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Best Takeaway Curry For Diabetics

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: The Best Foods To Prevent Or Manage The Disease

Healthy eating is one of the best ways to manage type 2 diabetes. This type of diabetes is strongly linked to excess weight, so calorie reduction and the right kind of diabetes diet can go a long way toward an improvement in overall health. Among the most important components of good nutrition when you have type 2 diabetes are meals with the right mix of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats to keep your blood sugar as normal as possible throughout the day. With these basic building blocks in place, make sure to seek out particular foods and beverages that can give you an extra edge in managing type 2 diabetes, says Beth Reardon, RD, an integrative nutritionist in private practice in Boston and a senior nutrition adviser for Caring.com. Here are some foods to reach for to help you manage your diabetes better. Eat Brown Rice and Other Fiber-Rich Foods White rice has long been known to have a negative effect on blood sugar. Like most "white" foods, it causes blood sugar spikes. A moderate amount of healthy whole grains, such as brown rice, and other fiber-rich foods instead of processed grains may reduce the risk of complications like diabetic neuropathy, which is nerve damage resulting from high blood sugar. Brown rice is packed with fiber, an important component for diabetes management. “Because fiber is not digested by the body, it does not affect blood sugar levels,” Reardon says. “This helps keep blood sugar levels steady and may prevent glucose spikes.” Another way to add fiber to your diet is with beans and other legumes. Research published in April 2012 in Nutrition Journal showed that beans and rice eaten together do not cause as drastic a blood sugar spike as rice alone. Also, a study published in October 2016 in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agricu Continue reading >>

Indian Restaurants - Restaurant Eating - Diabetes Forums

Indian Restaurants - Restaurant Eating - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Most weekends i eat some form of indian food after good beer session. Its normally 2am or later. I usually order 2 deep fried meat samosas ( pastry parcels stuffed with spicy meat mixture) served with side saladfor starters. For mains a chicken vindaloo ( spicy curry)with 2 naan bread or 3/4 chapattis , a portion of fries and a portion of pilau rice. I now know that the rice , chappatis and naan bread is bad for me. They represent over 50% of the meal , what can i replace them with? Is daal ( lentl curry ) any good to bulk up the meal? When i'm not eating indian i'll eat chinese ,50%+ rice or noodles. Any help here? I now know i should limit by beer and will try to make amends. Nobody can tell you precisely what will work for you. Once you get a meter, test before you eat, then (at first) 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after you eat, to see what the meal does with your blood sugars. Until you have a meter, I'd suggest going easy on the carbs. When I eat Chinese, I have no rice or noodles, and I ask that whatever dish I've ordered be prepared without sugar or starch (usually I order something, like broccoli beef, that is not sauce-heavy to begin with). Order something that incorporates a fair portion of nonstarch veggies, and just eat more of the veggies. When I eat Indian, I usually go for Tandoori or Tikka (not Tikka Marsala, which has a sauce), avoid the naan, chapatis and samosas--or eat the center out of a meat samosa, but leave the pastry shell--and order a salad to go along with the meat. Saad paneer (spinach and cheese) does not cause me major issues, either. Daal is definitely a YMMV ite Continue reading >>

