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Best Tea For Diabetes

Best Healing Tea For Diabetes

Best Healing Tea For Diabetes

Best Healing Tea For Diabetes If you have prediabetes or diabetes, have yourself another cuppa. Of black tea, that is. Drinking the healing brew, which in the past has been linked to health bennies including reduced stroke risk, reduced blood pressure, and reduced production of the stress hormone cortisol, was recently associated with diabetes prevention in a new British Medical Journal (BMJ) study. When researchers compared consumption of fermented black tea in 50 countries across all continents, they found that countries guzzling the most black tea had lower rates of Type 2 diabetes than countries that drank the least black tea. A snatch of complex flavonoids are released in the brewing process that turns green tea into black. These flavonoids that develop during the oxidation process (including thearubigins and theaflavins) differ from the flavonoids found in green tea (simple catechins). It is believed that flavonoids may replenish the beta cells in the pancreas that Type 2 diabetes can wipe out. The current finding supports prior studies, including a 2008 Scottish study in the journal Aging Cell, which concluded that black tea may help fight Type 2 diabetes. Still, because research findings overall have been mixed, and other research has not found flavonoids to guard against insulin resistance and diabetes, more research is needed. Researchers’ analysis in this latest study showed a mathematical link between black tea and rates of Type 2 diabetes but not a cause-effect relationship. Among the 50 countries analyzed, the top three in terms of black tea consumption were Ireland, where people down some 4.4 pounds yearly, the UK, and Turkey. Countries drinking the least black tea included Brazil, China, Mexico, Morocco, and South Korea. In Western countries, 90 percen Continue reading >>

Can Coffee Or Tea Extend Survival With Diabetes?

Can Coffee Or Tea Extend Survival With Diabetes?

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnosis of diabetes comes with a long list of "don'ts." But new research suggests that coffee and tea probably shouldn't be off-limits because each may help prevent an early death. Well, at least if you're a woman with diabetes, that is. Men with diabetes didn't seem to reap the rewards of consuming caffeine in the new study. The research found that women with diabetes who had up to one regular cup of coffee a day (100 milligrams of caffeine) were 51 percent less likely to die than women who consumed no caffeine during the 11-year study. "As caffeine is consumed by more than 80 percent of the world's adult population, it is essential to understand the impact of this factor concerning cardiovascular, cancer and all-cause mortality," said study researcher Dr. Joao Sergio Neves, an endocrinology resident at Sao Joao Hospital Center in Porto, Portugal. "Our study showed a significant inverse association between caffeine consumption and death from all causes in women with diabetes," said Neves. "These results suggest that advising women with diabetes to drink more caffeine may reduce their mortality. This would represent a simple, clinically beneficial, and inexpensive option in women with diabetes," Neves said. But he also pointed out that this observational study cannot prove a direct cause-and-effect link; it only found an association between caffeine consumption and the risk of dying. "Further studies, ideally randomized clinical trials, are needed to confirm this benefit," Neves said. The study authors reviewed information collected in a U.S. study that included more than 3,000 people with diabetes -- both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The data was collected between 1999 and 2010. Besides gathering genera Continue reading >>

Herbal Tea For Diabetes

Herbal Tea For Diabetes

There's nothing quite like sitting down to a cup of hot herbal tea to calm the nerves and soothe the belly. But more than that, the many health benefits herbal tea provides is one very compelling reason you should include herbal tea in your everyday diabetes routine! It’s no accident that herbal tea beverages can make us feel so good. Steeping medicinal infusions is one of the oldest practiced medicines in existence. It hails from Ancient Egypt to Ancient China to many other parts of the globe. And once you learn about the benefits they can bring, you'll be using them more than ever! What is Herbal Tea? Unlike black and green tea, herbal tea is not derived from the Camellia sinensis plant. For this reason, it does not contain caffeine (in most cases) and is not technically considered tea; it’s more of an infusion or blend. Still, most people obviously just call them herbal teas! And of course, just like black tea or green tea (which we have discussed the benefits of previously), herbal tea is made by steeping a tea bag or dried tea “leaves” (which can actually come from dried leaves, flowers, or roots of the plant) in boiling water. Sarah Outlaw, Clinical Herbalist, informs us that while herbal remedies are more potent in tinctures and powder form (often found in supplements), if you use loose herbs in teas in larger quantities and steep them longer, you can also enjoy their incredible medicinal benefits. Common varieties of herbal teas include chamomile, hibiscus, peppermint, rooibos, and maté. But there are so many types out there that it would be extremely difficult to try them all (or include them in this article!). Herbal Tea Nutrition Facts Most herbal teas do not contain any fats, protein, or fiber. Most varieties also contain zero carbohydrates. Though Continue reading >>

