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Best Red Wine For Diabetes

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Adults with diabetes are up to two to four times as likely to have heart disease than people who don’t have diabetes, says the American Heart Association. Some evidence suggests that drinking moderate amounts of red wine could lessen the risk of heart disease, but other sources caution people with diabetes against drinking, period. So what’s the deal? A few words on diabetes More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. That’s nearly 1 in 10 people, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Most cases of the disease are type 2 diabetes — a condition in which the body doesn’t make enough insulin, uses insulin incorrectly, or both. This can cause high levels of sugar in the blood. People with type 2 diabetes must control this sugar, or blood glucose, with a combination of medications, like insulin, and lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise. Diet is key to diabetes management. Found in many foods such as breads, starches, fruits, and sweets, carbohydrate is the macronutrient that causes blood sugar levels to go up. Managing carbohydrate intake helps people manage their blood sugar. But contrary to popular belief, alcohol may actually cause blood sugar levels to go down instead of up. How red wine affects blood sugar According to the American Diabetes Association, drinking red wine — or any alcoholic beverage — can lower blood sugar for up to 24 hours. Because of this, they recommend checking your blood sugar before you drink, while you drink, and monitoring it for up to 24 hours after drinking. Intoxication and low blood sugar can share many of the same symptoms, so failing to check your blood glucose could cause others to assume you’re feeling the effects of an alcoholic beverage when in realit Continue reading >>

Red Wine May Be Good For Diabetics But Only For Those On Mediterranean Diet

Red Wine May Be Good For Diabetics But Only For Those On Mediterranean Diet

No compatible source was found for this media. Red wine has many proven health benefits. In recent years, scientists had conflicting hypotheses about the health effects of red wine among diabetics. A new study found red wine is beneficial to diabetes patients who are on a Mediterranean diet. The health benefits and risks of red wine among diabetes patients require careful interpretation, which leaves doctors a bit cautious whether they should advise their patients to drink or abstain from it altogether. A research team led by senior study author Iris Shai from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, looked into a random mix of 224 patients with type 2 diabetes. The participants ranged from 40 to 75 years old. The patients were not alcohol drinkers but were advised to drink five ounces of either red wine, white wine or mineral water during dinner in the span of two years, wherein they also followed a Mediterranean diet. This type of diet is characterized by its focus on plant-based foods and the use of healthy fats like olive oil. Instead of salt, natural spices were used to flavor food. Mediterranean diet has been found to be good for the heart. Eighty-seven percent of the participants completed the two-year test, wherein 80 percent drank a daily dose of wine. Researchers found that the red wine-drinking group had increased levels of 'good' high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. This 'good' cholesterol drives low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, commonly known as 'bad' cholesterol, from the arteries. This resulted in lowered risks of heart disease. The red wine group also had thinner waistlines and lower blood pressure compared to participants who drank mineral water. Apart from a small group of participants whose alcohol processing levels are slower, majorit Continue reading >>

Does Dry Red Wine Affect Glucose Levels?

Does Dry Red Wine Affect Glucose Levels?

Foods that contain carbohydrates and alcohol, like dry red wine, are especially likely to affect blood sugar, also called blood glucose levels. If you are diabetic, it's especially important to monitor your blood glucose and to watch how much and what kind of alcohol you drink. Video of the Day Cabernet sauvignon, pinot noir and merlot are some of the driest of the red wines. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, these wines contain about 4, 3 and 4 grams of carbohydrates, respectively, in a 5-ounce serving. Foods that contain carbohydrates -- especially in liquid form -- can cause a drastic and sudden increase in blood sugar levels. In addition, certain types of alcohol, such as dry red wine, may cause your glucose levels to increase initially. However, drinking more than one serving of dry red wine at a time may lead to the development of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose levels, if you are diabetic. Continue reading >>