Indian Food

Indian Food

Ok as a Brit I do (or should I say did) enjoy a curry!! Since diagnosis I have kept clear of them as with all the sauces etc I should imagine they would send me sky high! One of my colleagues is leaving, and I have been invited out for a curry this Thursday, and so I wondered what you guys thought may be sensible for me to eat. I was thinking of maybe a Chicken Tikka (Clay roasted) with no sauce, just some Basmati rice. And of course instead of what once would have been a good old pint I will stick to my diet coke. I know im being lazy here, but any pointers would be greatly appreciated. The only Indian food I've ever dared to eat since diagnosis is Tandoori Chicken. It's the roasted reddish coloured one, marinated in spices and served with yoghurt dip (Raita). The lack of fattening gravies didn't do bad things to my blood sugar, and I love chicken! I fare well on basmati rice. It is less starchy than the jasmine rice normally used in Chinese cooking and my blood sugar is usually around the 5's range whenever I have it, which is pretty frequently. Do they have some vegetable dish which is not smothered in gravy? You could order that as well. Good luck, and have a nice feast. I'm Singaporean and I have a weakness for curry, though I prefer Singaporean/Malaysian styled ones. Promise me youll always remember: youre braver than you believe, and stronger than you seem, and smarter than you think. I've not had any problems with the curry sauces themselves, what I have found is that I need to watch what type of rice they use. If it's plain, unadulterated basmati, then I can get away with a small portion. Long grain, brown or wild and I have problems. I tend to steer clear of most takeaways - not sure I like "Chicken Bucket" and other inventions that came out of the Raj or ind Continue reading >>

Indian Food For A Diabetic Diet

Indian Food For A Diabetic Diet

An Indian meal of naan, potatoes and a mango lassi to drink may be delicious and classic Indian fare, but it's not appropriate for a diabetic diet. Fortunately, you can enjoy the spicy flavors of Indian cuisine without paying for it with a high blood sugar reading later. Consider adding these Indian foods to your healthy diabetic diet. Video of the Day Tandoori is a fiber-rich, whole-grain bread that's more diabetic-friendly than refined Indian breads like chapati and dosa. Because whole-wheat bread is digested and absorbed more slowly than white bread, it reduces the risk of dangerous blood sugar spikes. Additionally, regularly consuming whole grains can boost your cells' sensitivity to insulin, according to the November 2003 "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition." More insulin-sensitive cells can help make managing your blood sugar easier. Channa masala is a flavorful chickpea-based South Indian classic bursting with dietary fiber. Karen Collins of the American Institute for Cancer Research states that beans like chickpeas contain ample amounts of soluble fiber. Soluble fiber delays digestion of carbs, helping you achieve even blood sugar levels. Additionally, the soluble fiber in chickpeas can help decrease elevated cholesterol levels. Bland vegetables transform into mouth-watering superfoods when prepared as Indian vegetable curry. Containing a variety of nutrient-dense veggies like eggplant, spinach and carrots, vegetable curry is an excellent source of low glycemic index vegetables. The glycemic index is a measurement of how rapidly the carbs in a food end up as blood sugar. Including low glycemic index carbs in your diabetic diet can help you keep your blood sugar levels in check, the Glycemic Index Foundation reports. Bhindi is a flavor-packed Indian side dish Continue reading >>

Eating Out

Eating Out

Having diabetes doesn’t deprive you of eating out. If you eat out regularly, you will need to pay close attention to food choices and serving sizes to manage your weight and diabetes. Don’t limit your enjoyment by thinking you need to go to a special restaurant or eat special meals just because you have diabetes. You’ll soon discover that many restaurants serve foods that are suitable for healthy eating. Most will also value your patronage and are more than happy to help if you can’t find something suitable on the menu. Ask restaurant staff about the dish of your choice and the way it’s been cooked, and request simple changes if required. Try to choose meals that: Are lower in fat and particularly low in saturated fat Contain breads, cereals (preferably wholegrain), vegetables (including legumes) and/or fruits Do not have a large amount of sugar added. Insulin & Eating Out When eating out there a few things you need to consider. Your meal may be served later than usual, so to avoid a ‘hypo’, take your insulin with you and give your injection as the meal arrives. Be sure to choose a meal with enough carbohydrate. Ask for extra bread, rice, potato, fruit or fruit juice if you need more. If you are having a bigger meal with more carbohydrate than usual, you may need to increase your insulin dose prior to the meal on that special occasion. Discuss this with your doctor, dietitian or Credentialled Diabetes Educator first. What to Drink When you arrive ask for a jug of iced water before ordering other drinks. Throughout the meal drink: Water: plain, mineral or soda Low joule/calorie soft drinks Coffee, tea, herbal tea. Don’t drink fruit juice (unless you need additional carbohydrates). If you want to drink alcohol limit it to: 2 standard drinks a day for men 1 Continue reading >>

