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Best Milk For Diabetics To Drink

What’s The Best Type Of Milk For You?

What’s The Best Type Of Milk For You?

Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. Jewels is the moderator of Diabetic Connect’s weekly #DCDE Twitter chat, and she and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. “Just because something is called 'milk' does not mean it’s nutritious,” warns Dr. David Katz, a nutrition expert from the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center. If you’ve taken a look beyond dairy lately, “milk” options abound, often leaving consumers wondering what’s best for their health. The milk controversy: do we need milk? Dairy milk is certainly full of protein, but most people in the United States aren’t lacking protein in their diets. “Rather than acknowledge that they get along just fine without it, many seek out ‘milk’ substitutes, like soymilk, around which whole industries have been built,” according to Aaron E. Carroll, MD, in the New York Times. Dr. Carroll, professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine, finds there’s “nothing wrong with a periodic glass because you like it,” but he argues that “there’s also very little evidence that it’s doing them much good.” The USDA may recommend three cups per day, even for adults, but that’s a controversial suggestion. We’re told calcium strengthens our bones, but studies show the calcium in milk may not be providing that for us, regardless of the dairy industry’s claims. Nutrients “Milks” are now being made from grains, nuts and seeds—a huge change from the past when dairy milk was king—giving those with allergies, lactose intolerance, and other diet restrictions a slew of other options to choose from. Dairy milk isn’t without its benefits. It’s chock-full of vitamins D and K, protein Continue reading >>

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

Which Milk Is Best For Diabetics?

A cold glass of milk invigorates your taste buds and gives you a boost of calcium, but people with diabetes need to be selective with their milk choices. Milk provides important nutrients for bone health, but some varieties contain large amounts of saturated fat and sugar, which should be limited in a diabetic diet. Video of the Day Milk on a Diabetic Diet According to ''Diabetes Forecast,'' a publication from the American Diabetes Association, diabetes increases your chance of developing bone fractures, a risk that increases as you age and lose bone mass. Calcium-rich foods, such as milk, help keep your bones strong and protect against osteoporosis, a serious bone loss that can lead to broken bones and decreased mobility. Since milk contains lactose, a type of sugar, it needs to be counted toward your daily carbohydrate totals. The American Diabetes Association’s nutrition plan recommends 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, which includes one serving of dairy. Eight ounces of milk count as one dairy serving. Skim and Low-fat Milk Diabetes increases your risk of heart disease, but you can control your risk by limiting your intake of saturated fat. One cup of whole milk provides 149 calories and 5 grams of saturated fat, but 1 cup of skim milk contains only 83 calories and 0.1 gram of saturated fat. If you prefer milk with a thicker texture than skim milk, try 1 percent milk, which has 102 calories and 1.5 grams of saturated fat per cup. All plain milk varieties provide about 12 grams of sugar per cup, but chocolate, strawberry and vanilla milk contain added sugar, so read the food label before purchasing. Benefits of Soy Milk If you do not like regular milk or are lactose intolerant, soy milk makes a healthy alternative. One cup of regular soy milk provides 131 Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

Many people have childhood memories of parents urging them to drink lots of milk. When you’re a child, you typically have to drink whatever milk your parents provided for you. It may have been a more traditional option such as whole milk or a sweet alternative such as almond milk. Now that you’re the one doing the choosing, you can pick the best type of milk for you. If you have diabetes, you should know that not all types of milk are beneficial for you. Although you need the nutritious calcium and protein found in milk, it’s important to note the saturated fats, carbohydrates, and sugar levels in each. This information will help you pick the best milk for your dietary needs. People with diabetes are not able to make, or use, insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar. When insulin isn’t doing its job efficiently, blood sugar levels can spike. There are two kinds of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. No matter which type you have, managing your sugar intake is important. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, which is why carb counting is often recommended for people with diabetes. People with diabetes may also have high cholesterol or triglycerides in their blood. Triglycerides are a type of fat, which can increase the risk for a heart attack. Keeping an eye on the saturated and trans fat content in your diet is important. Diabetes can also make some people more susceptible to bone fractures. A diet high in calcium can help keep bones strong. One way to do this is by drinking milk daily. Adding calcium-rich milk into your diet may take a bit of planning. Creating a meal plan specifically designed for people with diabetes can be a good place to start. The American Diabetes Association recommends several meal plans geared toward keeping blood s Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