Two Herbal Teas That Can Help Lower Blood Sugar

Two Herbal Teas That Can Help Lower Blood Sugar

And they taste pretty good too! In an age of pharmaceuticals we tend to forget that there are things like herbal teas that can help improve our diabetes. Herbal teas are gaining popularity in the United States and this could be due to the infusion of Western and Eastern Medicine techniques being blended together more often. So what type of herbs are in herbal teas for diabetes control? There are a few but I’m going to give you the two most popularly utilized herbal teas for diabetes control. Bilberry Tea – Never heard of it? Well maybe you know the Bilberry by it’s more popular American name of the Huckleberry. Bilberry herbal tea is known as the most effective herbal tea in aiding diabetes for those who are not insulin dependent. So mainly we’re talking about those with type 2 diabetes benefiting from Bilberry tea. The reason why Bilberry tea is so effective in lowering blood sugar levels is because it contains something called glucoquinine which is a compound known for it’s ability to lower blood glucose levels. Another reason why Bilberry tea is such a good herbal tea for those with type 2 diabetes is because Bilberry is often used to treat eye issues such as diabetic neuropathy. Sage Tea – There are many medicinal uses for Sage tea and one of them happens to be it’s positive effect on how your body uses insulin. Studies have shown that Sage has the ability to boost insulin activity in diabetics. Those with type 2 diabetes found Sage to be the most effective. Along with being an effective aid in Diabetes control, Sage tea is also known for it’s positive effect on liver function. A liver that is not functioning at it’s best can lead to headaches, fatigue, and reduced immunity. So Sage’s positive effect on the liver is one of it’s greatest medicin Continue reading >>

10 Best Tea For Diabetics

10 Best Tea For Diabetics

Diabetes is one of the major diseases that engulf the population of the world. Nearly 50% of the world population is either affected by it or is on the radar list of ones that are likely to get affected. But do you know that herbal teas are good for diabetics? Well, lets find out how in this article today. Here are some more tips to cure diabeties Diabetes is often called as a silent killer for the same reasons. It quietly makes its hold in a person’s life and after being affected he is unable to lead a normal life post attack. There are known medical treatments for diabetes which control it. However, there is no known cure in the field of medical sciences that cures it completely. Tea Benefits For Skin Care One of the best treatments for the prevention and cure for diabetes is through herbal products. However, it is very important that you consult the doctor before consuming the herbs as they too have some medicated values which might interfere with your ongoing health treatments. Some of the teas good for diabetes are: Continue reading >>

Green Tea For Diabetes

Green Tea For Diabetes

Did you know that green tea can actually benefit people with both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes, as well as assist people who are actively workingto prevent the onset of Type 2 Diabetes? This is due to the unique antioxidants contained in the green tea leaves, and the effect that these antioxidants have on our bodies. Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too high. Blood glucose levels are normally regulated by the hormone insulin, which is made by the pancreas. In people with diabetes, the pancreas doesnt produce enough insulin or there is a problem with how the bodys cells respond to it. ( * ) THERE ARE TWO MAIN TYPES OF DIABETES: TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 Type 1 Diabetes is wherethe pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, stops making insulin, and this type of diabetes is not preventable. (Diabetes Australia ) Unless treated with daily injections of insulin, people with type 1 diabetes accumulate dangerous chemical substances in their blood from the burning of fat. This can cause a condition known as ketoacidosis . This condition is potentially life threatening if not treated. Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 85-90% of all people with diabetes. Type 2 diabetes results from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Although there is a strong genetic predisposition, the risk is greatly increased when associated with lifestyle factors such as high blood pressure, overweight or obesity, insufficient physical activity, poor diet and the classic apple shape body where extra weight is carried around the waist. (Diabetes Australia) Diabetes is an epidemic affecting over1 million Australians. Every day, 280 people are being diagnosed with this disease. ( ** ) Epidemiological studies suggest th Continue reading >>

