diabetestalk.net

Best Wine For Diabetics

Is Red Wine Good For Diabetics? Study Claims The Tipple’s Main Antioxidant Can Help Reduce Artery Stiffness For Type 2 Sufferers

Is Red Wine Good For Diabetics? Study Claims The Tipple’s Main Antioxidant Can Help Reduce Artery Stiffness For Type 2 Sufferers

Many people count a glass of red wine as one of their guilty pleasures. Yet, drinking the occasional Merlot may protect type 2 diabetes patients from heart attacks and strokes. Researchers have found an antioxidant, known as resveratrol, in red wine reduces artery stiffness in type 2 diabetics, which is a known cause of heart-related illness. Study author Dr Naomi Hamburg, chief of vascular biology, Boston University School of Medicine, said: 'This adds to emerging evidence that there may be interventions that may reverse the blood vessel abnormalities that occur with aging and are more pronounced in people with type 2 diabetes and obesity.' Resveratrol is found in the skin of red grapes and gives wine its color. It is also found in peanuts and berries. Researchers from Boston University measured the stiffness of the body's main artery, known as the aorta, in 57 type 2 diabetes patients. Patients then consumed daily doses of 100mg resveratrol for two weeks, followed by a 300mg dose every day for a fortnight and finally a placebo for four weeks. Of those with high aortic stiffness at the start of the study, the 300mg dose improved flexibility by 9.1 percent and the 100mg dose by 4.8 percent, while stiffness worsened with placebo. This effect was not seen in patients without aortic stiffness at the start of the study. Dr Hamburg said: 'The effect of resveratrol may be more about improving structural changes in the aorta and less about the relaxation of blood vessels, and people with more normal aortic stiffness may not get as much benefit. Results will be presented at the Peripheral Vascular Disease 2017 Scientific Sessions in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This comes after Professor Gordon Shepherd from the Yale School of Medicine said drinking red wine sparks reactions in the Continue reading >>

A Glass Of Wine A Day May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

A Glass Of Wine A Day May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

If you're in the habit of drinking wine with dinner, there may be a bonus beyond the enjoyment of sipping a glass at night. A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine adds to the evidence that drinking a moderate amount of wine can be good for your health. The evidence comes from a new two-year-long study on people with diabetes. Researcher Iris Shai of Ben Gurion University says in Israel and elsewhere, lots of people with diabetes get the message that alcohol — even in moderation — can be harmful. "There is a myth that alcohol is not so safe for them," Shai says. In order to test the influence of wine on people with diabetes, Shai recruited about 225 people who already had elevated blood sugar, and they agreed to follow a Mediterranean style diet for two years. Everyone in the study was eating the same mix of foods but when it came to what to drink, some began drinking one glass of red wine per day, some began drinking one glass of white wine per day and others drank mineral water. And at the end of the study? "We found that a glass of red wine with dinner can improve the cardiovascular health of people with Type 2 diabetes," Shai says. In particular, Shai found that compared to people who drank mineral water with dinner, the wine drinkers — both those who drank white and red — benefited from improvements in blood sugar control. And the red wine drinkers got an additional benefit: They saw improvements in their levels of good cholesterol. The effects are not huge, but physician Christopher Wilcox of Georgetown University Medical Center says they could be significant. "One glass of alcohol per day had these admittedly modest but worthwhile benefits," he says. There's been a lot of interest in the idea that specific compounds in red wine may help p Continue reading >>

Drinking Wine Is Linked To A Lower Risk Of Diabetes

Drinking Wine Is Linked To A Lower Risk Of Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Drinking alcohol—especially wine—every few days may help protect against type 2 diabetes, suggests a new study published in the journal Diabetologia. People in the study who drank three to four days a week were about 30% less likely to develop diabetes than those who drank less than once a week. This isn’t the first study to find a link between drinking moderately—having up to 7 drinks a week for women and up to 14 drinks a week for men—and a reduced diabetes risk, compared to not drinking at all. (Heavy drinking, however, is known to increase the risk of diabetes.) For the new study, researchers analyzed data from more than 70,000 healthy Danish adults who were surveyed about their health and drinking habits around 2007. They tracked them for five years to see who developed type 2 diabetes. People who had the lowest risk for diabetes were those who drank alcohol at moderate—and slightly more than moderate—levels. Men who drank 14 drinks a week had a 43% lower risk of diabetes than men who did not drink at all; women who drank nine drinks a week had a 58% reduced risk. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now The timing of those drinks also mattered. Drinking three to four days a week was linked to the biggest risk reduction. For women, very infrequent drinking (less than one day a week) was also associated with slightly lower diabetes rates, compared to being a lifetime abstainer. “For the same total weekly amount of alcohol, spreading it out on more days is better than drinking it all together,” said lead author Janne Tolstrup, professor of epidemiology and intervention research at the University of Southern Denmark’s Nati Continue reading >>

