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Best Total Body Exercise For Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Diabetes has become a widespread epidemic, primarily because of the increasing prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2007, almost 24 million Americans had diabetes, with one-quarter of those, or six million, undiagnosed (261). Currently, it is estimated that almost 60 million U.S. residents also have prediabetes, a condition in which blood glucose (BG) levels are above normal, thus greatly increasing their risk for type 2 diabetes (261). Lifetime risk estimates suggest that one in three Americans born in 2000 or later will develop diabetes, but in high-risk ethnic populations, closer to 50% may develop it (200). Type 2 diabetes is a significant cause of premature mortality and morbidity related to cardiovascular disease (CVD), blindness, kidney and nerve disease, and amputation (261). Although regular physical activity (PA) may prevent or delay diabetes and its complications (10,46,89,112,176,208,259,294), most people with type 2 diabetes are not active (193). In this article, the broader term “physical activity” (defined as “bodily movement produced by the contraction of skeletal muscle that substantially increases energy expenditure”) is used interchangeably with “exercise,” which is defined as “a subset of PA done with the intention of developing physical fitness (i.e., cardiovascular [CV], strength, and flexibility training).” The intent is to recognize that many types of physical movement may have a positive effect on physical fitness, morbidity, and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diagnosis, classification, and etiology of diabetes Currently, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the use of any of the following four criteria for di Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms - Best Exercise For Managing Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms - Best Exercise For Managing Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes type 2 symptoms - what's the best exercise for managing blood sugar levels? Aerobic exercise can help your body use insulin better Spread your activity out over at least three days during the week and try not to go more than two days in a row without exercising. Moderate intensity means that you are working hard enough that you can talk, but not sing, during the activity. Vigorous intensity means you cannot say more than a few words without pausing for a breath during the activity. Brisk walking (outside or inside on a treadmill) Cycling - outdoors and stationary indoors Diabetes type 2 symptoms - stair climbing can help you control blood sugar levels The other type of exercise American Diabetes Association recommends is strength training. Strength training can make your body more sensitive to insulin and can lower blood glucose. The organisation recommends: Doing some type of strength training at least two times per week in addition to aerobic activity. Examples of strength training activities include: Weight machines or free weights at the gym Lifting light weights or objects like canned good or water bottles at home Calisthenics or exercises that use tour own body weight to work your muscles (examples are pushups, sit ups, squats, lunges, wall-sits and planks) Other activities that build and keep muscle like heavy gardening Diabetes type 2 symptoms - tennis can also help control blood sugar levels The main goal if you have type 2 diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled, and incorporating certain foods in your diet can help. Eating eggs daily can have a positive impact on blood sugar levels. But how many should you consume in a day? Eggs provide a host of health benefits - as well as helping reduce heart disease, eggs have been found to decrea Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

Best Total Body Exercise For Type 2 Diabetes: Glucosezone

Best Total Body Exercise For Type 2 Diabetes: Glucosezone

BEST TOTAL BODY EXERCISE FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES: GLUCOSEZONE Uploaded by GLUCOSEZONE FOR MORE VISIT No high impact activities, no weights, just the best exercise for increasing insulin sensitivity and lowering glucose levels. Every GLUCOSEZONE exercise video contains information you need to manage your diabetes during and after exercise. We collaborate with a number of Diabetes organizations and personalities across the country, and have helped thousands of people living with Diabetes improve their diabetes conditions and have success with exercise by offering solutions for safe exercise with diabetes as the foundation of our programming. We are a company dedicated to helping people living with diabetes reach their fitness goals using exercise, education, and technology. GLUCOSEZONE PROGRAM: FACEBOOK: INSTAGRAM: #diabetesworkout #diabetesexercise #glucosezone #diabetes #diabetescure #fitness #exercise #workout #workoutvideo #type1diabetes #type2diabetes #bloodsugar #glucose #bloodglucose #diabetestreatmentShow more Sitting alone and getting bored! The best way to escape the situation is to grab your mobile and go for the Social Media life. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc. they will never let you be bored. The entertainment through the internet has been trendy since social media has developed .the priories of people have been changed, all though social media was created to have an active social gathering. But the results are getting the up-expected opposite. It has been noticed the flavors of relations are getting dull. Especially the young generation, they have used the social media in the way that the concept of socialism has been totally changed. The value of time with family is the most important; this is the main reason that we are facing many family issues. Somewhere Continue reading >>