Can Tea Help With Diabetes? Is It Beneficial?

Can Tea Help With Diabetes? Is It Beneficial?

When living with diabetes, every food and drink choice becomes a conversation. Deciding what you put in your body can be a daunting task when the consequences of choosing poorly are more extreme than what a person living without diabetes might face. It’s also true that food and drink choices can be some of the simplest, and most empowering, ways for people living with diabetes to manage their condition and its symptoms. There has been some evidence in recent years that drinking certain teas, in certain quantities, can have a beneficial effect on your health whether you have diabetes or not. For those living with diabetes, tea actually has the potential to do a lot of good. Depending on what type you drink, tea can chemically assist your body with processing and managing sugar and insulin levels, and can also help people manage some of the symptoms of diabetes, including circulation problems, energy levels, blood pressure and more. A Little Background on Tea Tea is a hot or cold beverage consumed by billions of people across the globe daily, with 3 billion tons of tea produced every year for human consumption. There are many varieties of tea; green, white, black, oolong, rooibos, herbal… the list can be long and a bit intimidating, especially when you take into account that many “teas” don’t actually contain the leaves of the tea plant, or camellia sinensis, which is an evergreen shrub native to Asia. Rooibos is made from a bush native to Southern Africa. Herbal teas can contain flowers, leaves, or other parts of a number of different plant varieties, and all of these plants can and do have a different effect on your body. Given that so many people drink tea of one sort or another on such a regular basis, science has been studying the effect that tea and it’s Continue reading >>

Is It Ok For Diabetics To Drink Green Tea?

Is It Ok For Diabetics To Drink Green Tea?

Green tea may provide a number of health benefits, such as lowering your risk for cancer, high cholesterol and Parkinson's disease, according to MedlinePlus. Although research is still in the preliminary stages, green tea may also help reduce your risk for developing diabetes and the complications sometimes associated with this condition. It may also make it easier to control your blood sugar levels. Diabetics can safely drink green tea, but they should carefully monitor their blood sugar levels because of the potential blood sugar-lowering effect of green tea. Video of the Day A study using mice published in the "British Journal of Nutrition" in April 2011 found that an antioxidant found in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate, or ECGC, may help delay the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Other animal studies have shown that green tea may help regulate blood glucose levels and help slow the progression of this condition once you have it, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Further studies would be needed to verify that these benefits occur in people as well as animals. Green Tea and Type 2 Diabetes Drinking caffeinated green tea may help lower your risk for Type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in "Annals of Internal Medicine" in 2006. Study participants who drank at least 6 cups of green tea per day had a 33 percent lower risk for Type 2 diabetes than participants who drank 1 cup or less per week. Drinking at least 3 cups of coffee per day had a similar effect, but drinking black or oolong tea didn't decrease diabetes risk. Once a person has diabetes, however, it may be best to drink less green tea; a preliminary study using animals published in "BioFactors" in 2007 found that high doses of green tea may increase blood sugar in diabetics, co Continue reading >>

