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Best Vitamins For Diabetics Type 1

Alternative Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Alternative Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes doesn't just affect blood sugar and insulin secretion—it also can lead to a host of other problems including kidney damage, blood vessel thickening, nerve damage and pain. Find out more below about common alternative and complementary methods, vitamins, minerals, herbs and foods used to treat type 2 diabetes and other conditions associated with it. Acetyl L-Carnitine In a double-blind study of people with diabetic neuropathy, supplementing with acetyl-L-carnitine was significantly more effective than a placebo in improving subjective symptoms of neuropathy and objective measures of nerve function. People who received 1,000 mg of acetyl-L-carnitine three times per day tended to fare better than those who received 500 mg three times per day. Aloe Two small controlled human trials have found that aloe, either alone or in combination with the oral hypoglycemic drug, glibenclamide, effectively lowers blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Alpha Lipoic Acid Alpha lipoic acid is a powerful natural antioxidant. Preliminary and double blind trials have found that supplementing 600 to 1,200 mg of lipoic acid per day improves insulin sensitivity and the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. In a preliminary study, supplementing with 600 mg of alpha lipoic acid per day for 18 months slowed the progression of kidney damage in patients with type 2 diabetes. American Ginseng In a small pilot study, 3 grams of American ginseng was found to lower the rise in blood sugar following the consumption of a drink high in glucose by people with type 2 diabetes. Antioxidants Because oxidation damage is believed to play a role in the development of diabetic retinopathy, antioxidant nutrients might be protective. One doctor has administered a daily regimen of 500 mcg selenium, 80 Continue reading >>

Taking A Daily Vitamin To Prevent Type 1 Diabetes?

Taking A Daily Vitamin To Prevent Type 1 Diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder characterized by genetic susceptibility associated with a growing number of loci, including major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which provides a strong influence (1). While the number of susceptibility genes and loci is numerous, an even larger list of environmental agents has long been noted to influence, in either a positive or negative fashion, the risk for or progression to type 1 diabetes (2). Unfortunately, studies examining genetic and environmental influences on type 1 diabetes are remarkably complex in terms of study design, performance, and data analysis. Large study populations are also required for identifying minor influences of genetic loci or environmental agents, yet these efforts often result in the identification of candidates with relatively small odds ratios (i.e., a small influence on disease risk). In addition, type 1 diabetes is quite heterogeneous in its presentation, form, and characteristics when examined from either a metabolic or an immunologic perspective. It is also probable that some degree of complexity arises from geographical clusters wherein specific gene-environment interactions for a particular region yield different answers to the question of what causes type 1 diabetes (3). What is evident is that an increase in type 1 diabetes is occurring globally, yet, as previously emphasized, many hypotheses exist as to the cause for this observation (4). Of those thought to be environmental in nature, vitamins have gained particular attention of late, the most notable perhaps being vitamin D. This is based on epidemiologic-, therapeutic-, and genetic-based studies for this molecule in type 1 diabetes (5–7). At the same time, vitamin A, another fat-soluble vitamin with immunomodulatory effects, h Continue reading >>

Select Vitamins And Minerals In The Management Of Diabetes

Select Vitamins And Minerals In The Management Of Diabetes

In Brief The use of vitamin, mineral, and other complementary nutrition-based therapies has increased dramatically in the United States. Many health care providers are also beginning to explore the use of these therapies in their practices. For those of us who work in conventional health care settings, this is a new venture. But for many of our patients who have been self-medicating with supplements, it is not. This article reviews how micronutrient requirements are determined and summarizes current recommendations for supplementation and the most pertinent research on the use of key vitamins and minerals in diabetes management. Vitamins and minerals play diverse roles in our bodies. Initially, the nutrition community focused on the roles micronutrients play in preventing deficiency diseases such as scurvy, pellagra, and rickets. As our understanding of nutritional science grew, it became clear that nutrients act in far broader ways. We now know that micronutrients can regulate metabolism and gene expression and influence the development and progression of many chronic diseases.1 Eventually, we may be able to tailor nutritional recommendations to individuals’ unique genetic makeup, thus increasing the potential benefit and positive outcomes of medical nutrition therapy. Micronutrients are vitamins and minerals that our bodies require in small quantities for specific functions. They most commonly function as essential coenzymes and cofactors for metabolic reactions and thus help support basic cellular reactions (i.e., glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, lipid and amino acid metabolism) required to maintain energy production and life.1 Even moderate deficiencies can lead to serious disease states. Micronutrients have been investigated as potential preventive and treatmen Continue reading >>