Red Wine Boosts Heart Health In Type 2 Diabetes

Red Wine Boosts Heart Health In Type 2 Diabetes

Science has what can seem like a million different answers for this question. If you're a woman under 45, the answer might be no -- a daily drink could raise your risk of breast cancer. But if you’re a man in your 60s, the evidence is mixed. Some studies show it might be good for men’s hearts, while other, more recent studies suggest there’s no benefit from moderate drinking. Throw a chronic condition into the mix, like diabetes, and the answers are even more confusing. Alcohol can lower blood sugar, which might seem like a good thing -- unless you drink too much. In that case, drinking can cause an episode of dangerously low blood sugar. Beyond blood sugar, there’s been limited evidence that moderate drinking might improve heart health. If true, that’s important since people with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease. That’s why a new study is a standout. It found that having a daily glass of red wine modestly improved some measures of heart health. Researchers were precise when they designed the study, including only men and women between the ages of 40 and 75 with stable, type 2 diabetes -- they couldn’t need more than two insulin injections a day or be on an insulin pump. People were also excluded if they smoked or had a history of heart attack, stroke, or a recent major surgery. They also did something that’s unusual for alcohol studies: They randomly assigned 224 people to drink a glass of red or white wine or water with dinner every day for 2 years. That’s the longest any group has been followed for this kind of test. They were also a little sneaky. When they were recruiting for the study, they didn’t tell people they were going to test the health effects of alcohol. Instead, they told them they would be eating a hea Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 Diabetes. What Types Of Wine Are Safer To Drink In Terms Of Sugar Content?

I Have Type 1 Diabetes. What Types Of Wine Are Safer To Drink In Terms Of Sugar Content?

Open this photo in gallery: The question I'm a 50-year-old who loves wine but also has been fighting type 1 diabetes for almost 35 years. Other than the obvious ice wines, ports, etc., are there particular grapes that could be considered higher in carbohydrate (sugar) count than others? Does red versus white versus rosé make a difference? The answer Although I've "prescribed" a few wines to physicians who've asked for recommendations, I myself am no doctor. Nor am I a chemist. So take what I'm about to say for what it's worth. You're certainly on the right track by avoiding sweet beverages such as icewine and port. Sugar is a diabetic's enemy, and those wines have plenty. When it comes to "dry" wines (I put that in quotation marks because there's always at least a trace of sugar even in the driest wines), the best choice generally is red. As a category, red wines tend to be lower in sugar than white or rosé. It all depends on the specific wine; some reds, such as Yellowtail Shiraz from Australia, are sweeter than, say, a typical white Sancerre from France. I would also go so far as to say that European reds are more likely – speaking very, very generally – to be drier that those from very sunny New World regions, such as California and South Australia. That said, the tiny differences in sugar concentration are unlikely to make much of a difference if you intend to drink no more than a glass or two over the course of a couple of hours. If you're on prescribed medication, including insulin, and I suspect you are, you should absolutely consult with a doctor or nutritionist experienced with diabetes. Health experts I've spoken with would say that sugar is not your only concern. Alcohol plays into the equation. After drinking alcohol, you may experience low blood gluco Continue reading >>

Red Wine 'benefits People With Type 2 Diabetes'

Red Wine 'benefits People With Type 2 Diabetes'

A glass of red wine a day can improve cardiac health and help manage cholesterol for patients with type 2 diabetes, according to findings in a 2-year study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. Moderate alcohol consumption has been linked to improved cardiovascular and total mortality rates, and a glass of red wine a day as part of a healthy diet has been considered beneficial for some time. There is evidence that type 2 diabetes is less prevalent among moderate drinkers, yet the risk-benefit balance is controversial for such patients, due to a lack of long-term randomized studies. Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev-Soroka Medical Center and Nuclear Research Center Negev, Israel, wondered if both red and white wine might improve glucose control, depending on alcohol metabolism and genetic profiling. Previous research has suggested that ethanol (alcohol) is the key, meaning that alcoholic drinks other than red wine could be equally beneficial; others claim that red wine has particularly advantageous properties. Potential benefits for people with type 2 diabetes People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease, as well as lower levels of "good" HDL cholesterol. High levels of HDL cholesterol can reduce the risk for heart disease and stroke, as it absorbs cholesterol and carries it back to the liver, where it is flushed from the body. 29.1 million people in the US probably have diabetes, or 9.3% of the population 21 million have been diagnosed An estimated further 8.1 million have not been diagnosed. Should patients with type 2 diabetes be recommended to take up moderate alcohol consumption? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) leave the decision to the individual; the American Heart Association (AHA) recommen Continue reading >>

Is Red Wine Good For Diabetics? Study Claims The Tipple’s Main Antioxidant Can Help Reduce Artery Stiffness For Type 2 Sufferers

Is Red Wine Good For Diabetics? Study Claims The Tipple’s Main Antioxidant Can Help Reduce Artery Stiffness For Type 2 Sufferers