Drinking Red Wine Regularly Reduces Risk Of Diabetes

Drinking Red Wine Regularly Reduces Risk Of Diabetes

Drinking red wine three to four times a week lowers the risk of developing type 2 diabetes according to a recent study by Danish researchers. The study, carried out on over 70,000 people over five years, was published in Diabetologia and monitored how much and how often they drank. The results found that drinking moderately three to four times a week reduced a woman’s risk of type 2 diabetes by 32%, while it lowered a man’s risk by 27%. Red wine was found to be particularly beneficial to lowering the risk of developing diabetes because the polyphenols in red wine help to manage blood sugar levels, according to the study. Men who drink one to six beers a week lowered their risk of diabetes by 21% but there was no impact on women’s risk. Meanwhile, a high intake of spirits among women significantly increased their risk of diabetes, while there was no effect in men. Experts warned that the results shouldn’t be treated as a “green light” to drink in excess of the existing NHS guidelines – 14 units of alcohol a week. “We found that drinking frequency has an independent effect from the amount of alcohol taken. “It’s better to drink the alcohol in four portions rather than all at once,” said Prof Janne Tolstrup, from the National Institute of Public Health of the University of Southern Denmark. The study also found that drinking moderately a few times a week lowered the risk of cardiovascular disorders, such as heart attacks and strokes. Continue reading >>

Nightly Glass Of Wine May Be A Plus For Type 2 Diabetics

Nightly Glass Of Wine May Be A Plus For Type 2 Diabetics

Nightly glass of wine may be a plus for type 2 diabetics A glass of red wine at dinner is safe and may even be beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes, a new trial suggests. Red wine may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes~iStock People who followed a healthy diet and drank a glass of red wine at dinner for two years ended up with better HDL or "good" cholesterol and other good health-related factors than people on the same diet who drank mineral water, researchers found. But what the findings actually mean for individual patients needs to be interpreted cautiously, and with careful medical follow-up, said Iris Shai, the study's senior author from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Beer Sheva, Israel. The risks and benefits of alcoholuse among people with diabetes have been controversial, Shai and her colleagues write in Annals of Internal Medicine. While studies suggest possible benefits to moderate alcohol use, both with diabetes and without it, it's questionable whether doctors should tell their diabetes patients to drink, they say. For the new study, the researchers randomly assigned 224 adults with type 2 diabetes , ages 40 to 75, to drink 150 milliliters (about 5 ounces) of either mineral water, white wine or red wine with dinner for two years. The participants were previously not alcohol drinkers. As part of the study, they also followed a Mediterranean diet, which has been found to be beneficial for heart health. Overall, 87 percent completed the trial, with 80 percent drinking their daily dose of wine. At the end of the study, people who drank red wine with dinner increased their "good" HDL cholesterol, which helps removes LDL or "bad" cholesterol from the arteries . They also lowered their risk of heart disease, as indicated by a lower ratio of total cholest Continue reading >>

Wine For Type 2 Diabetic Patients?

Wine For Type 2 Diabetic Patients?

Abstract To ensure an acceptable quality of life for Type 2 diabetic patients, the food recommendations have to be as liberal and individualized as possible. Unfortunately, disagreements exists about the consumption of different types of wine. Diabetic patients are advised by some to restrain their wine intake and to use dry wine containing little carbohydrate, while others are more liberal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of dry and sweet wine on the glycaemic control in Type 2 diabetes. Twelve diabetic patients consumed a light meal with either 300 ml tap water 300 ml dry white wine, 300 ml sweet white wine with ethanol added or 300 ml dry white wine with glucose added. Similar glucose, insulin, and triglyceride responses were obtained in all four situations. There was a greater suppression of the free fatty acid levels in the three situations with wine as compared with water (p < 0.001). This effect may be caused by an attenuation of the free fatty acid mobilization and esterification of free fatty acids to triglycerides induced by alcohol. Our results indicate that patients with well-controlled Type 2 diabetes can drink moderate amounts of wine with meals without risking acute deterioration of glycaemic control. Whether the wine is dry or sweet has no impact on the glycaemic control. Continue reading >>

Is Red Wine At Dinner Good For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Red Wine At Dinner Good For Type 2 Diabetes?

