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Best Popcorn For Diabetics

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Popcorn?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn can be a healthful snack for most people, depending on how it is prepared. With its fairly low calorie and high-fiber content, air popped popcorn is often a go-to snack for dieters. However, people with diabetes have more to worry about than their waistlines when snacking on popcorn. People with diabetes can eat popcorn but need to choose carefully the type of popcorn, how it is cooked, and how much they eat, due to popcorn's high carb content. Nutritional information Air-popped popcorn offers very few calories per cup. In addition, a cup of air-popped popcorn contains a little over 1 gram (g) in fiber. It also contains about 1 g of protein and about 6 g of carbohydrate. Additionally, popcorn contains zero cholesterol and is almost fat-free, far less than 0.5 g per cup. The total calories in a 5-cup serving are between 100-150. Popcorn qualifies as a whole-grain food. One serving can provide about 70 percent of the recommended daily intake of whole grain. Popcorn is full of vitamins and minerals. A single serving of popcorn contains a number of vitamins and minerals, including: vitamin A vitamin E vitamin B6 pantothenic acid thiamin niacin riboflavin A serving of popcorn also contains iron and trace amounts of manganese, calcium, phosphorus, copper, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. The popcorn's hull or shell is the source of much of its nutritional value. The shell contains beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin, which are important for maintaining eye health. The shell also contains polyphenols with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which may protect against cancer and cardiovascular disease. Researchers have stated that popcorn contains up to 300 milligrams of polyphenols per serving. This high amount of polyphenols is more than 60 percent of the am Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Pretzels Pretzels have a healthy image, but a glance at the ingredients list reveals that their wholesome reputation is grossly undeserved. Nearly every brand is made from the same basic ingredients: white flour (wheat flour that’s been stripped of its nutrients and fiber), yeast, salt, and maybe some vegetable oil or corn syrup. It’s obvious from its subpar ingredient list that this popular snack is pretty much devoid of nutrition. Pretzels are baked, not fried like potato chips, which saves you a few calories, but the white, refined carbs do a number on your blood sugar and do little to satisfy your appetite. Skip the carb-fest and opt for a more balanced and filling snack that includes some protein to help steady your sugars. Great choices include a rice cake with reduced-fat cheese, a handful of pistachio nuts in the shell, or a nonfat Greek yogurt. Looking for tips on how to manage diabetes? Give these lifestyle changes a shot. Continue reading >>

6 Safe & Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

6 Safe & Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

2. Homemade Popcorn Popcorn gets a bad reputation, but that’s not entirely fair. Yes, popcorn bought in bags at the grocery store or acquired at the local movie theater can be absolutely loaded with salt, fat, even sugar. But popcorn itself—save the various coatings—is actually very high in fiber and rather healthy. The key is to make your own popcorn from scratch. Most grocery stores carry popcorn kernels, which can be prepared by adding them to a covered pot placed on the stove top. Use a little oil to gently coat some of the kernels, but don’t overdo it. To keep things healthy, use canola or olive oil. 3. Apples and Cheese No one is exactly sure why they make such a good combination, but it’s hard to disagree that apples and cheese make for a great-tasting one-two punch. And it’s a healthy combo, too! While the apples provide loads of nutrients (like vitamins A and C) and fiber, the cheese is a great source of protein, which can keep us feeling full for hours. Of course, when it comes to cheese, portion control is important. Try to use low-fat cheddar instead of high-fat creamy cheeses like Camembert or brie. 4. Chips and Salsa It isn’t often that we recommend chips, but the whole-grain baked variety can actually be an excellent source of fiber. The trick, of course, is to load your chip with homemade salsa packed with fruits and vegetables. For an awesome salsa, slice, dice and add red and green peppers, tomatoes, black beans, avocado, cilantro, and garlic. To up the flavor even further, add some salt, lemon juice, black pepper and fresh chillies. 5. Black Bean Salad Vegetarians are often told to replace meat with black beans, which are high in both carbohydrates and protein. They’re also abounding with fiber, which can fend off hunger pangs and keep Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