Many people count a glass of red wine as one of their guilty pleasures. Yet, drinking the occasional Merlot may protect type 2 diabetes patients from heart attacks and strokes. Researchers have found an antioxidant, known as resveratrol, in red wine reduces artery stiffness in type 2 diabetics, which is a known cause of heart-related illness. Study author Dr Naomi Hamburg, chief of vascular biology, Boston University School of Medicine, said: 'This adds to emerging evidence that there may be interventions that may reverse the blood vessel abnormalities that occur with aging and are more pronounced in people with type 2 diabetes and obesity.' Resveratrol is found in the skin of red grapes and gives wine its color. It is also found in peanuts and berries. Researchers from Boston University measured the stiffness of the body's main artery, known as the aorta, in 57 type 2 diabetes patients. Patients then consumed daily doses of 100mg resveratrol for two weeks, followed by a 300mg dose every day for a fortnight and finally a placebo for four weeks. Of those with high aortic stiffness at the start of the study, the 300mg dose improved flexibility by 9.1 percent and the 100mg dose by 4.8 percent, while stiffness worsened with placebo. This effect was not seen in patients without aortic stiffness at the start of the study. Dr Hamburg said: 'The effect of resveratrol may be more about improving structural changes in the aorta and less about the relaxation of blood vessels, and people with more normal aortic stiffness may not get as much benefit. Results will be presented at the Peripheral Vascular Disease 2017 Scientific Sessions in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This comes after Professor Gordon Shepherd from the Yale School of Medicine said drinking red wine sparks reactions in the Continue reading >>

Does Wine Help Or Harm People With Diabetes?

Does Wine Help Or Harm People With Diabetes?

With commentary from study author Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Doctors have long faced a paradox when advising their patients with type 2 diabetes on drinking alcohol. Moderate drinking has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, which would benefit people with diabetes who are at increased risk of the disease. Yet, people with diabetes have traditionally been advised to reduce their alcohol consumption to help better control their glucose levels. Now preliminary results of a new study presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Prague, found that adults with diabetes may be able to safely drink in moderation and reap the heart benefits. The study randomly assigned 224 patients with controlled type 2 diabetes to have either mineral water, white wine or red wine (about a 5-ounce serving of wine) with dinner every night for two years. All patients were following a healthy Mediterranean diet with no calorie restrictions. Researchers found that red-wine drinkers had a modest improvement in high-density lipoproteins (HDL), the good cholesterol, and also had improved apolipoprotein A1, a component of HDL. Those who drank red or white wine also saw modest improvements in glucose metabolism. Drinking one 5-ounce serving of red or white wine wasn’t associated with any negative effect on medication use, blood pressure or liver function tests. “Obviously excess drinking is harmful, but there is no good evidence to discourage moderate consumption among diabetics who have no other contraindication,” says Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and one of the authors of the study. “This first long-term large scale alc Continue reading >>

Does White Wine Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics?

Does White Wine Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics?

The polyphenols in red wine may help prevent metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes by helping your body regulate blood-sugar levels and fat metabolism, according to a January 2011 “Food and Function” study. White wine also contains such polyphenols, but in much smaller amounts. Recommending any type of wine to help control diabetes is premature and, under certain circumstances, is risky. Video of the Day Any type of alcohol, including white wine, can cause hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, immediately after consuming it and for eight to 12 hours after drinking, according to the American Diabetes Association. If you choose to drink white wine, check your blood glucose before sipping it and also eat while or before you drink it. Also drink your wine only when your blood-glucose levels are under control and consult a doctor before you incorporate white wine into your diet, recommends the association. The symptoms of hypoglycemia and drunkenness are similar – disorientation, sleepiness and dizziness. The ligands in red wine – mainly ellagic acid and epicatechin gallate, or ECG – have an affinity to your peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ , or PPARγ, which is a key factor in both glucose and lipid metabolism. In fact, the affinity is similar to the type 2 diabetes drug rosiglitazone, according to A. Zoechling, lead author for the “Food and Function” study. That raises the possibility that red wine might someday be used in diabetes prevention and treatment, but more research is needed. Red wines contain a much higher level of ligands than white wines. Though the amount can vary among red wines, many reds contain 1 g per liter of these polyphenols, according to "Wine Spectator" magazine. White wines, on the other hand, have less than .1 g per liter. Continue reading >>