A glass of red wine each evening with dinner may offer heart health perks to people with type 2 diabetes. A two-year study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine is the first long-term study aimed at assessing the effects and safety of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol in people with type 2 diabetes, who are more at risk for developing cardiovascular disease than the general population. Those with type 2 diabetes also tend to have lower levels of HDL, the "good" cholesterol. The researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev reported that over two years, red wine helped improve signs of cardiac health by modestly increasing levels of HDL cholesterol and lowering overall cholesterol. The randomized controlled intervention trial involved 224 controlled diabetes patients aged 45 to 75, who generally abstained from alcohol. The patients were randomly assigned to drink 5 ounces of red wine, white wine, or mineral water (the control group) with their dinner for two years. They were all given instructions to follow a well-balanced Mediterranean diet plan that did not have a calorie restriction. The researchers performed genetic tests that showed how quickly the patients metabolized alcohol, as well as various lipid (cholesterol) tests. They also measured glucose control, blood pressure, liver function tests, medication use, and other symptoms at several time points during the two-year follow-up. Compared with the group that drank water, patients in the red wine group had improvements in their lipid tests, the study showed. "Red wine was found to be superior in improving overall metabolic profiles, mainly by modestly improving the lipid profile, by increasing good HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1, one of the major constituents of HDL cholesterol, while decrea Continue reading >>

Red Or White Wine? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Red Or White Wine? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » Either as long as they're dry. If sweet they'll be richer in carbs. I always go for a Cabernet. From Google - Research has shown that drinking white wine helps keep lung tissues healthy. Cons: White wines are the most acidic, meaning they're the worst for your teeth. In addition, whites contain far less of the heart-healthy and cancer-preventing antioxidants than reds do, and have about the same amount of calories.25 Feb 2016 A couple of glasses of dry red wine like a merlot doesn't affect my BG control. I find red wine has a negligible effect on bg levels. Prosecco - very dry - doesn't affect my BG at all. I can't drink white - instant indigestion Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member Dry and strong is best so all the sugar has been fermented out! Although, I think you should treat some of the studies with some caution. Personally, I like a nice bottle (not all at once) As with everything it's about personal preference. You can always check bs after a glass, allow time to get into system, to see if either has an effect on your bloods. Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family. Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android Continue reading >>

Does Wine Help Or Harm People With Diabetes?

Does Wine Help Or Harm People With Diabetes?

With commentary from study author Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Doctors have long faced a paradox when advising their patients with type 2 diabetes on drinking alcohol. Moderate drinking has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, which would benefit people with diabetes who are at increased risk of the disease. Yet, people with diabetes have traditionally been advised to reduce their alcohol consumption to help better control their glucose levels. Now preliminary results of a new study presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Prague, found that adults with diabetes may be able to safely drink in moderation and reap the heart benefits. The study randomly assigned 224 patients with controlled type 2 diabetes to have either mineral water, white wine or red wine (about a 5-ounce serving of wine) with dinner every night for two years. All patients were following a healthy Mediterranean diet with no calorie restrictions. Researchers found that red-wine drinkers had a modest improvement in high-density lipoproteins (HDL), the good cholesterol, and also had improved apolipoprotein A1, a component of HDL. Those who drank red or white wine also saw modest improvements in glucose metabolism. Drinking one 5-ounce serving of red or white wine wasn’t associated with any negative effect on medication use, blood pressure or liver function tests. “Obviously excess drinking is harmful, but there is no good evidence to discourage moderate consumption among diabetics who have no other contraindication,” says Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and one of the authors of the study. “This first long-term large scale alc Continue reading >>

