anyone can get it. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can make a mother insulin resistant, which means your body is not able to make enough insulin or use it efficiently, causing glucose to build up in the blood (also known as hyperglycemia). While most women with gestational diabetes don’t remain diabetic once the baby is born they are at higher risk of developing it in subsequent pregnancies and becoming diabetic later in life. Expectant mothers are screened for gestational diabetes around 24-28 weeks (or sooner if you are considered high risk for diabetes) with a glucose-screening test. This is that sickeningly sweet drink you have to chug down in five minutes (hopefully the morning sickness has subsided by now) that can identify if you have a problem. If you test positive it doesn’t necessarily mean you have gestational diabetes (it is just a screening test, not a diagnostic test), it means you need to take another test called the glucose tolerance test, which is much longer (3 hours) and will diagnose if you in fact have gestational diabetes. You are considered high risk for gestational diabetes if you are obese, had gestational diabetes with a previous pregnancy, have sugar i Continue reading >>

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