Best Tea For Diabetes

Best Tea For Diabetes

When it comes to diabetes, a suitable food list is key. However, what's too often ignored or forgotten are beverages. Drinks you consume also can have a significant effect on weight and glucose levels in blood, and should be part of a food for diabetics diet plan. Pure tea is among the beverages that can be considered besides water, coffee, diet soda and other low calorie drinks. So what is the best tea for diabetes? Unsweetened tea for diabetes Before we dive in what teas are the best, we first would like to say that any tea that is sweetened by you or the manufacturer isn't a healthy choice. Be aware that not only you can control the sugar level in your drinks. Sometimes, blended teas and flavored tea bags can have added sugars when they are processed by the manufacturer. To be on the safe side, it's wise to read the details on the packaging. Always make sure you're buying pure tea. Why tea is good for diabetes? Tea is an ideal drink for diabetics because it supports your body to metabolize sugar. The key substance behind it are polyphenols found in the Camellia Sinenses tea plant. It reduce stress, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels, which are regularly higher for diabetics. Best tea for diabetes: green tea and white tea Given that polyphenols in tea are beneficial to prevent and reduce symptoms of diabetes, green and white tea will be the best options. Unlike fully oxidized black tea, these teas are less processed, and therefore preserve more polyphenols. However, given personal circumstances those teas might not be the best options. The 'rawness' of green and white tea can sometimes be harsh on the stomach. If your stomach doesn't react well or if you feel nauseous, it's better to go for more oxidized teas such as oolong, black or ripe pu erh tea. Aged white te Continue reading >>

Black Tea, Green Tea Good For Diabetes

Black Tea, Green Tea Good For Diabetes

Both black tea and green tea are good for diabetes, a rat study shows. They also prevent diabetic animals from developing cataracts. The findings appear in the May 4 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. "Black and green tea represent a potentially inexpensive, nontoxic, and, in fact, pleasurable [blood-sugar-lowering] agent," the researchers write. "Tea may be a simple, inexpensive means of preventing or retarding human diabetes and the ensuing complications." In the study, the researchers gave green and black teas to diabetic rats for three months. They found both kinds of tea inhibited diabetic cataracts. The teas also had a blood-sugar-lowering effect. To get the same dose of tea given to the rats, a 143-pound person would have to drink 4.5 8-ounce cups of tea every day. The researchers recommend that tea -- black and green -- should be studied for an antidiabetes effect in humans. Continue reading >>

Coffee Vs. Tea

Coffee Vs. Tea

By now, most people with diabetes are used to hearing about studies that show benefits from certain foods, such as the apparent blood-glucose-lowering effects of vinegar and cinnamon. Sometimes, these studies imply support for routines that would take some getting used to, such as drinking a vinegar solution before every meal. But other times, they support behaviors that would be easy to adopt and that you might even follow already. Such is the case when it comes to the protective effects of coffee and tea on blood glucose control. For many people, the question isn’t whether to indulge in one of these beverages, but instead which one makes for a healthier habit. Most recently, a study published last week by the journal BMJ (formerly British Medical Journal) found that countries in which black tea consumption is highest showed the lowest levels of Type 2 diabetes. According to an article on the study published in Britain’s Daily Mail, sales data showed that Ireland consumed the most black tea per capita, followed by Britain and Turkey. These countries showed lower levels of Type 2 diabetes than countries where tea consumption is low, including Brazil, Morocco, and Mexico. While it is possible than many other factors could have affected the relative rates of Type 2 diabetes in these countries, it is notable that the study investigated a link between black tea and various medical conditions — and found a link only with Type 2 diabetes, along with a lesser link with obesity. Researchers speculated that the beneficial effects of black tea might come from substances known as flavonoids, which result from the fermentation of green tea (which has also been found to be beneficial in diabetes) into black tea. Coffee, on the other hand, also has a large body of evidence to s Continue reading >>