Slideshow: Diabetes-friendly Drinks And Cocktails

Slideshow: Diabetes-friendly Drinks And Cocktails

Drink in Moderation Most people with diabetes can enjoy some alcohol. Rules are the same as for everyone else: one drink per day for women; two for men. But you need to know how alcohol affects your blood sugar. A sugary drink might spike your blood sugar. But if you drink on an empty stomach or take certain meds, your levels could swing too low. A 12-ounce beer has about 15 grams of carbohydrates, compared to 3 to 6 grams in light beer. Also, “light” and “low carb” are pretty much the same thing -- and also your best bet. Be careful with craft beers. Most have twice the alcohol and calories as regular beer. Some research says wine (red or white) may help your body use insulin better and may even make you less likely to get type 2 diabetes in the first place. It may also have heart benefits, to boot! Moderation is the key as too much alcohol can cause hypoglycemia. A standard 5-ounce serving has about 120 calories, nearly all of which come from alcohol, not carbs. Recipes vary, but depending on the fruit and juices involved, this drink may have as much sugar as a regular soda. Instead of sangria, go with one glass of dry red or white wine. Those only have about 4 grams of carbs. Avoid sweeter varieties, like flavored wines and dessert wines. One ounce of liquor, depending on the proof, has about the same amount of alcohol as 5 ounces of wine. While liquor is often carb-free, mixers like soda and juice can send blood sugar levels through the roof. To prevent a spike, mix your liquor with a calorie-free drink like water or seltzer. Sweet drinks like margaritas and mojitos don’t have to be off-limits. Use sugar-free mixers for margaritas and fresh fruit for daiquiris. And instead of pouring simple syrup into mojitos and martinis, try a natural sweetener like stev Continue reading >>

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Adults with diabetes are up to two to four times as likely to have heart disease than people who don’t have diabetes, says the American Heart Association. Some evidence suggests that drinking moderate amounts of red wine could lessen the risk of heart disease, but other sources caution people with diabetes against drinking, period. So what’s the deal? A few words on diabetes More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. That’s nearly 1 in 10 people, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Most cases of the disease are type 2 diabetes — a condition in which the body doesn’t make enough insulin, uses insulin incorrectly, or both. This can cause high levels of sugar in the blood. People with type 2 diabetes must control this sugar, or blood glucose, with a combination of medications, like insulin, and lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise. Diet is key to diabetes management. Found in many foods such as breads, starches, fruits, and sweets, carbohydrate is the macronutrient that causes blood sugar levels to go up. Managing carbohydrate intake helps people manage their blood sugar. But contrary to popular belief, alcohol may actually cause blood sugar levels to go down instead of up. How red wine affects blood sugar According to the American Diabetes Association, drinking red wine — or any alcoholic beverage — can lower blood sugar for up to 24 hours. Because of this, they recommend checking your blood sugar before you drink, while you drink, and monitoring it for up to 24 hours after drinking. Intoxication and low blood sugar can share many of the same symptoms, so failing to check your blood glucose could cause others to assume you’re feeling the effects of an alcoholic beverage when in realit Continue reading >>

Red Wine 'benefits People With Type 2 Diabetes'

Red Wine 'benefits People With Type 2 Diabetes'

A glass of red wine a day can improve cardiac health and help manage cholesterol for patients with type 2 diabetes, according to findings in a 2-year study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. Moderate alcohol consumption has been linked to improved cardiovascular and total mortality rates, and a glass of red wine a day as part of a healthy diet has been considered beneficial for some time. There is evidence that type 2 diabetes is less prevalent among moderate drinkers, yet the risk-benefit balance is controversial for such patients, due to a lack of long-term randomized studies. Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev-Soroka Medical Center and Nuclear Research Center Negev, Israel, wondered if both red and white wine might improve glucose control, depending on alcohol metabolism and genetic profiling. Previous research has suggested that ethanol (alcohol) is the key, meaning that alcoholic drinks other than red wine could be equally beneficial; others claim that red wine has particularly advantageous properties. Potential benefits for people with type 2 diabetes People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease, as well as lower levels of "good" HDL cholesterol. High levels of HDL cholesterol can reduce the risk for heart disease and stroke, as it absorbs cholesterol and carries it back to the liver, where it is flushed from the body. 29.1 million people in the US probably have diabetes, or 9.3% of the population 21 million have been diagnosed An estimated further 8.1 million have not been diagnosed. Should patients with type 2 diabetes be recommended to take up moderate alcohol consumption? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) leave the decision to the individual; the American Heart Association (AHA) recommen Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Alcohol

