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Best Glucose Meter For Hypoglycemia

Comparative Accuracy Of 17 Point-of-care Glucose Meters

Comparative Accuracy Of 17 Point-of-care Glucose Meters

Comparative Accuracy of 17 Point-of-Care Glucose Meters 1Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Research Center, Boston, MA, USA Steven J. Russell, MD, PhD, Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Research Center, 50 Staniford St, Ste 301, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Email: [email protected] Copyright 2016 Diabetes Technology Society The accuracy of point-of-care blood glucose (BG) meters is important for the detection of dysglycemia, calculation of insulin doses, and the calibration of continuous glucose monitors. The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of commercially available glucose meters in a challenging laboratory study using samples with a wide range of reference BG and hemoglobin values. Fresh, discarded blood samples from a hospital STAT laboratory were either used without modification, spiked with a glucose solution, or incubated at 37C to produce 347 samples with an even distribution across reference BG levels from 20 to 440 mg/dl and hemoglobin values from 9 to 16 g/dl. We measured the BG of each sample with 17 different commercially available glucose meters and the reference method (YSI 2300) at the same time. We determined the mean absolute relative difference (MARD) for each glucose meter, overall and stratified by reference BG and by hemoglobin level. The accuracy of different meters widely, exhibiting a range of MARDs from 5.6% to 20.8%. Accuracy was lower in the hypoglycemic range, but was not consistently lower in samples with anemic blood hemoglobin levels. The accuracy of commercially available glucose meters varies widely. Although the sample mix in this study was much more challenging than those that would be collected under most use conditions, some meters were robust to these challenges and exhibited high accuracy in this Continue reading >>

Best Glucometers

Best Glucometers

Compact, easy-to-use glucometers are the norm When it comes to blood glucose meters, fewer steps mean fewer mistakes. So the best glucose meters are those that make the basic process of testing your blood sure as foolproof as possible: Insert test strip, prick finger, apply blood, read result. The tiny FreeStyle Lite (Est. $25) home glucose monitor -- itself no bigger than a pack of gum -- goes one step further by requiring only 0.3 microliters of blood for each sample. Users love the small sample size, which they say makes the testing process much less painful and intimidating. They also appreciate that the meter beeps once you've added enough blood and that if you don't get enough blood onto the test strip with your first try, you have up to 60 seconds to add more blood. There's also no need for manual coding when you open a new set of test strips, which helps cut down on possible errors. Even more important than its comfort and user-friendly features, the FreeStyle Lite receives some of the best scores for accuracy and repeatability in clinical trials and from a leading consumer research organization. And although this isn't the newest meter on the block, users still love it for its reliability. Other features that make the FreeStyle Lite so popular with users include its simple three-button operation, a backlit screen and illuminated test strip port for discreet testing in the dark, and the ability to store up to 400 readings and calculate averages that show blood glucose trends over time. The FreeStyle Lite also has a data port that lets you download your readings into a Windows or OS X computer using FreeStyle's Auto-Assist desktop program. The program compiles several types of reports including meter settings, meal event averages, daily statistics and a snapshot Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Ways To Test Your Blood Sugar