The Best 7 Teas That Stabilize Blood Glucose Levels

The Best 7 Teas That Stabilize Blood Glucose Levels

Black tea has a polysaccharide compound which acts similar to the drugs Glyset and Precose. Both of these drugs are usually prescribed for managing type 2 diabetes, and they are efficient when it comes to controlling the signs by lowering sugar production. Although this is the usual tea in a time of the seasonal flu, it is still great when it comes to dealing with the symptoms of this lifelong disease. This tea can help us slow the rate at which the body makes sugar from the starch and sugar we consume by delaying the release of glucose into our blood and by lowering the blood glucose levels. What this tea does is it regulates the blood glucose levels and prevent symptoms such as sugar cravings and fatigue. This tea contains a couple of compounds which help the body to take up sugar, which can be extremely beneficial for those with poor blood glucose control. According to one study, those with type 2 diabetes have an insufficient amount of protein GLUT4. This protein is needed for cells to take in sugar. Ginger contains 2 active ingredients those are 8-gingerols and 6-gingerols. These active ingredients actually increase the activity of this hormone and that allows the uptake of sugar to happen. Bilberries are rich in phytonutrients called anthocyanins that posses antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. It is said that bilberries have benefit when it comes to treatment or prevention of age-related conditions such as hyperglycemia, especially the leaves . Its leaves are abundant in chromium, a mineral which can reduce the blood glucose levels. The traditional use of the bilberry is for vision issues. Also, another beneficial tea is the powdered form of tea called Matcha. Usually, this tea is made from green tea. The great thing about this is that the tea contains only Continue reading >>

Why Drinking Tea May Help Prevent And Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Why Drinking Tea May Help Prevent And Manage Type 2 Diabetes

The fountain of youth still remains elusive, but there's something that seems close: green tea. People have been drinking tea for centuries, and today it's the second most popular drink in the world (after water). Some of that popularity may stem from the many widely recognized benefits of tea, including its reported power to prevent cancer and to sharpen mental health. But tea may offer health benefits related to diabetes, too. “We know people with diabetes have problems metabolizing sugar,” says Suzanne Steinbaum, DO, a cardiologist, director of women’s heart health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “Insulin comes along to decrease sugar, but with type 2 diabetes, the body isn’t so sensitive to insulin, so blood sugar levels go up. Through a complex biochemical reaction, tea — especially green tea — helps sensitize cells so they are better able to metabolize sugar. Green tea is good for people with diabetes because it helps the metabolic system function better.” A 2013 research review published in the Diabetes and Metabolism Journal outlined the potential benefits of tea when it comes to diabetes as well as obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes. It highlighted a Japanese study that found that people who drank 6 or more cups of green tea a day were 33 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than were people who drank less than a cup of green tea a week. It also reported on Taiwanese research that found that people who drank green tea regularly for more than a decade had smaller waists and a lower body fat composition than those who weren't regular consumers of green tea. Drinking tea for diabetes is such a good idea because tea contains substances called polyphenols, which are antioxidants found in every plant. “Polyphenols help r Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

Tea And Diabetes

Tea And Diabetes

Tweet Tea is one of the nation’s favourite drinks and research suggests it’s also a healthy drink. Tea brings a number of health benefits including improving insulin sensitivity. However, research notes that some the benefits are best experienced if you drink your tea without milk. Benefits of tea Research suggests the following benefits may be enjoyed from tea: Improving insulin sensitivity Maintaining healthy blood pressure Preventing blood clots Reducing risk of cardiovascular disease Reducing risks of developing type 2 diabetes Reducing risks of developing cancer How does tea help diabetes? Teas such as black tea, green tea and oolong tea contain polyphenols which researchers believe may increase insulin activity. An American study of 2002 found, however, that addition of milk in tea decreased the insulin-sensitising effects of tea. [22] Can tea prevent diabetes? Polyphenols are known to have anti-oxidative properties which can help protect against inflammation and carcinogens. In other words, the properties in tea can help to prevent type 2 diabetes as well as cancer. A Dutch study from 2009 indicates that drinking three cups of tea (or coffee) could reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 40%. [21] Other factors for preventing type 2 diabetes include: Eating minimal amounts of processed foods Eating fresh vegetables regularly through the day Including physical activity into each day Not smoking Keeping alcohol intake low Tea and stress relief Tea also contains tiny micronutrients called flavonoids which can help parts of the body to function better. There are many different types of flavonoid and each have different health properties. One flavonoid of interest that is found in tea is theanine which can help to control blood pressure and lower stress. Continue reading >>

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