6 Moves For A Total Body Workout

6 Moves For A Total Body Workout

Energize a tired exercise routine with high-intensity training A key element of an effective exercise program is variety: It can help hold your interest and make sure your muscles arent bored. One way to accomplish this is with circuit and interval training. Many people use these terms interchangeably but they are distinct. Circuit training is a variety of strength exercises performed at high intensities in rotation with minimal rest, often using exercise equipment to target specific body parts. Interval training alternates short, high-intensity bouts of exercise (or intervals) with lower-intensity exercise or rest periods. Jog-walk intervals, for instance, may include jogging for 60 seconds and then walking for 30 seconds for two to 10 cycles. Interval training is not designed only for aerobic or cardiovascular exercise; it can also be done with strength training. Recently, the buzzword in the fitness industry has been high-intensity training (HIT). It involves performing high-quality, intense strength-training exercises to the point of momentary muscle fatigue. Arthur Jones, the founder of Nautilus, introduced high-intensity training in the 1970s. You may be thinking, I cant exercise at a high intensity! But intensity is relative to your exertion level and abilities. The key is to perform each exercise with correct form and techniquefaster is not better!for a full cycle of moves. Once you work up to it, repeat each exercise until you cant perform another repetition while maintaining good form. MYTH: All exercises are good for high-intensity training. Fact: HIT works best with total-body exercises that also challenge your cardiovascular system and core stability muscles. Squats, lunges, and plank poses are suitable for HIT; bicep curls are not. MYTH: High-intensity tr Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise: Exercise Makes It Easier To Control Your Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise: Exercise Makes It Easier To Control Your Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes and Exercise: Exercise Makes It Easier to Control Your Diabetes When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. Its also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin , if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, youll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range.Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications , such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level.People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesnt produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesnt use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucosewithoutinsulin when youre exercising.In other words, it doesnt matter if youre insulin resistant or if you dont have enough insulin:when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If youre insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective.That isyour insulin resistance goesdownwhen you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems.People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack.Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong.Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesteroland that helps you avoid ar Continue reading >>

Alternative Therapeutic Method For Type Two Diabetes: Whole Body Vibration Therapy: A Mini-review

Alternative Therapeutic Method For Type Two Diabetes: Whole Body Vibration Therapy: A Mini-review

Alternative Therapeutic Method for Type Two Diabetes: Whole Body Vibration Therapy: A Mini-Review Erika L Simmerman1, Xu Qin1,2, Henrik O Berdel1,3, Mahmood S Mozaffari1, Babak Baban1, Jack CYu1,4 1Department of Oral Biology, Georgia Regents University, Building CL2140, 1120 15th St, Augusta, GA, USA 2Tongue Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Department of Stomatology, Wuhan, Hubei, China 3Palmeto Health/University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA 4Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Georgia Regents University, Building HB-5040, 1120 15th, Augusta, GA, USA Building CL2140, 1120 15th St, Augusta, GA, USA Received November 14th, 2015 - Accepted January 6th, 2016 Visit for more related articles at JOP. Journal of the Pancreas Context As the prevalence of obesity and diabetes continues to increase there is a need for new interventions to control this epidemic. Multiple alternative treatment methods exist for type 2 diabetes mellitus such as acupuncture, bariatric surgery, yoga, aromatherapy, herbal remedies, etc. Whole Body Vibration is a relatively new area of interest recently utilized as an adjunctive therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus, representing a potentially new and novel treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Objective The primary objective of this study was to summarize current literature regarding the effects of whole body vibration on type 2 diabetes mellitus . This review details the effect of whole body vibration on areas of high clinical impact in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus such as glycemic control, body composition, renal function, inflammatory indices, peripheral neuropathy, and wound healing. Methods Reviewers independently screened abstracts and full tex Continue reading >>