Other Restaurant Food

Other Restaurant Food

Eating in a sit-down restaurant doesnt guarantee a healthy meal. Portions are often large and foods usually have a lot of fat and sodium added to them during cooking. Try some of these tips for choosing healthier menu items: Work with your server before you order. Dont be afraid to ask questions about the food. If your server doesnt know the answers to your questions, ask him or her to check with the chef. Below are some types of questions you might want to ask. Can the item be grilled or broiled instead of fried? Can you get a baked potato or salad instead of fries? Choose items that are baked, broiled, grilled, or poached instead of fried. Watch for clues on the menu. Crispy or breaded also mean fried. Ask for sauces and salad dressings to be served on the side. They add flavor but can add lots of calories, sodium, and fat. Add sauces and salad dressing by dipping your fork into the sauce or dressing first, then spear a piece of meat or lettuce for a little bit with each bite. Order the smallest size of meat. A grilled chicken breast is a better choice over half a chicken. Or choose a small filet instead of a 12-ounce steak. If portions are large, eat just half of your meal. Save the rest for lunch another day. Think about splitting a dish with a friend. You can each order a salad and share a main course. This can also help you save money! If you like trying new ethnic cuisines, consider the suggestions below: Try steamed mussels, kebobs, Thai shrimp soup, Thai salads, curries, Thai chicken with vegetables, garlic shrimp, or beef with basil and vegetables. Choose a small portion of steamed rice instead of fried rice or noodles. At Mexican places, try to limit the chips you eat to a handful. If thats hard to do, ask your server to take the basket away. Here are some m Continue reading >>

Indian Restaurant - Best Choices Please! - The Blood Sugar Diet By Michael Mosley

Indian Restaurant - Best Choices Please! - The Blood Sugar Diet By Michael Mosley

I am off out on Saturday night for my baby Brothers 40th Birthday on Saturday and we are going for an Indian meal in our local restaurant. Does anyone have any suggestions for what to eat? I love all Indian food but want to make sensible choices as I dont want a bad belly. I will be on the wine, but am such a light drinker that wont be much of a problem. I am also making him a Harry Potter cake he is only 40 after all! I will have to make sure he takes all the left-overs home with him!! Hi, Im new to this but I think I would choose king prawns in a tomato based sauce and lots of vegetable sides, and maybe ask for one spoonful of someone elses basmati rice and avoid naans because once I start on them Id have to eat it all! Id also tell the person who will be sitting opposite me what Im doing so they could a. keep their carbs out of my reach and b. frown repeatedly at me if I was getting tempted to give in and eat them! Hello! I love curry so have to be careful I dont scoff too much but dishes I choose are Chicken Tikka / Chicken Shashlik ( no sauce) with veg sides or a prawn curry Have a lovely meal out! Hadnt thought about prawns and veggie side dishes! So used to just having chicken tikka masala, naan bread and mushroom rice that Ive realised I havent really looked at the rest of the menu in years!!! Shahi murgh tandoori [chargrilled chicken on sizzling onions and peppers] with veg sides; no rice or naan or beer! Ha ha Jackie like I would drink beer? I assume that the poppadums are loaded with carbs too? Really looking forward to making good choices on Saturday now instead of not planning and blowing it all as I usually would have done! I was at our local Indian restaurant a couple of weeks ago. I had chicken tikka starter and tandoori king prawns with salad for mains Continue reading >>

