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Best Probiotic For Metformin

Timing Your Metformin Dose

Timing Your Metformin Dose

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. In many cases all that is needed is some patience. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Metformin in its extended release form is not one of them. As the name suggests, the ER version of the pill slowly releases the drug into your body over a period that, from my observations, appears to last 8 to 12 hours. Though it is supposed to release over a full 24 hours, this does not appear to be the case, at least not with the generic forms my insurer will pay for. Because there seems to be a span of hours when these extended release forms of metformin release the most drug into your blood stream, when you take your dose may affect how much impact the drug has on your blood sugars after meals or when you wake up. For example, the version I take, made by Teva, releases Continue reading >>

What Do You Think Of Probiotics?

What Do You Think Of Probiotics?

Im just alittle hesitant to but bacteria in my body although I know its the good kind. Make me alittle skiddish!! haha. But I really want to try it. My friend also suggested Aloe Vera juice from Whole Foods or Trader Joes. She says to drink 2 oz a day. It doesnt taste that bad and it is supposed to help your stomach as well Riley- you bought yours at Whole Foods? Do you know the name of it? I would prefer taking only 1a day. Im not a good pill taker. (you should see my take my daily prenatal. Its pretty comical!!) Im just alittle hesitant to but bacteria in my body although I know its the good kind. Make me alittle skiddish!! haha. But I really want to try it. My friend also suggested Aloe Vera juice from Whole Foods or Trader Joes. She says to drink 2 oz a day. It doesnt taste that bad and it is supposed to help your stomach as well Riley- you bought yours at Whole Foods? Do you know the name of it? I would prefer taking only 1a day. Im not a good pill taker. (you should see my take my daily prenatal. Its pretty comical!!) When I think about being pregnant and having a group of cells grow inside my uterus, that is how I feel. A little skeeved out. So I try to only think of it as a baby, not a group of cells. lol Breastfeeding, co-sleeping, baby wearing, cloth diapering family! Continue reading >>

Taking Metformin With Acidophilus

Taking Metformin With Acidophilus

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Metformin + Acidophilus = No Side Effects (for me) To counteract the effects of 1500 mg of Metformin, I was eating two teaspoons of yogurt before I took each pill. It worked. But one day I ran out of yogurt, so I tried taking an acidophilus pill before my morning Metformin pill. Acidophilus is the powder form of the friendly bacteria (flora) that live in our intestines. If your flora gets depleted, you can have diarrhea and gas. Acidophilus works! I got this idea from my son's pediatrician. When my son had diarrhea last year, he told me to go out and get something called Culturelle. It worked like a charm. My acidophilus pills are from Meijer's. I've seen them in other places, too. The key word is "probiotic." At this point, I only have to take one pill every other day. I think that as my body grows more and more accustomed to Metformin, I'll be able to take the pill less frequently and eventually not at all. Just wanted to share this with others in case it helps. Last edited by MommyJenny; 09-06-2006 at 09:35 PM. Success! Son Alexander born 08/06/04 with Metformin (1000 mg) and Clomid (150 mg) Now back on Metformin (1500 mg) and losing weight with Weight Watchers Core Plan - 35 lbs. (over 10%) lost! Considering TTC #2 in 01/07 if I can lose 17.5 more pounds Acidophilus is the stuff that counters yeast, right? Met technically helps with yeast overgrowth by lowering the circulating insulin in our bodies. the less sugar we have, the less yeast to feed on, therefore making yeast infections less common. Acid. also Continue reading >>