Diabetes & Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions. Alcohol can also affect diabetic nerve damage, eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. You may wonder if drinking alcohol is safe for people with diabetes. If you drink alcohol, there are some things you need to know first about alcohol safety. Is it Safe to Drink Alcohol? Check with your doctor to make sure alcohol doesn’t interfere with your medications or complicate any of your medical conditions. Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions, especially if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas. Alcohol can also affect other medical conditions you may have, like diabetic nerve damage, diabetic eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. Get guidelines for alcohol use from your medical provider. How Much Alcohol Can I Drink? If you choose to drink alcohol, drink in moderation. Limit your intake of alcohol to no more than one serving per day for women, and no more than two servings per day for men. One serving size of alcohol equals: 12 ounces of beer 5 ounces of wine 1½ ounces of distilled spirits (such as rum, whiskey, gin, etc.) Alcohol and Risk of Low Blood Sugar If you are managing your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, drinking alcohol can stil increase your risk of low blood sugars. And if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate insulin production, drinking alcohol can lead to even more serious low blood sugar reactions. Normally, the liver releases glucose to maintain blood sugar levels. But when you drink alcohol, the liver is busy breaking the alcohol down, so it does a poor job of releasing glucose into the bloodstream. This can lead to a drop in blood sugar levels if you are drinking alco Continue reading >>

Ask The Diet Doctor: Wine On A Low-sugar Diet

Ask The Diet Doctor: Wine On A Low-sugar Diet

Q: If I’m avoiding sugar, can I still drink wine? A: Yes, even if you’re cutting back on carbs and sugars, there’s still a place for an evening glass of pinot noir in your diet. [Tweet this good news!] I have yet to find a client (outside of extreme competition dieting) who needed to eliminate wine completely in order to reach any sort of health goal. Not that you need another reason to drink vino, but it is actually healthy for you. Some population-based studies show a relationship between wine intake and improvements in insulin sensitivity. This makes your body more efficient at using carbs, which leads to better health and easier fat loss. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women who drank two glasses of wine a day for eight weeks experienced a 7-percent increase in insulin sensitivity. Wine has also long been considered one of the key health-promoting components of the Mediterranean diet. RELATED: Your Guide to Low-Calorie Cocktails There are two things to keep in mind when imbibing on a low-sugar diet. 1. Dry wines contain minimal sugars. Choosing red or white doesn’t matter as much as opting for dry over sweet. Dry wines generally have less than 1 gram (g) of carbohydrates (sugars) per ounce while the carb content of sweet wines can be upwards of 1.5 to 2g per ounce. These sugars can add up quickly: Technically one serving of wine is five ounces, but six to nine ounces is generally more realistic, especially when you’re pouring a glass at home to unwind. However, it is impossible (and unnecessary) to avoid sugar completely, so just adjust your wine intake to fit your personal sugar guidelines. Dry Reds Pinot noir: 0.68g carbs per ounce Cabernet franc: 0.71g Merlot: 0.74g Cabernet sauvignon: 0.75g Shiraz/syra Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 Diabetes. What Types Of Wine Are Safer To Drink In Terms Of Sugar Content?

I Have Type 1 Diabetes. What Types Of Wine Are Safer To Drink In Terms Of Sugar Content?

Open this photo in gallery: The question I'm a 50-year-old who loves wine but also has been fighting type 1 diabetes for almost 35 years. Other than the obvious ice wines, ports, etc., are there particular grapes that could be considered higher in carbohydrate (sugar) count than others? Does red versus white versus rosé make a difference? The answer Although I've "prescribed" a few wines to physicians who've asked for recommendations, I myself am no doctor. Nor am I a chemist. So take what I'm about to say for what it's worth. You're certainly on the right track by avoiding sweet beverages such as icewine and port. Sugar is a diabetic's enemy, and those wines have plenty. When it comes to "dry" wines (I put that in quotation marks because there's always at least a trace of sugar even in the driest wines), the best choice generally is red. As a category, red wines tend to be lower in sugar than white or rosé. It all depends on the specific wine; some reds, such as Yellowtail Shiraz from Australia, are sweeter than, say, a typical white Sancerre from France. I would also go so far as to say that European reds are more likely – speaking very, very generally – to be drier that those from very sunny New World regions, such as California and South Australia. That said, the tiny differences in sugar concentration are unlikely to make much of a difference if you intend to drink no more than a glass or two over the course of a couple of hours. If you're on prescribed medication, including insulin, and I suspect you are, you should absolutely consult with a doctor or nutritionist experienced with diabetes. Health experts I've spoken with would say that sugar is not your only concern. Alcohol plays into the equation. After drinking alcohol, you may experience low blood gluco Continue reading >>

More in diabetes