Eating Indian Food With Diabetes

Eating Indian Food With Diabetes

01.69 I'm gonna tell you how you still can have it thought it might seem to be loaded with 08.89 Look at the menu and start planning from the top to the bottom. 11.59 Are you going to be having some chicken, or fish, or meat? 16.68 then we'll decide on the type serving size of your carbohydrate. 22.45 Are you looking for some rice or may be potatoes? 25.86 Which one is the most desirable for you and you can have it? 31.46 So if you are having rice, something like a basmati rice, 34.04 which may be brown is a great choice to have. 37.87 Also they might even have whole wheat naan available for you. 41.98 If you choose the rice to have about three quarters of a cup to a cup, or 48.21 And a lot of the dishes are loaded with good sources of protein that are very high 52.96 in fiber, such as lentils and chickpeas. 55.99 If you start mixing some animal protein, such as chicken or 59.41 fish, those beans are gonna count in your body more like carbohydrates. 04.53 So, your rice or your bread, you're gonna wanna cut back a little bit more on that 08.58 portion if you're adding the beans in and an animal protein. 13.05 So some things we wanna avoid is the fried food, such as samosas and pouri. 18.35 Also, we want to just be careful of ghee, which is clarified butter, and 23.34 coconut milk, because those are both high in calorie and saturated fat. 28.30 Other tomato-based sauces that don't use cream are great, tandoori and tikka. 33.15 You just wanna watch if there's a lot of yogurt on things. 35.91 If it's with the food that you're ordering, maybe get it on the side, 38.85 so that you can control the amount that's being used. 41.88 Often, when you're thinking of Indian food, 44.00 it might be a beautiful buffet of many different options. 47.44 So when you're going up to the buff Continue reading >>

How To Have A Healthier Takeaway - Live Well - Nhs Choices

How To Have A Healthier Takeaway - Live Well - Nhs Choices

Takeawaysare oftencheap, convenient and satisfying but, unfortunately,they're not always very healthy. Some takeaway mealscan push you over your recommended daily maximum amount of salt and fat , which can lead to a variety of health problems, such as heart disease and diabetes. Some takeaways and restaurants now list calories on their menus, whichlets you make a healthier choice. Below are some tips on foods to avoid and healthier options when ordering your favourite takeaway. There are lots of ways to make your trip to the chippy a healthier one. Have a portion of baked beans or mushy peas with your fish and chips. Watch out for other foods that are high in fat, such as pies and sausages. The thicker the chips the better, because they absorb less fat. Try to have a smaller portion or share your chips. Ask for your fish and chips without salt if you want some salt, then add a small amount yourself. Don't eat all the batter around your fish, because it soaks up a lot of fat. If available, have fish coated in breadcrumbs, as it soaks up less fat. Fish and chips that are cooked in oil at the right temperature taste better andabsorb less fat. So watch out for soggy batter and chips, because this is often a sign that the oil wasn't hot enough. Try to avoid: thin-cut chips, pies such as cheese & onionor steak & kidney, and jumbo sausages. Healthier options: fish coated in breadcrumbs, mushy peas, thicker-cut chips without salt. If you're having pizza, choose lower-fat toppings, such as vegetables, ham, fish and prawns. You could ask for some extra veg on your pizza to bump up your daily fruit and veg portions. But if you don't want to increase the saturated fat content and number of calories in your meal, don't ask for extra cheese. With pasta dishes, if you want a lower-fa Continue reading >>

Good Takeaway Food / Restaurant?

Good Takeaway Food / Restaurant?