Metformin And Probiotics

Metformin And Probiotics

Everyone knows that metformin gives you pretty horrible diarrhea, but I haven't heard anyone suggest trying to fix it with probiotics, including of course yogurt. I just started taking metformin and happened to add not yogurt but cottage cheese to my diet - and coincidentally or not the problem seems to have moderated quite a bit. It seems pretty obvious to *try*, but I haven't seen it online and certainly the doctors and nutritionists never mentioned it. So ... anyone? Hi Jx, there are a few issues at hand. First, the assumption that the cause of the gut issues is metformin interfering with gut flora. We dont know that metformin disrupts gut flora, do we? Why not antibiotics? Slippery slope. Treat the side effects of one medication with another, and another... you take antibiotics, you have a bigger problem because it causes diarrhea and an overgrowth of yeast and fungus. Then you need to take an antifungal- which also causes more problems. Vicious cycle. Why not yogurt. Yogurt, assuming you make your own, only has probiotics that are effective in the presence of dairy. Everything Ive read is that store bought yogurt doesnt really have any live cultures, and that milk cultures arent the answer to anything except if you eat dairy. Ok, so you eat cottage cheese and it helps. Id narrow it down to either the fats, which could act as a coating for your gut to protect it. Or high protein content- you could test this by trying essential amino acids. Ive found them to be very helpful for gut issues. Probiotics? A lot of people find theyre helpful for gut issues and to combat problems caused by antibiotics. Ive tried tons of them for my own gut issues and the only one Ive found to feel like it possibly helps is kombucha tea. I dont take metformin, Im on this site because my mo Continue reading >>

Metformin?

Metformin?

Hello OH! So In all of this fun of pre-op doctor appointments, tests and running around, I have been told I am pre-diabetic or borderline diabetic. My GP gave me a Rx for Metformin, and told me it would help my body better use my insulin and some 6 week blood sugar number down, had a bunch of letters in the title but I forget now. ANYHOW. Metformin... have any of you used it? I goggled it after I got it home, should have done so before hand or I think I wouldn't have taken it. A bit TMI I am sorry but true to the damn side effects at 1am I was woken with sharp abdominal cramping and had to run to the toilet. And then about every hour after that. Took some immodium, but it hasn't helped. Is this medication REALLY necessary!? Is there something else that will help with insulin and blood sugar? Since I am not TECHNICALLY diabetic, do I need to bother? One of the other side effects I noticed was an increase in sweating, while doing almost nothing in my air conditioned home. WTF. Having worked with Endocrinologists for several years and also being on metformin myself, I can tell you that it is the #1 first line of defense (other than diet and exercise) for diabetes. The side effects are unfortunate, yes, but they may work themselves out after a few days. If not, there are other forms of metformin that can have lesser GI side effects. Such as, Fortamet and Glumetza. Just keep in mind these drugs may not be on your insurance formulary and you could have to pay out of pocket if you cannot get a prior authorization. Hope this helpful info for you. :) Start Wt: 355 Surgery Wt: 331 Current Wt: 253 Goal Wt: 175 Had RNY on 7/10/13 Hi Andi - I was on Metformin for years (2000mg per day****il I had WLS and was able to get off it. The gastro side effects SUCK! I took all 4 of my table Continue reading >>

Probiotic To Reduce Metformin Side Effects

Probiotic To Reduce Metformin Side Effects

Probiotic to reduce metformin side effects Probiotic to reduce metformin side effects A small company in Louisiana has just received a patent to sell a product that is supposed to reduce metformin-associated diarrhea and also enhance metformin's glucose lowering effects. The product is a mixture of inulin, beta-glucan and bluberry pomace (powder). The authors claim that this mixture promotes growth of "good bacteria" in the gut which, in turn, reduce diarrhea and enhance metformin action. Here are two of their publications: " A Novel Cobiotic... " and " Addition of a Gastrointestinal Microbiome Modulator to Metformin... " Before you scoff too much, I stumbled across this information because I was trying to find more information about the recent paper showing that the real location of action of metformin is in the ileum (see Calgary Diebetic's post about it ). I think we're all beginning to realize that our intestinal microbes have more to do with diabetes and inflammation than anyone thought. I'm considering buying some blueberry pomace/power and making a smoothie with it and some Certo (soluble pectin fiber) and see what happens with my metformin-induced diarrhea. Anybody want to place a bet on the result? "My fitness trajectory in my senior years does not have to be a continuous downward slope-- I do have some control over that." --Chrysalis Dx T2; 2005-2014: A1c 6.5-7.0% (ave 6.7) with 2000 mg/day metformin + 40 U/day Lantus. Jan 2015: A1c 7.8%. Reduce carbs, begin exercise, stop Lantus, stop metformin and start Victoza. A1c 6.2%-6.4% since Nov 2015. I have thought about this a lot, and there is likely a few things going on with this but I do think that gut microbia is one of them. Metformin does alter gut microbia for sure, and some of this has been shown to be ben Continue reading >>