Everyone with diabetes should test their blood sugar (glucose) levels regularly. Knowing the results lets you tweak your strategy for keeping the disease in check, as needed. Regular testing can also help you avoid getting long-term health problems that can stem from the condition. Research shows that in people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, sticking to your target blood sugar and HbA1c levels makes complications less likely. 1. Traditional Home Glucose Monitoring You prick your finger with a lancet (a small, sharp needle), put a drop of blood on a test strip, and then place the strip into a meter that displays your blood sugar levels. Meters vary in features, portability, speed, size, cost, and readability (with larger displays or spoken instructions if you have vision problems). Devices deliver results in less than 15 seconds and store this information for future use. Some meters also calculate an average blood sugar level over a span of time. Some also feature software kits that take information from the meter and display graphs and charts of your past test results. Blood sugar meters and strips are available at your local pharmacy. 2. Meters That Test Other Parts of Your Body. Some devices let you test you upper arm, forearm, base of the thumb, and thigh. These results may differ from the blood sugar levels gotten from a fingertip stick. Levels in the fingertips show changes more quickly. This is especially true when your sugar is changing fast, like after a meal or after exercise. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar, don’t rely on test results from other parts of your body. 3. Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Some of these devices are combined with insulin pumps. They're not as accurate as finger-stick glucose results. But they can help you find p Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Controlling your blood sugar, or blood glucose, level is key to managing diabetes. Accurate test results help people with diabetes adjust their diet, exercise routine, and treatment plan—which might help prevent complications and reduce the risk of seizures, kidney disease, nerve damage, and blindness. Anyone with diabetes can benefit from testing. Blood glucose monitoring can be important for those taking insulin or other diabetes medications, women with gestational diabetes (diagnosed during pregnancy), and those having difficulty controlling their diabetes. Today's blood glucose meters are smaller, faster, more accurate than older models, and come with more features. We tested dozens of models priced between $10 and $75. Use our guide to help you find the best monitor for your needs. All glucose monitors work in a similar way, but some have features and options that might better suit your specific needs. Talk with your doctor or diabetes educator about which monitor matches monitoring requirements lifestyle, and budget. Cost Don't just look at the retail price of the meters alone. What makes blood glucose monitoring expensive is the test strips, which you might use many times a day. At $18 to $184 per 100 test strips, the cost can add up to about $265 to $2,685 a year for people who test four times a day. Replacement lancets are another expense to consider. Insurance Medicare covers some diabetes-related supplies, and private insurance might cover some of the cost. See if there are certain brands of meters and test strips that insurance covers. Find out how many test strips, if any, are covered per month. Your strip coverage may depend, for example, on whether you use insulin. Automatic Coding Blood glucose meters need to be calibrated to each batch of test strips. Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Meters 2019 - Reviews Of Blood-sugar Monitors | Top Ten Reviews

Best Blood Glucose Meters 2019 - Reviews Of Blood-sugar Monitors | Top Ten Reviews

An accurate glucometer is a helpful tool for anyone with diabetes. It monitors the glucose level in blood, otherwise known as blood sugar, and helps you react to high or low levels, either of which can be dangerous. Best for Insulin Dependent Diabetics: FORA 6 Connect The FORA 6 Connect is the newest glucometer from ForaCare, and it's the best meter the company has put out to date. This is among the few meters on the market that test for both blood glucose levels and ketone levels. VIEW DEAL ON Fora Care The best glucose meters for use at homeare determined by a variety of factors, such as accuracy, data management and storage, glucose test strips and on-going cost. This list of the best glucometers available to buy right now covers all these factors and helps you find the right one for your needs. In our latest glucometers group test we reviewed 12 of the best on the market, however; this advice is not a replacement for consulting your doctor, who will be able to give you more detailed guidance around normal and high blood sugar levels. Top Ten Reviews has been reviewing glucometers for more than five years. We know firsthand the important role glucometers play in helping diabetics better manage their diets and keep their glucose levels from getting out of control. A bad glucometer can profoundly affect your life, which is why we emphasize the need to talk to your doctor about what type of glucometer is best for you. Don't just take our word for it. Before a blood glucose meter reaches the market, it must receive FDA approval. The process involves manufacturers submitting reports to the FDA showing the glucometer's accuracy is within 15 percent of lab-tested glucose levels in 95 percent of the readings, and within 20 percent in 99 percent of the readings. Unfortunatel Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

Our Process We spent over 80 hours researching the best 30 glucometers on the market. We considered the specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology, like coding, or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the best 12 blood glucose meters so we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it’s important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they’re not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. $19.99 The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature – Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason why the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the availability of its test strips – they are everywhere. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside to the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they’re more expensive than most test strips on the market. Best Glucometer for Value & Availability $13.95 The CONTOUR NEXT is our pick for the best glucometer if your primary concerns are overall value and the availability o Continue reading >>

The Accuracy Of Home Glucose Meters In Hypoglycemia.