(pdf) Different Types Of Resistance Training In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Effects On Glycaemic Control, Muscle Mass And Strength

(pdf) Different Types Of Resistance Training In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Effects On Glycaemic Control, Muscle Mass And Strength

Background: Resistance training has become a mainstay of exercise training in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, it remains controversial whether hypertrophy resistance training (HRT) is superior to endurance resistance training (ERT) with regard to its effects on glycaemic control, muscle mass and strength. Methods: Thirty-two patients with T2DM (13 men and 19 women; 64.8 7.8 years) were randomly assigned to either eight weeks of HRT (n 16; 2 sets, 1012 repetitions, 70% of the one-repetition maximum (1-RM)) or ERT (n 16; 2 sets, 2530 repetitions, 40% 1-RM). In addition, all patients participated in aerobic exercise training (AET; 1 hour/day on 2 non-consecutive days/week; cycle ergometer; 70% of heart rate reserve). Results: After eight weeks of intervention, there were time but not group effects for reduced glucose and fructosamine levels, weight, BMI, waist circumference, subcutaneous abdominal fat, resting heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure; muscle mass of the arms and physical exercise capacity increased significantly. Significant time and group effects were documented for maximum strength of the chest, with a greater increase for HRT than ERT (p0.01). Conclusions: Specific maximal resistance training of the chest muscles led to superior gain in strength as compared to endurance resistance training. This, however, did not translate into superior values of glycaemic control, weight, waist circumference, muscle mass and physical work capacity, which all improved significantly by a similar magnitude in both groups. Since overall effects of both protocols were comparable, both may be offered to patients according to their Type 2 diabetes mellitus, resistance training, glycaemic control, upper body strength, physical work capacity Received 4 March Continue reading >>

Exercise Resources - Diabetes Education Services

Exercise Resources - Diabetes Education Services

Physical Activity Guidelines 2016 Position Statement from the American Diabetes Association Resistance Training with Free Weights Patient Handout Excellent resource that uses images and words to describe how to use free weights and exercise all major muscle groups. A publication of the Canadian Diabetes Association. Resistance Training Using Bands Patient Handout Demonstrates through pictures and descriptions how to work all major muscle groups using bands and resistance training. Published by the Canadian Diabetes Association. Diabetes Video of Flash Mob to Beat It by Michael Jackson . Get Ready for World Diabetes Day, Nov 14. Its easy and fun! Teach your colleagues, get your patients up and moving. Lets Beat Diabetes together Step-by-Step Instructions click here Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes American College of Sports Medicine /American Diabetes Association joint position statement on exercise and type 2 diabetes. Weight Watchers 10-minute time crunch training with resistance bands DVD (Weight Watchers store, Online) Sit and Be Fit Mary Ann Wilson, RN, demonstrates how to effectively exercise while sitting down through videos, You-tube an her TV show. Go 4 Life a NIH website that celebrates active aging through exercise. Darebee.com fitness-at-home website that contains training challenges at a more advanced level. Diabetes Breakthrough by Osama Hammy M.D., Ph.D. and Sheri Colberg Ph.D.(book) Local YMCA (resistance training classes: offered only in some locations) Continue reading >>

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

15 Exercise Tips For People With Type 2 Diabetes

15 Exercise Tips for People With Type 2 Diabetes 15 Exercise Tips for People With Type 2 Diabetes These tips will help you ease back into exercise and find a workout plan that works for you. Exercise is safeand highly recommendedfor most people with type 2 diabetes , including those with complications. Along with diet and medication , exercise will help you lower blood sugar and lose weight. However, the prospect of diving into a workout routine may be intimidating. If you're like many newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics, you may not have exercised in years. If that's the case, don't worry: It's fine to start slow and work up. These tips will help you ease back into exercise and find a workout plan that works for you. As long as you're totaling 30 minutes of exercise each day , several brief workouts are fine, says George Griffing, MD, professor of endocrinology at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "We need people with diabetes up and moving," Dr. Griffing says. "If you can do your exercise in one 30 minute stretch, fine. But if not, break it up into increments you can manage that add up to at least 30 minutes each day." Increase activity in generalsuch as walking or climbing stairsrather than a particular type of exercise. However, don't rely on housework or other daily activity as your sole exercise. Too often, people overestimate the amount of exercise they get and underestimate the amount of calories they consume. (A step-counting pedometer can help.) Stanford University researchers conducted a review of 26 studies looking at the use of pedometers as motivation for physical activity. Published in 2007, the review found that people who used a pedometer increased their activity by 27%. Having a goal of 10,000 steps a day (about five miles) was Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