What Can I Use To Slow The Diarrhea That Metformin Causes

What Can I Use To Slow The Diarrhea That Metformin Causes

what can i use to slow the diarrhea that metformin causes Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. what can i use to slow the diarrhea that metformin causes in my October 31st blood test my A1C went from 6.4 to 6.9 which average out to a daily average of 150. my doctor raised my dosage of metformin from one 500mg extended release pill taken after dinner to one 500mg extended release pill after lunch AND one after dinner. total 1000 mgs a day. since i started taking meformin back in may of this year. every other day i come down with very bad diarrhea. i go 5-6 times in an hour and very watery. i have very bad hemorrhoids,and they tend to break and there is a bit of blood on the tissue paper. this worries me greatly. somedays i feel i cant stop going i am told that some people who take this medication find some relief in the drug "immoduim AD" could you please tell me when you take this drug metformin what you do to manage the diarrhea? what medication helps you manage the effects of having diarrhea. In my experience the diarrhea will go away after about a month. One drug that is available here is imodium & it is very good for stopping it. In my experience the diarrhea will go away after about a month. One drug that is available here is imodium & it is very good for stopping it. I feel your pain. After a year and a 3 months, it is better for me. I use the Pink Stuff. When I was dx in May my endo put me on metformin er 1000 mg at breakfast and dinner, 1mg of glimepiride at breakfast. I had the same problems as you do now. After a month I told my endo and he change my dose to Metformin er 500mg at both breakfast and dinner and glimepiri Continue reading >>

Metformin Works With Gut Bacteria To Fight Diabetes

Metformin Works With Gut Bacteria To Fight Diabetes

Metformin Works With Gut Bacteria to Fight Diabetes Did you know that researchers don't know why one of the most popular drugs for diabetes works? It's true. All they know is that it does indeed work. This treatment that's eluded researchers' explanation for years is the medication metformin. Doctors use it to help people with type-2 diabetes control their blood sugar. It's been a treatment of choice for more than 60 years. But, believe it or not, no one really understood how or why it works. Until recently, that is. Researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden and the University of Girona in Spain have finally cracked it. You probably know by now that the bacteria that form the microbiomes in our guts affect nearly every aspect of our health. Type-2 diabetes is no different. And it seems that metformin affects the balance of these bacteria, helping to improve metabolism. Have These Deep-Sea Diving Grandmothers Found The Fountain Of Youth? They dive 65 feet underwater... hold their breath for minutes... and bring up treasures from the sea. And some of them are over 70 years old! For this study, the researchers transplanted gut microbiota from 22 patients before and after they received metformin to bacteria-free mice so they could study the effects of the medication. Their findings help explain why some people really benefit from metformin, while it doesn't make a difference for others individual variations in microbiomes are likely to blame. This also helps explain why some people suffer from diarrhea and abdominal pain when taking metformin. These findings suggest that a good probiotic, such as Advanced Probiotic Formula , could help people with type-2 diabetes manage the disease. A large percentage of individuals with high blood sugar or diabetes present with gastroi Continue reading >>