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Three Articles On Type I Diabetes: Article #1: Introduction to Type I Diabetes (This Article) Article #2: Possible Causes of Type I Diabetes Article #3: The Treatment of Type I Diabetes Introduction to Type I Diabetes Did you know that there are two products that have cured advanced Type I diabetes cases? Both of them will be discussed in this article. But more importantly, one of these products can reverse cumulative severe side-effects of Type I or Type 2 diabetes. Type I diabetes is actually a set of symptoms, meaning it can be caused by several different things. The symptoms are that the blood lacks insulin. There are actually several things that can cause an abnormally low level of insulin in the blood. Type I diabetes is a very severe disease. The average lifespan of Type I diabetic is 5-8 years shorter than an average person. But death is not the worst thing about Type I diabetes. Here is a list of some of the health problems it can lead to: Amputation of limbs Blindness (retinopathy) – diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in America — 12,000 to 24,000 case annually Kidney failure (nephropathy) – frequently leading to dialysis or a kidney/pancreas transplant Liver disease Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) Heart disease Stroke (e.g. paralysis) High blood pressure Nerve damage (neuropathy) Dementia Urinary tract infection (mostly in women) Depression – Note: Aspartame (e.g. Equal, NutraSweet, etc.) and sugar are the leading causes of depression in non-diabetics. However, because the average diabetic consumes more aspartame than the average person, it is highly possible that aspartame is by far the REAL cause of depression in diabetics!! A diabetic should absolutely avoid aspartame and all other artificial sweeteners! Bone quali Continue reading >>

7 Essential Vitamins To Prevent Diabetes Complications

7 Essential Vitamins To Prevent Diabetes Complications

I recently carried out a survey among physicians working with diabetic patients: I wanted to know how comprehensive their treatments were. To my surprise, all of them focused treatment on strict blood glucose control using either only drug therapy or a combination of drugs and dietary changes. Unfortunately, this simplified approach not only fails to address the damage diabetes causes, but it can actually hasten the progression of diabetes. Keep reading to find out what vitamins are crucial for optimal diabetes management and why people with diabetes need them. Before I get started, please keep in mind that I am not implying you should run to the nearest health store and buy all the following vitamins. I usually advise my patients to try and get all the nutrients their body needs from REAL foods while ensuring their digestive tract is working optimally. Why do diabetic patients need more vitamins? The first reason is that diabetes is a nutritional wasting disease – when blood glucose (sugar) levels are high, they act as a diuretic. This causes excessive urination which washes out loads of nutrients including antioxidants, vitamins and minerals such as magnesium and zinc. Simply drinking more water won’t help replace the water-soluble nutrients that were lost. Another reason is glycation, a process in which glucose molecules react with proteins in the body – this damages the protein turning them into nonfunctional structures called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Unfortunately, although glycation is a key-feature of diabetes-related complications such as blindness, heart attack and nerve damage, it does not figure in conventional treatment for diabetes. You’ve probably heard of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a well-known AGE among diabetics. Well, HbA1c is Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes (holistic)

Type 1 Diabetes (holistic)

About This Condition Also known as childhood-onset diabetes, type 1 diabetes requires regular blood sugar tests and medical intervention. According to research or other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful. Fight back with fiber Under a doctor's supervision, stabilize your blood sugar by eating fiber from whole grains, beans (legumes), vegetables, and fruit, and consider using a fiber supplement such as psyllium or guar gum Go for the chromium Under the supervision of a doctor, take 200 mcg a day of this essential trace mineral to improve glucose tolerance Protect with alpha lipoic acid Protect against diabetic complications, such as nerve and kidney damage, by taking 600 to 1,200 mg of this supplement per day Copyright © 2017 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires December 2017. Continue reading >>

Best Supplements: Diabetes Reversed With This £1 A Day Natural Vitamin

Best Supplements: Diabetes Reversed With This £1 A Day Natural Vitamin

Ojamin Herb & Fruit uses 14 natural ingredients, and could reverse fatty liver diseases, which in most cases are the cause for type 2 diabetes, scientists have revealed. The findings could lead to a reversal in type 2 diabetes, the company said. The supplement, which costs £30 for a one months supply, is available as a bottled tonic, as a sachet, or as a capsule. Fatty liver diseases are found in more than 75 per cent of diabetics. The condition causes fatty deposits to build up, making the body resistant to insulin. But, Ojamin showed “promise” in preventing type 2 diabetes from developing in those with liver diseases. This is a great news for those at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and looking for an all-natural supplement to help in prevention “We are delighted with the findings, which support the legacy of personal experiences and testimonials offered by Ojamin users over many years,” said Pete Tate, founder of the supplement’s manufacturer. “This is a great news for those at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and looking for an all-natural supplement to help in prevention. “We are pursuing further clinical trials and believe this is the world’s first truly effective fully natural medicine for diabetics.” Ojamin Herb & Fruit supplements helped to restart mitochondrial function in liver disease patients, according to a study by the Innovative Concepts in Drug Development. The supplement is made up of aloe vera, basil, beleric, bitter melon, cumin, gooseberry, ball, haritaki, fenugreek, java plum, neem, okra, turmeric and watermelon seeds. All of the ingredients are sourced from India, and combined with pure spring water. Other beneficial effects of the supplement include boosting the immune system and reducing wrinkles. Ojamin is fully approv Continue reading >>