Ask The Diet Doctor: Wine On A Low-sugar Diet

Ask The Diet Doctor: Wine On A Low-sugar Diet

Q: If I’m avoiding sugar, can I still drink wine? A: Yes, even if you’re cutting back on carbs and sugars, there’s still a place for an evening glass of pinot noir in your diet. [Tweet this good news!] I have yet to find a client (outside of extreme competition dieting) who needed to eliminate wine completely in order to reach any sort of health goal. Not that you need another reason to drink vino, but it is actually healthy for you. Some population-based studies show a relationship between wine intake and improvements in insulin sensitivity. This makes your body more efficient at using carbs, which leads to better health and easier fat loss. One study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that women who drank two glasses of wine a day for eight weeks experienced a 7-percent increase in insulin sensitivity. Wine has also long been considered one of the key health-promoting components of the Mediterranean diet. RELATED: Your Guide to Low-Calorie Cocktails There are two things to keep in mind when imbibing on a low-sugar diet. 1. Dry wines contain minimal sugars. Choosing red or white doesn’t matter as much as opting for dry over sweet. Dry wines generally have less than 1 gram (g) of carbohydrates (sugars) per ounce while the carb content of sweet wines can be upwards of 1.5 to 2g per ounce. These sugars can add up quickly: Technically one serving of wine is five ounces, but six to nine ounces is generally more realistic, especially when you’re pouring a glass at home to unwind. However, it is impossible (and unnecessary) to avoid sugar completely, so just adjust your wine intake to fit your personal sugar guidelines. Dry Reds Pinot noir: 0.68g carbs per ounce Cabernet franc: 0.71g Merlot: 0.74g Cabernet sauvignon: 0.75g Shiraz/syra Continue reading >>

A Glass Of Wine A Day May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

A Glass Of Wine A Day May Help Control Type 2 Diabetes

If you're in the habit of drinking wine with dinner, there may be a bonus beyond the enjoyment of sipping a glass at night. A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine adds to the evidence that drinking a moderate amount of wine can be good for your health. The evidence comes from a new two-year-long study on people with diabetes. Researcher Iris Shai of Ben Gurion University says in Israel and elsewhere, lots of people with diabetes get the message that alcohol — even in moderation — can be harmful. "There is a myth that alcohol is not so safe for them," Shai says. In order to test the influence of wine on people with diabetes, Shai recruited about 225 people who already had elevated blood sugar, and they agreed to follow a Mediterranean style diet for two years. Everyone in the study was eating the same mix of foods but when it came to what to drink, some began drinking one glass of red wine per day, some began drinking one glass of white wine per day and others drank mineral water. And at the end of the study? "We found that a glass of red wine with dinner can improve the cardiovascular health of people with Type 2 diabetes," Shai says. In particular, Shai found that compared to people who drank mineral water with dinner, the wine drinkers — both those who drank white and red — benefited from improvements in blood sugar control. And the red wine drinkers got an additional benefit: They saw improvements in their levels of good cholesterol. The effects are not huge, but physician Christopher Wilcox of Georgetown University Medical Center says they could be significant. "One glass of alcohol per day had these admittedly modest but worthwhile benefits," he says. There's been a lot of interest in the idea that specific compounds in red wine may help p Continue reading >>

Red Or White Wine? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Red Or White Wine? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » Either as long as they're dry. If sweet they'll be richer in carbs. I always go for a Cabernet. From Google - Research has shown that drinking white wine helps keep lung tissues healthy. Cons: White wines are the most acidic, meaning they're the worst for your teeth. In addition, whites contain far less of the heart-healthy and cancer-preventing antioxidants than reds do, and have about the same amount of calories.25 Feb 2016 A couple of glasses of dry red wine like a merlot doesn't affect my BG control. I find red wine has a negligible effect on bg levels. Prosecco - very dry - doesn't affect my BG at all. I can't drink white - instant indigestion Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member Dry and strong is best so all the sugar has been fermented out! Although, I think you should treat some of the studies with some caution. Personally, I like a nice bottle (not all at once) As with everything it's about personal preference. You can always check bs after a glass, allow time to get into system, to see if either has an effect on your bloods. Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family. Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android Continue reading >>