Probiotics And Diabetes: What Amazing New Research Reveals

Probiotics And Diabetes: What Amazing New Research Reveals

Diabetes is a dietary and digestive disorder. Clearly, it’s about elevated blood sugar levels. But hey, it’s also more than that. The food we eat feeds the bacteria in our gut. Eat too many carbs/processed foods and you feed the wrong bacteria. Often, diabetics get the disease by doing exactly that. Too much sugar simply translates into the overgrowth of bad bacteria (like yeast). So, it comes as no surprise that probiotics (good gut bacteria) and diabetes are closely linked. Direct Impact Of Probiotics On Diabetes Probiotics play a huge role in digestion. Many of us are ignorant about the importance and benefits of probiotics. Probiotics, or good gut bacteria, should ideally comprise at least 80% of the total gut bacteria. If you are diabetic, adding probiotics, as either food or supplements, can change things dramatically. Of course, you also need to eat the right diet to feed the right bacteria after that. Some of the best probiotics for diabetics modify disturbances in their metabolisms positively. There is strong scientific evidence supporting the fact that consuming probiotics helps decrease the serum cholesterol level and improves insulin sensitivity. RELATED: Meditation And Type 2 Diabetes Probiotics and Diabetes: The Science Behind It How does probiotics help diabetics? Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in correct dosages and form, give you a ton of health benefits. Probiotic supplements have been proven to have positive effects on cardio-metabolic parameters in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. According to research conducted at Loughborough University, probiotics prevent insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is often caused by consuming foods that contain trans fats for a long time. The study found that a high trans-fat and process Continue reading >>

If Metformin Causes Diarrhea, Will Kefir Help?

If Metformin Causes Diarrhea, Will Kefir Help?

One of the most useful-and widely used-medications for type 2 diabetes, metformin, is known to cause digestive distress for some of the people who take it. One reader found, however, that drinking the fermented milk beverage kefir could help alleviate the symptoms. Metformin and Diarrhea: Q. I have type 2 diabetes for which I take metformin. Unfortunately, this medicine gives me severe diarrhea. At times I have been afraid to leave the house. My doctor just shrugs and says diarrhea is a side effect of metformin. I have discovered that drinking kefir in the evening helps control the diarrhea. I don’t like the tart taste, but the drink has helped me a lot. It took about three weeks before it took effect and I got control of my bowels. A. Diarrhea can be a symptom of a serious metformin side effect, lactic acidosis. Ask your doctor to check for this complication. Why Might Kefir Help? Kefir is fermented milk. This provides probiotic bacteria that may help stabilize your intestinal flora and help control diarrhea (Rosa et al, Nutrition Research Reviews, June 2017). Kefir appears to provide a range of health benefits (Bourrie, Willing & Cotter, Frontiers in Microbiology, May 4, 2016). People with diabetes may also find that kefir can help lower blood sugar and HbA1c (a measure of blood sugar over time) (Tonucci et al, Clinical Nutrition, Feb. 2017). Even though the taste doesn’t please you, you’re smart to stick with plain kefir. Many of the flavored kefir products are sweetened, which might not be good for blood sugar control. Taking Care of Your Diabetes: We discuss the pros and cons of metformin along with many other strategies for blood sugar control in our Guide to Managing Diabetes. Everyone with diabetes needs to be monitoring blood sugar as well as managing any Continue reading >>