So ladies what are your restaurant of choice with GD? I had buffer breakfast last weekend. I had one slice of toast, one hash brown, a bowl o melons, bacon, scramble eggs and mushroom. Was yummy and I hit 7.4. I ate one pork bun as snack and hit 9. Eek I haven't really found any safe eating out options yet. Whenever I eat out I tend to not eat enough because I'm afraid of a high reading but then I get hungry soon after dinner! I have had a steak sandwhich with a few hot chips and my reading was about 6.4. I'm interested to see how others go eating out too:) dont' eat thai or chinese- full of sugar! Ive had steak and chips and been around the 5.6,5.9 range. If you are going italian- opt for a meaty lasagne if you real want pasta- the more meat and ricotta the better as this makes it low gi. Tacos are also low go! We have these once a weeks at home just using the ones from supermarket the ones 'stuff n stand'. If I have two I get about 5.5. If I have three about 6.0! I find Nandos is pretty good - they do a multigrain wrap or you could have chicken (my fave is BBQ thigh pieces) with salad or corn. Also, ate a burger and a couple handfuls of chips at Grill'd last week. I was nervous about my reading but it came back at under 6! Good to know about the tacos, Shell! We used to have them once a week as well and I've been a bit worried they would be high gi. I'm going to add them to the shopping list this week :) Yes good one ness, I had nandos chicken with some naughty chips and was 6.0 so was happy with that for a treat. My lasagne I make is low gi and I usually get 5.6-5.8. I try to eat lean meat and veggies most nights but u need good recipes for some nights! With my tacos I make sure I fill them up so u r eating lots of the lean mince and tomatoes so that u make it even Continue reading >>

Takeaway Foods - Diabetes - Healingwell.com Forum

Takeaway Foods - Diabetes - Healingwell.com Forum

i want to hear everyones opinions on chipshop chinese food etc as i still eat these types of food I love chinese food! You just have to be careful because it can really raise your sugars. i had a chinese last nite my reading was 6.3 before i eat which was good after i eat chinese 2 hours later i was 18.6 which was very high i had chicken curry and chips,i'm still trying to learn all about this but to be honest i'm a bit dum wen it comes down to all this stuff about carbs and stuff i'll never get used to this A good idea is to stay away of the shiny sauce that is sometimes used in chinese cuisine... this has a lot of sugar in it. Chips are not a good idea either, especially when combined with something that has sugar in it. Try more steamed/roasted with chicken *no sauce* for a while and see if it makes a difference. Learning your carb amounts is a lot like learning your favorite sports figure's stats, only not as fun. I doubt you'd ever say you were dumb about that... it's all just going to take a little time. The best part is most foods you buy are labeled with the amount of carbs in a serving as well as the size of a serving. Start paying attention to the labels and pretty soon it becomes easier. Hang in there, buddy. You're doing ok. Just coming to this forum is a step in the right direction and shows you are trying to learn to control your diabetes instead of letting it control you. "As one goes through life one learns if you don't paddle your own canoe you don't move." I used to work in a Chinese resturant (and got some great training for home use). REAL chinese food does not have anywhere near the same levels of starch (as thickner) or sugar as what you get at a takeout/away place. If you are a regular, ask them to cut out the starch and most of the sugars. Other Continue reading >>

Eating Out With Gestational Diabetes

Eating Out With Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (GDM) can sometimes make you feel like you’re missing out. Missing out on a casual snack, a rich and creamy meal, that extra soda or that piece of cake you’ve been coveting. And GDM comes about at a time in your pregnancy when you’re probably tired and want to indulge a little. Annoyingly GDM is there, shaking its head at you, ordering you to put down the hot chips and put your hands where it can see them. By now, after looking through GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com, hopefully you’ll have noticed that there is in fact a whole lot of delicious food you can eat despite how you felt after your initial diagnosis. And yes, cooking with GDM does take planning and some re-thinking your approach to food, but once you understand the basics you’ll feel empowered and hungry! So managing your meals in the ‘safety’ of you own kitchen is all well and good, but what happens when you want to eat out or order in? Here are some helpful tips for approaching these kinds of meals. Article written by Lisa Taylor (GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com founder) and Natasha Leader (Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator and GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com In-Kitchen Dietitian) “Surely it’s okay just this once…” It’s tricky to say just how often eating out should be done. It depends on the quality of what you’re eating and your overall health. When you’re pregnant there is more to think about from a food safety perspective, which can reduce your options and can in turn push you towards not so healthy options – unless you plan carefully. Food prepared outside the home is more likely to be higher in sodium (salt) and unhealthy fats compared to what you might make at home and this has implications for general health in the long t Continue reading >>

Can I Still Have Take Away??