Does Low Vitamin D Increase Type 1 Diabetes Risk?

Does Low Vitamin D Increase Type 1 Diabetes Risk?

Numerous studies have found an association between low levels of vitamin D and increased risk for type 1 diabetes, but researchers are still exploring whether low vitamin D is actually a cause of the disease. A recent study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology found that young adults who have sufficient levels of vitamin D may lower their risk for developing type 1 diabetes later in life by as much as 50 percent. Though the results are still preliminary, the study offers the strongest evidence to date that vitamin D might protect against type 1 diabetes. The study compared vitamin D levels in 310 active members of the U.S. military who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes to levels in a second group of healthy controls from the same population. The researchers determined the individuals’ vitamin D status by testing frozen blood samples on file with the Department of Defense, which were taken before any of the participants were diagnosed with diabetes. "Among non-Hispanic white individuals, we found that having levels of vitamin D that were 75 nanomoles per liter (nmol/L) or greater was associated with a 50 percent reduced risk of developing type 1 diabetes," says lead author Kassandra Munger, ScD, a study research associate at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Researchers have also looked at whether vitamin D supplements early in life offer protection against diabetes at an older age. A review of five studies published in the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood found that infants who received vitamin D supplements were less likely to develop type 1 diabetes. Explaining the Diabetes and Vitamin D Connection While it has not been proved that a vitamin D deficiency can cause diabetes, there seems to be a correlation. Type 1 diabetes is an au Continue reading >>

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Question: Answer: Many different supplements may help lower or control blood sugar in people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who experience hyperglycemia (when blood glucose rises higher than normal). These supplements are discussed below. More details about each, including dosage, drug interactions, potential side effects, and ConsumerLab.com's reviews of products on the market, can be found by clicking on the links. Due to the seriousness of hyperglycemia, it is important to consult with your physician regarding use of these supplements. Cinnamon supplements may modestly improve blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not well controlled with medication. In addition, one small study found that a branded cinnamon extract reduced fasting blood sugar by an average of about 10 mg/dL in prediabetic men and women with metabolic syndrome. Keep in mind, however, that only certain varieties of cinnamon have been shown to have this effect, and long-term safety studies have not been conducted. Curcumin (from turmeric) may improve blood sugar levels, according to preliminary studies, and one study found curcumin to dramatically lower the chances of prediabetes in middle-aged, slightly overweight men and women with somewhat higher than normal blood sugar levels. Alpha lipoic acid may improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, although it may only slightly reduce levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Chromium picolinate may help some people with type 2 diabetes decrease fasting blood glucose levels as well as levels of insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). However, be aware that high doses may worsen insulin sensitivity in healthy people who are not obese or diabetic. Having adequate blood levels of vi Continue reading >>

Fat And Water Soluble Vitamins For Those With Diabetes

Fat And Water Soluble Vitamins For Those With Diabetes

Vitamins are classified as either fat or water soluble based on how they act in your body. Some vitamins are dissolved in fat while others are dissolved in water. Discover 2 fat and 2 water soluble vitamins that are beneficial for people with diabetes. Fat soluble vitamins dissolve in lipids in your body. They are absorbed by chylomicrons (fat globules) that travel through your lymphatic system to the small intestines and then get circulated in your blood. Examples of fat soluble vitamins include vitamins A. D, E and K. Ultimately these vitamins, especially A and E, are stored in your body tissue. People can get too much of a good thing when it comes to certain fat soluble vitamins. This can lead to a potentially harmful condition called hypervitaminosis. However, those who are deficient in fat soluble vitamins might have a fat intake that is too low or their fat absorption is compromised by certain drugs or health conditions. It is best to consult with your doctor and inquire about blood testing to determine your vitamin levels. Water soluble vitamins include vitamins B and C. These vitamins dissolve in water. Often people with diabetes type 2 are deficient in water soluble vitamins and minerals because elevated blood sugar levels act like a diuretic. As a result, nutrients can be lost in your urine. This may lead to nutritional deficiencies and related health complications. Talk to your doctor about taking vitamin supplements. Certain nutritional supplements can help your body use insulin and even maintain healthier blood sugar levels. Taking a vitamin supplement can also help boost your immune system and make you less susceptible to illnesses such as the common cold. B-complex vitamins are a water soluble supplement your doctor may recommend. People on Metformin- a c Continue reading >>

Feeling Fatigued Or Irritable? There's A 1 In 4 Chance You Suffer From Diabetes...