Physical Activity/exercise And Type 2 Diabetes

A consensus statement from the American Diabetes Association For decades, exercise has been considered a cornerstone of diabetes management, along with diet and medication. However, high-quality evidence on the importance of exercise and fitness in diabetes was lacking until recent years. The present document summarizes the most clinically relevant recent advances related to people with type 2 diabetes and the recommendations that follow from these. Our recently published technical review on physical activity/exercise and type 2 diabetes (1) includes greater detail on individual studies, on prevention of diabetes, and on the physiology of exercise. The present statement focuses on type 2 diabetes. Issues primarily germane to type 1 diabetes will be covered in a subsequent technical review and ADA Statement. The levels of evidence used are defined by the ADA in ref. 2. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND PREVENTION OF TYPE 2 DIABETES Two randomized trials each found that lifestyle interventions including ∼150 min/week of physical activity and diet-induced weight loss of 5–7% reduced the risk of progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes by 58% (3,4). A cluster-randomized trial found that diet alone, exercise alone, and combined diet and exercise were equally effective in reducting the progression from IGT to diabetes (5). Therefore, there is firm and consistent evidence that programs of increased physical activity and modest weight loss reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes in individuals with IGT. EFFECTS OF STRUCTURED EXERCISE INTERVENTIONS ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND BODY WEIGHT IN TYPE 2 DIABETES Boulé et al. (6) undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effects of structured exercise interventions in clinical trials of ≥8 weeks duration Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

First things first. Exercise is something EVERYBODY should be doing! In the same way that a person shouldn’t only eat a healthy diet when they have diabetes, a person shouldn’t only exercise if they are trying to lose weight or have chronic disease. Just as a home, a car, or any other machine requires regular maintenance to function optimally, the human body requires activity to keeps its muscles, organs, and bones strong and healthy. That's why we are going to cover type 2 diabetes and exercise and why it's so important to get yourself in a routine. You'll be happy to know from now on in, Fridays on the DMP Blog will now be dedicated to “Fitness Friday's.” We want to help educate you about all the different types of workouts you can do and perhaps provide some weekly motivation too. Benefits of Exercise Helps with weight loss (and maintenance) Improves mood and self-esteem Counters depression and anxiety Increases energy levels Controls appetite Makes it easier to do basic activities (ie. climbing stairs, carrying groceries, playing with kids…) Reduces stress Improves sleep Reduces body fat Strengthens muscles (including the heart), lungs and bones Reduces risk for injury (including back pain) Lowers risk for disease (heart disease) AND improves blood glucose control by making the body more sensitive to insulin This last point may be most relevant with diabetes and even pre-diabetes. If you picture insulin as the key that unlocks the cell door to let glucose in, picture exercise as grease in the keyhole and hinges–getting that door ready and willing to open up, easily allowing glucose to be taken into the cells and reducing sugar in the blood. Exercise helps insulin do it's job better, lower and keeping blood sugar levels more stable. How Much Exercise? For Continue reading >>