Can I Still Have Take Away??

Now I have been diagnosed with Diabetes and high Cholesterol. Are there any takeaways better than the others I could have, only we usually sit as a family on Saturday night order take away and watch tv, Any advice please. Thanks. As long as it's a rare treat. Beware that a good curry sauce will likely be swimming in cream and oil. A stir fry is actually not so bad after all. Check the ingredients. So it's would you say Chinese is the better choice. Gosh this is going to be difficult.. Difficult to say. There's a reputation stir fry is less fatty, and fresh veg BUT. . . Like I said keep it as a rare treat, but you'll have to be strict the rest of the week. There's a similar question on weight loss forum with a keema naan coming in with 850 calories. And a certain type of pizza with 2500 -that's more than a day's intake if you're trying to lose weight - and pizza is kind of part of Mediterranean diet. Caused by fats which will almost certainly be sources of cholesterol. Diabetes and high cholesterol seem to go together (I wonder why - not). Self control is your best weapon. Can you share some of the food or leave a bit in the container - instead of munching the whole portion? Thanks for the info, I will go and look at the other post. Self control, save some or share... These are all swear words lol.. Suppose I have to retrain myself. Its all so new Again thanks. Food intake control, small portion, home cooed fresh food is best till you come down to as acceptable level in blood test numbers. One take away, two take away and the you are in trouble. I usually do my shopping on a Sunday once we are all together, so not organized with diabetes yet, whole new life style change for me Plan you menus perhaps. If it works for you. Menus for diabetes are healthy and just right for Continue reading >>

10 Best Diabetic-friendly Recipes

10 Best Diabetic-friendly Recipes

Decadent chocolate puddings, scrumptious parfaits, luscious cheesecakes topped off with fruit. If youve been diagnosed with diabetes , you have to bid farewell to all things sweet , right? Wrong. "If people are too restrictive and don't allow themselves to indulge every now and then, they can get frustrated and go on binges,'' says Dr. A. K. Jhingan, a diabetologist from Primus Hospital and Chairman of Delhi Diabetes Research Center. A healthy diabetic diet is all about balance. So yes, diabetics should try to cut down on foods and drinks high on sugar as a general rule, but you shouldnt embark on a sad new diet, dull and devoid of pleasures. He adds, follow the routine of eating small and frequent meals to keep your blood sugar levels in control. So all you have to do is limit your portions and choose wisely. Who says you can't have chocolate when you're watching what you eat? You can still get cozy with hot chocolate and a sprinkle of cinnamon on top or a parfait with whipped cream as long as you skip the sugar . You would assume even a heavenly phirni is too sinful to appear on a diabetes-friendly menu , but things arent always as they seem. And if youre a fruit lover, youre in luck - its the easiest and healthiest way to dress up a dessert due to its natural sweetness and fiber content. When adding fruit to your meal plan, choose fruits lower in natural sugars, such as berries, melon, and apples. For times when your taste buds scream for something a little more fun and flavourful than a basic banana or apple, weve got you our top dietitian-approved ideas. For a power-packed diabetes snack , you can always opt for a mix of nuts and dried fruits such as almonds with raisins or goji berries since almonds limit the blood sugar spike and also help you keep full. You can Continue reading >>

20 Best Dishes For Diabetics

20 Best Dishes For Diabetics

Diet plays a important role in keeping a tab on Diabetes. A diabetic diet should consist of a good combination of nutrients i.e. carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins and minerals to stay fit and fine and to keep the blood sugar levels in check. But that doesn’t mean that all your all low-carb, low-sugar meals have to be tasteless and boring. Interestingly, our traditional Indian diets, with slight modifications can be turned into diabetic friendly food. rnrnWe give you a list of 20 dishes including all courses so you can jazz up your dinner table with healthy yet tasty dishes. Continue reading >>

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