Diabetes Resources: Healthy Snacks

Diabetes Resources: Healthy Snacks

Internet Resources The pediatric diabetes specialists at American Family Children's Hospital present these healthy snack ideas for our young patients. Snacks with 16-30 Grams of Carbohydrate One small banana with one tbsp. nut butter (25 grams) Two Eggo® Nutri Grain® whole wheat waffles topped with sugar-free syrup (27 grams) Three graham cracker squares with two tbsp. reduced fat strawberry cream cheese (21 grams) Nature Valley® Oats and Dark Chocolate Crunchy Granola Bar (28 grams) Five dried apricots (26 grams) Stonyfield Farms® fat-free yogurt (28 grams) Stonyfield Farms® six-ounce Yo Baby drinkable yogurt (23-25 grams) One Eggo® Nutri Grain® blueberry waffle (16 grams) Two fig, raspberry, or strawberry Newtons® (21 grams) One Thomas® whole wheat mini-bagel with one slice turkey and cheese (22 grams) 3/4 cup Kashi® Berry Blossoms cereal (25 grams); adding ½-cup lowfat milk will take the total to 30 grams 15 tortilla chips with ¼-cup salsa (28 grams) 16 Wheat Thins® with one slice cheese (22 grams) Fiber One® Chewy Strawberry PBJ Bar (20 grams) Kashi® cereal bar (23-24 grams) English muffin pizza: 1/2 English muffin, two tbsp. pizza sauce, two tbsp. cheese (17 grams) 100-calorie pack Chex® cheddar crackers (17 grams) ½ peanut butter or nut butter sandwich on whole wheat bread made with one tbsp. peanut butter (16 grams) Snacks with 15 Grams or Less of Carbohydrate 10 Quaker® cheddar cheese mini-rice cakes (11 grams) ½ ham, turkey, or cheese sandwich on whole wheat bread (13 grams) One small apple (15 grams) Four-ounce sugar-free pudding (14 grams) 100-calorie pack Goldfish Crackers® (14 grams) One Eggo® Nutri Grain® whole wheat waffle with one tbsp. nut butter (15 grams) Yoplait Go-gurt® (13 grams) One cup milk (12 grams) Glucerna® mini-snack Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Late Night Snack For A Diabetic?

What Is The Best Late Night Snack For A Diabetic?

There are lot many choices available for your request, but for now I’ll suggest one of them, that is POPCORN We all love popcorn, and fortunately popcorn has high nutritive value and highly beneficial as a food item only if we don;t ruin it with toppings such as sugar, salt, butter, caramel, etc. Plain air popped popcorn is the best choice for diabetics and it is recommended to have it as is. If at all you want to have some toppins (but only occasionally) you can add cinnamon, black pepper or red chilli powder (only a pinch of anyone of these). Other than this, plain air popped popcorn has low fat content, low sugar content, high dietary fibers, high fullness factor and low calories which makes it a very ideal snack to munch on. The ideal serving size, nutritional assessment and other discussions related to popcorn can be appreciated here: Thanks! Continue reading >>

30 Microwaveable Buttered Popcorns—ranked!

30 Microwaveable Buttered Popcorns—ranked!

Armed with a warm green tea and a blanket scarf draped around my shoulders, I went for a stroll around my neighborhood this weekend. Pools were being drained, restaurants were storing away their outdoor seating, and storefronts were already being ornamented with holiday-themed decor. And you know what that means: It's that time of year to curl up on the couch under a fuzzy blanket and finally work through your Netflix queue. So, once I returned home, that's exactly what I did. But before I got comfortable, I hurried over to the pantry to grab the perfect movie-night snack: buttery microwave popcorn. As a potent source of fiber and whole grains, popcorn is a hunger-quelling snack. Not to mention, a study by Penn State University researchers found that eating a large volume of food (like popcorn) can leave you significantly more satisfied than a smaller-portioned, higher-calorie snack (like a chocolate bar)—it's why eating more high-volume veggies is #36 of our 50 Ways to Lose 10 Pounds—Fast! But if you pop the wrong kernels, you could be doing your body more harm than good. Buttery kernels are often doused with a combination of inflammatory vegetable oils and artificial flavors. Manufacturers then extend the popcorn's shelf life by adding petroleum-derived antioxidant tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ). This corrosion inhibitor is commonly used in biodiesel, and the FDA allows it in your food as a preservative. (Something tells us watching the Rush Hour series while noshing on butane-drenched munchies would be fairly unsettling.) The good news? If you follow our guide, you can still enjoy microwave popcorn without the lingering notion that you're noshing on lighter fluid. Pick up a bag of our Eat This-approved choices and leave the Not That's on the shelf. Curious abo Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Popcorn If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Popcorn If I Have Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