Glucosezone: An Exercise App For People With Diabetes

Glucosezone: An Exercise App For People With Diabetes

GlucoseZone: An Exercise App for People with Diabetes An app uses blood sugar readings and other diabetes information to provide personalized guidance to workouts, along with exercise videos specifically for people with diabetes People with diabetes are often told to exercise, but arent given much guidance on how exercise might impact their diabetes and how to fit it into it into their lives in safe, effective, and manageable ways. GlucoseZone aims to close that gap with exercise videos created specifically for people with diabetes. For convenience, GlucoseZone is available for Apple or Android smartphones and the videos are also on YouTube . Exercise can get complicated for people with diabetes when considering factors like blood sugar levels, the possibility of hypoglycemia, type and dose of drugs taken, and even the type of exercise. For instance, weightlifting and other intense exercise can increase blood sugar levels during and right after exercise, while endurance exercise usually has a glucose-lowering effect. GlucoseZone takes a data-driven approach to address the complexity of exercising with diabetes, based on published research and information collected through in-person exercise sessions with people with diabetes. The app provides exercise guidance that takes the factors mentioned above, like blood sugar levels, medications, and exercise type, into consideration. Early studies show that GlucoseZone can help people meet their goals. In a small pilot study , 12 people with type 2 diabetes who were struggling with diabetes management and exercise completed the 90-day GlucoseZone NOW program, resulting in: Some participants were able to reduce medications GlucoseZone began in-person in a specialized fitness center in Connecticut with one-on-one workout sessions Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise: Can A Short, Daily Workout Make A Difference?

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise: Can A Short, Daily Workout Make A Difference?

The scientifically-proven 7-minute workout has been shown to have impressive benefits but can it be helpful for people with type 2 diabetes? Thinking about trying the popular 7-minute workout? This series of high-intensity exercises performed in succession with short periods of rest in between has been shown to produce impressive benefits when performed 6 days per week. These benefits include reduced body mass index (BMI), improved oxygen uptake, smaller hip and waist circumference and improved sensitivity to insulin. 1 The workout includes 9 to 12 exercises that use the body’s big muscles at a high-intensity pace. Exercises are done at the rate of 15 to 20 repetitions per 30-second interval, with a rest period of fewer than 15 seconds between exercises to maximize metabolic impact. Below, personal trainer Katie Teasdale (who also has type 1 diabetes) demonstrates how to complete each exercise within the 7-minute workout whilst maintaining proper form and technique: Research has shown that even a very short workout can achieve a reduction in waist circumference and can be a “great solution for people to get started and plan on continuing exercising.”2 All of which sounds great but what about people with type 2 diabetes? While physical exercise is vital in the prevention and management of diabetes3, the intensity of the workout may initially prove daunting for some. What's more, people with type 2 diabetes may need longer resistance and additional aerobic training than can be achieved from a 7-minute session, says Nicholas Beltz, PhD, assistant professor of sports physiology at the University of Wisconsin. Overall, however, the workout gets a green light from Beltz. “If we’re talking about reductions in waist and hip circumference, theoretically we’re talking Continue reading >>

The How, What, And Why Of Exercise And Type-2 Diabetes

The How, What, And Why Of Exercise And Type-2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a common problem among the American population and worldwide. Aside from the impacted life span and quality of life, diabetes is associated with an increased burden on society in relation to medical costs which has a great economic impact. The most influential factors that have been found to be related to diabetes include genetic factors and environmental influences. While you may not be able to change your genetics you can make a change on environmental risk factors. Risk factors Obesity and inactivity are two of the main risk factors of acquiring diabetes. Environmental factors may be mostly modifiable which means that many people that acquire diabetes may have been able to avoid this condition and may also be able to reverse this condition with lifestyle changes. Diet is a crucial aspect of the overall management of diabetes as well as exercise and physical activity. Type 1 versus Type 2 Type 2-diabetes can be difficult to treat and can be expensive to manage and that is why avoiding this diagnosis is imperative. Diabetes occurs because the body does not produce or does not properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is produced by the pancreases that allows glucose or sugar to enter the cells. If the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin or when muscle, fat, and liver cells do not properly respond to the insulin that is there then glucose builds up in the blood which can become toxic. Hyperglycemia is a condition that occurs when there is too much glucose in the blood. Type 1-diabetes is not related to diet and inactivity but is the type of diabetes that occurs in children and young adults and is the result of the immune system destroying the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. This article will focus now on how to reduce the risk of type Continue reading >>

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