Probiotics And Prebiotics

Probiotics And Prebiotics

Parts of a Healthy Diet If you’re someone who likes to keep up with the latest in food and nutrition, you’ve undoubtedly heard or read about probiotics and prebiotics. You might know that they can aid digestion and reduce bloating, as touted in countless yogurt commercials on TV. But perhaps you didn’t know that they have numerous other potential health benefits. You might even be shocked to learn what probiotics really are: bacteria. Prebiotics, on the other hand, are the food that probiotics need to survive. While this knowledge might make some people squeamish at first, it is a necessary first step toward understanding the helpful role probiotics can play in the body. This article describes what probiotics and prebiotics are, how they can help you, and how they might in some cases be harmful — so that you can have a better idea whether adding them to your diet is right for you. Probiotics are our friends If the thought of bacteria coursing through your digestive system makes you squirm, take a deep breath and realize this: Some types of bacteria are good for us. We tend to hear much more about all of the harmful bacteria that can cause illness, such as Streptococcus pyogenes, which causes strep throat; or Escherichia coli, which can cause serious food poisoning. Often overlooked are all the good types of bacteria that help keep our bodies functioning properly and can even help ward off certain diseases. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines probiotics as “living organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.” Microorganisms include bacteria, viruses, and yeasts — organisms that can only be seen with a microscope. While some varieties of yeast may confer a health benefit, the most common probiotics are Continue reading >>

Metformin And Probiotics Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Metformin And Probiotics Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Metformin and Probiotics drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported among people who take Metformin and Probiotics together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Metformin and Probiotics. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 98 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 98 people who take Metformin, Probiotics are studied. Most common drug interactions over time *: Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit) Most common drug interactions by gender *: Cholelithiasis (the presence or formation of gallstones in the gallbladder or bile ducts) Haemorrhoidal haemorrhage (bleeding from the haemorrhoids) Pancytopenia (medical condition in which there is a reduction in the number of red and white blood cells, as well as platelets) Clostridium difficile colitis (inflammation of colon by clostridium difficile bacteria infection) Complex regional pain syndrome (long lasting pain condition most often affecting one of the limbs (arms, legs, hands, or feet)) Endometriosis (appearance of endometrial tissue outside the uterus and causing pelvic pain) Gastrooesophageal reflux disease (stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the oesophagus) Musculoskeletal stiffness (stiffness of the body's muscles, joints, tendons, ligaments and nerves) Glucose tolerance impaired (blood glucose is raised beyond normal levels, but not high enough to warrant a diabetes diagnosis) Leukocytosis (increased white blood cells) Mal Continue reading >>

Folate-producing Probiotics May Help With Gastrointestinal Side Effects Of Metformin

Folate-producing Probiotics May Help With Gastrointestinal Side Effects Of Metformin

New research suggest that specific probiotics formulated to stimulate the production of folate (also know as vitamin B9) in the colon might help alleviate metformin-associated gastrointestinal adverse effects. Gastrointestinal distress, which can manifest as stomach pain, bloating, gas, diarrhea or constipation, is one of the most common side effects of the type 2 diabetes drug metformin. It is thought that metformin can cause gastrointestinal problems by inducing an imbalance in gut bacteria. Specifically, metformin affects or reduces the limited number of bacteria able to produce folate. At the same time, metformin tends to decrease the absorption of folic acid, which is the synthetic form of folate that can be taken via pills or supplements. Therefore, metformin has not only an inhibitory effect on the production of folate in the colon but also reduces its bioavailability from other sources. Folate deficiency has been linked to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the occurence of gastrointestinal symptoms, including abdominal pain and diarrhea, especially after meals. Several probiotic strains of bacteria are able to produce folate. For example, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli-containing probiotics have been extensively studied for their capacity to produce this vitamin. In this new scientific research proposal, a researcher from Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, in Turkey, chose to focus on a probiotic bacteria called Intestinibacter Bartlettii, whose count is significantly lowered with metformin treatment. The idea of biochemist Adbullah Olgun is to engineer this bacteria so that it is resistant to metformin and a greater folate producer by means of complex procedures and genetic manipulations. Then, it could be made into a probiotic for metformin users. The preven Continue reading >>

Metformin And Probiotic Interaction | Treato

Metformin And Probiotic Interaction | Treato

Probiotic and Pain Metformin and PCOS Probiotic and Diarrhea Metformin and Diabetes Probiotic and Candida Metformin and Clomid Probiotic and Intestinal Flora Modifiers Metformin and Weight Loss Probiotic and Antibiotics Metformin and Insulin Resistance Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

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