Figuring out the right snack foods in between meals is hard enough for most people, but what if you're one of the 18.8 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with diabetes? The options may seem even more limited. That's why we've put together a list of 15 diabetic-friendly snacking options based on advice from a few experts. Click here to see the 15 Best Snack Foods for Diabetics Slideshow Lori Kenyon is a certified nutritional consultant, personal trainer, and co-founder of Ritual Cleanse. She was diagnosed early on in her life with a disorder that prevented her from consuming animal protein and has since had to adapt her diet to compensate. Kenyon advises clients to consume snacks which contain no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates and 140 milligrams of sodium per serving, in accordance with American Diabetes Association guidelines. Stella Metsovas is a certified clinical nutritionist who specializes in food science and human nutrition, with more than 23 years of experience in the field. She is a strong believer in the Paleo-Mediterranean diet and runs a private practice in Los Angeles. Angela Shelf Medearis is the author of The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook and has been featured frequently on The Dr. Oz Show as a guest chef, where she is known simply as The Kitchen Diva. She offers some great general snacking advice from her cookbook: Portion sizes are key. Keeping the glycemic load down (a measurement of how much food spikes blood glucose levels) means cutting down on portion sizes, since the measurement accounts for the number of grams of carbohydrates per serving of a food item, which of course will increase with portion sizes. Eating huge portions of even healthy snacks can quickly turn them unhealthy. Snacks between meals can help you re Continue reading >>

10 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snacks

10 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snacks

Any of you with kids know that the amount of requests kids make for a snack in a day is astronomical. Having both of my kids at home all summer long, many days it seems like my day consists of: make breakfast, clean up the kitchen, give the kids a snack, make lunch, clean up the kitchen, make a snack, make dinner, clean up the kitchen, fall into bed. Ok, I am exaggerating, but you get the point. Kids eat…A LOT! I always try to provide my kids with healthy snack options. I also like to keep snacks lower carb, so that my son’s blood sugar doesn’t peak too much in between meals, and so that it has time to stabilize before beginning another meal. I thought I would share a few ideas of what snack time looks like at our house, by giving you 10 sample snacks. In most, there is more than one snack idea. Exact carbohydrate calculations will vary, but I will give you the rough estimates of the food pictured. Freeze-Dried Fruit & Popcorn: My kids love freeze-dried fruit, and I love it because it is great to have on hand once our favorite seasonal fruits are no longer in season. I buy the single-serving bags and it makes for a great snack and/or addition to meals. Popcorn is a snack-time favorite at our household as well because it is so low carb. For 1 bag of freeze-dried fruit (containing blueberries, raspberries & strawberries), there are 10 g of carbs and 3 g of fiber. Total NET CARBS are 7 g. 1 cup of popcorn contains approximately 3 g of carbs and .5 g of fiber. Total NET CARBS are 2.5 g. Frutas secas y palomitas de maíz 1 bolsa de frutas secas congeladas (con arándanos, frambuesas y fresas), contiene 10 g de carbohidratos y 3 g de fibra. Total de carbohidratos: 7 g. 1 Taza de palomitas de maíz contiene aproximadamente 3 g de carbohidratos y 5 g de fibra. Total de ca Continue reading >>

10 Easy Snacks For Diabetes

10 Easy Snacks For Diabetes

Thinkstock Stay Fueled With These Diabetes Snacks Snacks aren't just an excuse to munch on something mid-day — they are an important part of a type 2 diabetes diet to help manage weight and control blood sugar. "Eating frequently throughout the day allows you to better regulate your appetite and avoid excess hunger, which can lead to overeating and elevated blood sugar levels," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, and author of The 2-Day Diabetes Diet. Palinski-Wade has three recommendations for good diabetes snacks: Stick to between 15 and 45 grams of carbohydrates per diabetes snack, choose 100 percent whole grains, and eat whole fruits instead of fruit juice. Also be sure you eat every 4 to 6 hours, suggests Jessica Crandall, RD, CDE, a national spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "If it's going to be a longer time before you eat a meal or if you feel your blood sugar dropping, eat a snack," she says. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn

Popcorn can be a healthy snack depending upon how it’s prepared, and it is also one of little snacking pleasures of life. After all, who can imagine gonna see a flick with no stopping by shop for a small bucket? A lot of people love to eat popcorn at the movies. However people with diabetes have to try to avoid these highly buttery and salted versions. Don’t worry, popcorn can easily still be properly incorporated into your diabetic diet. It is a good snack for a diabetic, however the preparation and the type of corn impact its value. Popcorn is considered a important source of the whole-grain fiber in its unprocessed form, making it perfect for people concerned about diabetes and blood sugar. It is so fluffy and light. In addition, it comes with a quite low glycemic load compared to other traditional snack foods, hence as long as you consume popcorn in moderation, it can be a health addition to your eating plan. According to the ADA, the portion size of popcorn for a diabetic equals about 15 grams of carbs, or three cups of popped popcorn. As a diabetic could consume between 15 to 30 grams of carbs for snacks, no more than six cups of popcorn should be ate at once. One ounce bags of the microwave popcorn have about 21g of carb, making the portions idea for one diabetic. Also read: How I Finally Cured My Diabetes Nutritional Content of Popcorn By comparison, foods that are high in fiber usually reflect a whole grain source of carb, which is a more complex form that is more slowly absorbed and digested. Like any other whole grain source of carbs, unprocessed and air-popped popcorn is a good source of nutrients for people with diabetes. In fact, a lot of “light” popcorns have 80 to 100 calories as well as 3 grams of fiber a serving. Popcorn doesn’t affect blood Continue reading >>

The Best Snacks To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best Snacks To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most debilitating diseases, inflicting an estimated 415 million people worldwide. It greatly affects your ability to enjoy many different kinds of foods, not to mention you can’t eat anything containing sugar. So what does a diabetic person snack on, keeping in mind that almost all packaged snacks are high in ‘bad sugar’ content? It’s imperative for a diabetic to keep their blood sugar levels in check and eat a balanced diet. It’s important to prepare healthy and balanced snacks in addition to the 3 big meals of the day because you have to keep your glucose levels in line. Reaching for a candy bar or a pack of chips instead of a healthy salad or smoothie will make your glucose and sugar levels fluctuate and effectively send you to the hospital. The following is a compilation of the healthiest and tastiest snacks for diabetics from around the world. They will be sure to suit every palette because they are packed with good sugar, protein and fiber that will keep your blood sugar levels in check and you healthy: Homemade Popcorn – Store bought popcorn, in one of those microwavable bags, is full of additives and artificial flavoring that is extremely bad for you. Make your own popcorn by mixing one tablespoon (14 grams) of Canola Oil and ½ cup (75 grams) of popcorn kernels in a pan with a lid. According to Health magazine, if you crave a little more flavor in your homemade popcorn, add a pinch of salt, garlic powder or a little parmesan cheese. Protein Rich Smoothies – Smoothies are a perfect combination of the best of fruits and vegetables. Just one glass could give you the recommended serving of everything healthy. Incorporating some forms of protein in smoothies will make them extra healthy and filling. WebMD suggests adding protein Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Can Diabetics Eat Popcorn?

Popcorn is one of life's little snacking pleasures -- after all, who could imagine going to see a flick without stopping by the snack counter for a small bucket? While people with diabetes should try to avoid the highly salted and buttery versions, popcorn can still be safely incorporated into the diabetic diet. Popcorn has high fiber and a low glycemic load compared to many other snack foods, so as long as it is consumed in moderation it makes a healthy addition to the diabetic diet. Nutritional Content of Popcorn Like any whole grain source of carbohydrate, air-popped and unprocessed popcorn is an excellent source of nutrients for individuals with diabetes. Most "light" popcorns contain 80 to 100 calories and 3 grams of fiber per serving. Because it is made from corn, which is a whole grain, popcorn does not impact blood sugar levels as dramatically as other sugary snack foods. In fact, one serving of popcorn has a glycemic load that is 2 to 4 times lower than other snack foods, such as raisins, graham crackers, or potato chips. The Diabetic Portion Size of Popcorn According to the American Diabetes Association, one diabetic portion size of popcorn equals 3 cups of popped popcorn, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. Because individuals with diabetes can consume between 15 and 30 grams of carbohydrate for snacks, no more than two servings or 6 cups of popcorn should be consumed at one time. Most individual, 1 ounce bags of microwave popcorn bags contain approximately 21 grams of carbohydrate, making these portions perfect for individuals with diabetes. Choosing the Right Popcorn Individuals with diabetes must be mindful of the type of popcorn they consume because many versions have added fats, sugars and salts. When selecting popcorn at the grocery store, indiv Continue reading >>

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