Milk Products And Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

Milk Products And Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

The relationship between milk product consumption and type 2 diabetes has been examined in several meta-analyses. Evidence to date suggests that milk product consumption is associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Highlights Milk product consumption is associated with a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes; Total dairy and low-fat milk products are largely associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes; High-fat dairy/dairy fat is either not associated or inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; Fermented dairy, including cheese and yogurt, is either not associated or inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; There appears to be an inverse dose-response relationship between yogurt and cheese and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Synopsis Several meta-analyses of numerous prospective cohort studies have examined the role of milk products in the development of type 2 diabetes. The totality of the evidence to date suggests that there is an inverse association between milk product consumption, including specific milk products such as yogurt and cheese, and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Evidence A meta-analysis published in 2014 investigated the association between the consumption of different types of dairy products and the risk of type 2 diabetes. The analysis consisted of data from 14 prospective cohort studies (N = 459,790), including the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, the Nurses’ Health Study and the Nurses’ Health Study II.1 Total, high-fat and low-fat dairy intake were not associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; Yogurt consumption (both plain and flavoured) was associated with an 18% decreased risk of type 2 diabetes (pooled relative risk of 0.82 per one serving of yogurt/day, 95% CI: Continue reading >>

Can Unsweetened Almond Milk Help To Lower Blood Glucose?

Can Unsweetened Almond Milk Help To Lower Blood Glucose?

Keeping blood glucose -- or blood sugar -- levels in check means leading a healthy lifestyle, controlling your carb intake and taking medications if your doctor recommends them. Though your body does require carbs daily to function properly, excess carbohydrate consumption can cause spikes in blood sugar. Drinking unsweetened almond milk instead of higher-carb beverages won’t increase your blood sugar as much. Choosing unsweetened almond milk over cow’s milk, sweetened almond milk or regular soy milk can help minimize blood sugar increases. This is because unsweetened almond milk contains less than 1 gram of carbohydrates per cup and will cause little -- if any -- increase in blood sugar. This would be beneficial for people with diabetes, or prediabetes, and anyone who wants to control overall carbohydrate intake to keep blood sugar levels under control. Benefits of Almond Milk Unsweetened almond milk is a low-calorie beverage rich in heart-healthy fats. A cup contains just 30 calories, making it beneficial when you’re trying to shed pounds. In comparison, 1 cup of skim milk contains about 85 calories and 12 grams of carbs, and a cup of unsweetened soy milk provides about 80 calories and 3 grams of carbohydrates. Many types of unsweetened almond milk are fortified with essential vitamins and minerals, such as calcium, zinc, riboflavin and vitamins A, D, B-12 and E. Potential Drawbacks The unsweetened version of almond milk lacks the protein found in cow's and soy milks. While skim and soy milks often contain 7 to 8 grams of dietary protein, unsweetened almond milk provides just 1 gram. Furthermore, since carbohydrates are your body’s preferred source of energy and protein helps boost satiety, drinking unsweetened almond milk may not curb your hunger, unless pair Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

Best And Worst Drinks For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 Best and Worst Drinks for Type 2 Diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, you know it's important to watch what you eat — and the types of drinks you consume. Drinks that are high in carbohydrates and calories can affect both your weight and your blood sugar. "Generally speaking, you want your calories and carbs to come from whole foods, not from drinks," says Nessie Ferguson, RD, CDE, a nutritionist at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The best drinks have either zero or very few calories, and deciding on a beverage isn't really difficult. "When it comes right down to it, good beverage choices for type 2 diabetes are good choices for everyone," she says. Some good drinks for type 2 diabetes include: Water Fat-free or low-fat milk Black coffee Unsweetened tea (hot or iced) Flavored water (zero calories) or seltzer But sugary soda is one of the worst types of drinks for type 2 diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. The problems with soda include: Empty calories. Soft drinks are very high in sugar, have zero nutritional value, and are often used in place of healthy drinks such as milk. Cavities. The high sugar combined with the acid in soda dissolves tooth enamel, which increases the risk of cavities. Weight gain. Sugary sodas have about 10 teaspoons of sugar per 12-ounce can. Boosts risk of diabetes and risk of complications for those who have diabetes. Some people with type 2 diabetes continue to drink alcohol, but you should be aware that any alcohol consumption may result in dangerously low blood sugar levels for up to 24 hours. That’s why it’s important to check your blood sugar often and get your doctor's okay before you drink alcohol. People with diabetes should only consume alcohol if their diabetes is well controlled and should always wear a medical Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Drink Recommendations