Feeling Fatigued Or Irritable? There's A 1 In 4 Chance You Suffer From Diabetes...

Type 2 diabetes, which involves loss of insulin and leptin sensitivity, is easily preventable, and nearly 100 percent reversible without drugs. About eight percent of the US population have type 2 diabetes, and nearly 26 percent of U.S. adults over the age of 20 and more than 35 percent of seniors are pre-diabetic (insulin-resistant) Type 1 diabetes, also called insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile-onset diabetes, involves lack of insulin and is relatively uncommon One of the driving forces behind obesity and type 2 diabetes is excessive dietary fructose, which has adverse metabolic effects on your leptin, insulin, triglycerides, and ghrelin (the “hunger hormone”) Diabetes drugs fail to address the underlying problem, and many, like Avandia, can have dangerous side effects. Avandia is linked to 43 percent increased risk of heart attack and 64 percent higher risk of cardiovascular death, compared with other treatments Important lifestyle factors to help prevent insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes include exercise, avoiding fructose, and optimizing your vitamin D levels and gut flora By Dr. Mercola Much of what you have probably heard about diabetes from your health care provider may be incorrect. There is an enormous amount of misinformation circulating from seemingly knowledgeable sources about this epidemic disease. The vast majority of diabetics are clueless about how to reverse it, and many don't even realize that they can. They believe their fate has been sealed and all they can do now is "control" it. More than 50 percent of type 2 diabetics are also not even aware they have diabetes. Diabetes rates for both adults and children are climbing out of control and one in four Americans either have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Unfortunately, by following convention Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 1

Diabetes, Type 1

What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that accounts for five to 10 percent of all cases of diabetes. It initially develops most often in children and young adults. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin, the hormone needed to transport glucose into cells where it can be converted into energy. For this reason, if you have type 1 diabetes you will need to take insulin daily throughout your life. This form of diabetes has also been called juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes. What are the symptoms? Some of the symptoms of diabetes, such as persistent thirst or irritability, can seem relatively benign, which is one of the reasons why diagnosis may be delayed. With type 1 diabetes, however, symptoms may come on suddenly. Early detection and treatment can decrease the odds of developing the acute complications that can stem from type 1 diabetes. Common symptoms of diabetes include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought quickly under control via treatment, acute complications of type 1 diabetes include severe dehydration and development of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a metabolic state characterized by high concentrations of ketone bodies, which are byproducts of fatty acid breakdown, and can render the body’s tissues dangerously acidic. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, which in turn can lead to shock, coma, and even death. Longer term complications of type 1 diabetes – which are also common to those with type 2 diabetes – include: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure w Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

Herbs, Vitamins, And More For Diabetes

Herbs, Vitamins, And More For Diabetes

Alternative or complementary treatments spark the interest of many people with diabetes. The prospect of having better control over blood sugar levels or being less dependent on insulin injections by taking herbal supplements or vitamins is certainly attractive. But do any of the things often touted as alternative diabetes treatments really work? First, anyone interested in going down this road should consider the difference between the terms "alternative" and "complementary." When it comes to managing diabetes, the latter is the term experts prefer. "Alternative" implies that you ditch one treatment in favor of another. Rather, if you want to look into taking supplements, you should do so as a possible complement to the treatment program your doctor has prescribed. Many herbs and vitamins have shown some promise for diabetes, but the scientific evidence for their safety and efficacy is too uncertain for experts to make recommendations about most of them. That doesn't mean that doctors are closed-minded about the possibilities. "It's not as if we know everything we need to know," says Nathaniel Clark, MD, spokesman for the American Diabetes Association. "There's always a need for new therapies and new approaches." Testimonials to the medicinal powers of various herbs -- not only in advertising, but also in millennia-old traditions of Eastern medicine -- are as abundant as the flora themselves. But modern medicine demands proof, and as herbal medicine gains popularity, scientists are busy testing the possible benefits of herbs for treating many diseases. Diabetes is no exception. A recent study found that cinnamon can increase metabolism of blood glucose by triggering insulin release. In that study, as little as one-quarter teaspoon a day produced significant reductions Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

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