Best Red Wine For Diabetics | Red Wines, Wine And Nice Meals

Best Red Wine For Diabetics | Red Wines, Wine And Nice Meals

Ways to Get Rid of Bad Breath Naturally : 10 Ways to Fight Bad Breath such as brushing twice, scraping tongue, avoid smoking and alcohol, protect gums, etc. How to Make Heavenly Homemade Fruit Wines -- I've been wanting to get into making my own liquors. NOTE: I seriously just learned that this isn't actually legal. I just sort of assumed that it was legal to distill your own liquor for private use, as long as you weren't selling. #howtomakeyourownwine Wave goodbye to arm flab after this awesome workout!Wave goodbye to arm flab after this awesome workout! Do you know about the olive oil fraud? The olive oil you are buying may not be olive oil! Learn which oils are really olive oil. How to Pair Chocolate With the Right Wine Enjoy a wine tasting night for as an anniversary gift idea for your parents. Is Red Wine Really Good For You? Food Network's Ellie Krieger Weighs In On Popular Heart Health Theories Researchers say the polyphenols in dark chocolate can help the body form more nitric oxide, a compound that causes blood vessels to dilate and blood to flow more easily. Amendment XXI Wines, 2548 Street, will present the Think Pink! Rose Wine Tasting, featuring fresh and fruity French roses from 4 to 7 p. End your hectic day by drowning out your troubles with help from the rough day wine glass. The novelty design helps you gauge how much wine to serve depending on whether youve had an easy day, rough day, or a dont even ask type of day. How to Make Wine Using Fresh Concord Grapes If you are lucky enough to live in an area where Concord grapes are grown, you can make a simple wine using the fresh grapes. For every gallon of wine you plan to make you will need approximately 6 to 8 pounds of fresh, clean Concord grapes. 'Nuf said. Happy Wine Wednesday! @Tami Arnold Brannon @ Continue reading >>

Drinking Wine Is Linked To A Lower Risk Of Diabetes

Drinking Wine Is Linked To A Lower Risk Of Diabetes

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. Drinking alcohol—especially wine—every few days may help protect against type 2 diabetes, suggests a new study published in the journal Diabetologia. People in the study who drank three to four days a week were about 30% less likely to develop diabetes than those who drank less than once a week. This isn’t the first study to find a link between drinking moderately—having up to 7 drinks a week for women and up to 14 drinks a week for men—and a reduced diabetes risk, compared to not drinking at all. (Heavy drinking, however, is known to increase the risk of diabetes.) For the new study, researchers analyzed data from more than 70,000 healthy Danish adults who were surveyed about their health and drinking habits around 2007. They tracked them for five years to see who developed type 2 diabetes. People who had the lowest risk for diabetes were those who drank alcohol at moderate—and slightly more than moderate—levels. Men who drank 14 drinks a week had a 43% lower risk of diabetes than men who did not drink at all; women who drank nine drinks a week had a 58% reduced risk. TIME Health Newsletter Get the latest health and science news, plus: burning questions and expert tips. View Sample Sign Up Now The timing of those drinks also mattered. Drinking three to four days a week was linked to the biggest risk reduction. For women, very infrequent drinking (less than one day a week) was also associated with slightly lower diabetes rates, compared to being a lifetime abstainer. “For the same total weekly amount of alcohol, spreading it out on more days is better than drinking it all together,” said lead author Janne Tolstrup, professor of epidemiology and intervention research at the University of Southern Denmark’s Nati Continue reading >>

Is Red Wine At Dinner Good For Type 2 Diabetes?

Is Red Wine At Dinner Good For Type 2 Diabetes?

A glass of red wine each evening with dinner may offer heart health perks to people with type 2 diabetes. A two-year study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine is the first long-term study aimed at assessing the effects and safety of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol in people with type 2 diabetes, who are more at risk for developing cardiovascular disease than the general population. Those with type 2 diabetes also tend to have lower levels of HDL, the "good" cholesterol. The researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev reported that over two years, red wine helped improve signs of cardiac health by modestly increasing levels of HDL cholesterol and lowering overall cholesterol. The randomized controlled intervention trial involved 224 controlled diabetes patients aged 45 to 75, who generally abstained from alcohol. The patients were randomly assigned to drink 5 ounces of red wine, white wine, or mineral water (the control group) with their dinner for two years. They were all given instructions to follow a well-balanced Mediterranean diet plan that did not have a calorie restriction. The researchers performed genetic tests that showed how quickly the patients metabolized alcohol, as well as various lipid (cholesterol) tests. They also measured glucose control, blood pressure, liver function tests, medication use, and other symptoms at several time points during the two-year follow-up. Compared with the group that drank water, patients in the red wine group had improvements in their lipid tests, the study showed. "Red wine was found to be superior in improving overall metabolic profiles, mainly by modestly improving the lipid profile, by increasing good HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1, one of the major constituents of HDL cholesterol, while decrea Continue reading >>

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