Diabetes-friendly Drink Recommendations

Food and eating can be a stressful thing when you have diabetes. If you're living with type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes, meal times can be a cause of stress; but another source of worry is what to drink when you have diabetes. If you're controlling your diabetes and blood sugar by diet and exercise or with medications and insulin, you still need to be cautious of the food and drinks that enter your body. Living with type 1 diabetes myself, I know first hand how much one wrong drink choice can affect my blood sugar levels. A type 1 diabetic does not produce insulin themselves so they must inject insulin with each meal. Making sure what you consume including drinks in between meals is important. In fact, drinking just one sweetened drink a day can raise your risk of type 2 diabetes by 25 percent. People tend to think that fruit juice is a good choice, but with a high concentration of fructose, diabetics should only consume fruit in its whole form. When fruit is juiced it is stripped of all its fiber, and fiber is what helps to slow down the blood sugar spike. Consuming fruit juice will set you up for a roller coaster of blood sugar levels all day. Fruit juice should be reserved only when you're dealing with hypoglycemia - in this case you are drinking it to increase your already too low blood sugar. Read more about foods that naturally lower blood sugar levels Alcohol is another beverage that diabetics should be wary of. Alcohol is a contributing factor to hypoglycemia. You will first experience an increase in your blood sugar levels due to the sugar content, then a reactive drop in blood sugar, resulting in cravings, headaches, dizziness, fainting and more. Avoid alcohol altogether, or minimize to one low-sugar drink once or twice a week. I don't think I really hav Continue reading >>

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves. ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page. USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say? Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, wrote, “I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.” OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway? What milk is made of Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations. Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various mi Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Whole Milk For those with diabetes, a diet high in saturated fat can worsen insulin resistance. Keep whole milk out of the fridge, and pick up 1% (low-fat) or skim (non-fat) milk instead. Also, try your best to avoid other whole-milk dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, regular cheese and cream cheese; instead, choose their reduced-fat counterparts whenever possible Previous Next More Photos Bacon White Bread Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

Whether served with cereal or an afternoon snack, milk is a dairy product that's a common part of many people's diets. But for those with diabetes, milk's carbohydrate count can impact blood sugar. Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar or carbohydrate the body uses for energy. An 8-ounce serving of milk has 12 grams of carbohydrate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend eating between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. A standard glass of milk will then represent one-third to one-fourth of a recommended carbohydrate intake for a meal. While cow's milk offers calcium and taste benefits to those with diabetes, its impact on blood sugar may make other choices better ones. Milk nutrition facts for people with diabetes Many milk options can be found at the grocery store. These include varying percentages of cow's milk to rice milk to almond milk. Consider the nutrition facts for some of the following milk options (all serving sizes are for one cup, or 8 ounces, of milk): Calories: 149 Fat: 8 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 276 milligrams Calories: 91 Fat: 0.61 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 316 milligrams Calories: 39 Fat: 2.88 grams Carbohydrate: 1.52 grams Protein: 1.55 grams Calcium: 516 milligrams Calories: 113 Fat: 2.33 grams Carbohydrate: 22 grams Protein: 0.67 grams Calcium: 283 milligrams While these aren't the only milk options for those with diabetes, they show how there are many different types of milk. Each milk type has its own qualities, from more to less calcium and more to fewer carbohydrates. For example, almond milk has nearly zero carbohydrates while both whole and skim milk have 12 grams of carbohydrates. Some varieties of almond milk also have more calcium per cup than dairy milk does. So Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Drink Milk

Can Diabetics Drink Milk

When it comes to certain foods, there are always questions as to whether or not a diabetic can have them without causing significant fluctuations in glucose levels. One such food item is milk. So the question remains: is it safe for diabetics? Actually, milk is fine for diabetics, as long as they use the moderation rule. However, they do need to consider how it can affect their blood sugar. It is best if the milk is low fat so that it causes that much less of a surge in sugar. Whole milk is not a good idea, though, due to the high levels of both glucose and lactose. For those who enjoy milk but may have an apprehension to drinking it there are other alternatives. You can try soy or rice milk. These offer virtually the same flavor as cow's milk but with some added nutritional features. These milks are also low in fat, which is one of the features of cow's milk that is not favorable. Plus, alternative milk options takes care of the problem that some have with lactose. Diabetics also have to be leery of other products that contain milk. For instance, cheese, yogurt, sour cream, ice cream, and certain creams and sauces used in cooking. It is not only necessary to watch out for these as it relates to milk, but also fat and calorie content, as well. In the end, milk is safe for diabetics as long as it is consumed in small quantities and using low fat or fat free, as long as fat and calorie content is heeded. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways. As its alternate name of adult-onset diabetes implies, it is usually only found in adults. However, the rate of children acquiring the disease is going up. Type 2 diabetes is also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes due to the fact that, unlike type 1, insulin injections are not always required for treatm Continue reading >>

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