The Accuracy Of Home Glucose Meters In Hypoglycemia.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Home glucose meters (HGMs) may not be accurate enough to sense hypoglycemia. We evaluated the accuracy and the capillary and venous comparability of five different HGMs (Optium Xceed [Abbott Diabetes Care, Alameda, CA, USA], Contour TS [Bayer Diabetes Care, Basel, Switzerland], Accu-Chek Go [Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland], OneTouch Select [Lifescan, Milpitas, CA, USA], and EZ Smart [Tyson Bioresearch Inc., Chu-Nan, Taiwan]) in an adult population. METHODS: The insulin hypoglycemia test was performed to 59 subjects (56 males; 23.6 +/- 3.2 years old). Glucose was measured from forearm venous blood and finger capillary samples both before and after regular insulin (0.1 U/kg) was injected. Venous samples were analyzed in the reference laboratory by the hexokinase method. In vitro tests for method comparison and precision analyses were also performed by spiking the glucose-depleted venous blood. RESULTS: All HGMs failed to sense hypoglycemia to some extend. EZ Smart was significantly inferior in critical error Zone D, and OneTouch Select was significantly inferior in the clinically unimportant error Zone B. Accu-Chek Go, Optium Xceed, and Contour TS had similar performances and were significantly better than the other two HGMs according to error grid analysis or International Organization for Standardization criteria. The in vitro tests were consistent with the above clinical data. The capillary and venous consistencies of Accu-Chek Go and OneTouch Select were better than the other HGMs. CONCLUSIONS: The present results show that not all the HGMs are accurate enough in low blood glucose levels. The patients and the caregivers should be aware of these restrictions of the HGMs and give more credit to the symptoms of hypoglycemia than the values obtained b Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia | Accu-chek

Hypoglycemia | Accu-chek

Hypoglycemia (or low blood sugar) occurs when blood glucose levels fall below 4 mmol/L. At first, symptoms may be benignirritability, mild nauseabut if the situation is not addressed, hypoglycemia can lead to fainting or even coma. Some of the symptoms, termed adrenergic, are due to adrenaline being secreted: Other symptoms, termed neuroglycipenic, are due to a lack of glucose in the brain: Difficulty coordinating your movements and focusing When it occurs at night, hypoglycemia can manifest through strong perspiration and restless sleep. You may also experience headaches when you wake up. Psychological or physical stress, alcohol, dietary choices, physical activity or certain medications can cause your blood sugar level to drop. So can taking too large a dose of insulin compared to what you ate or drankfor example, if you skipped a meal or snacked later than usual. Its a good idea to note what you ate or drank and what activities you performed before a bout of hypoglycemia. Note that people taking insulin or a medication that increases insulin production by the pancreas are at higher risk of hypoglycemia. Eat regularly, and always have a snack or source of sugar with you. Keep your glucose meter with you, and measure your blood sugar often, especially before and after meals or before and after physical activity. Adjust your insulin dose based on what you ate or drank and depending on your activities. Make sure those around you can recognize the signs of hypoglycemia. Wear something, such as a bracelet, to indicate that you are diabetic. The purpose of this hormone, which is produced by the pancreas, is to increase blood sugar levels. A person being treated with insulin who experiences an episode of severe hypoglycemia may require an injection of glucagon. If your doct Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Meters Of 2018

Best Blood Glucose Meters Of 2018

Consumer Reports shows you which devices will give you the most consistently accurate results We respect your privacy . All email addresses you provide will be used just for sending this story. More than 30 million Americans have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, according to a 2017 study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If that includes you, then controlling your blood sugar, or glucose, level is key. Eating a healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise can help. And for some, regularly monitoring their blood sugar at home can also help them control it. Using a home blood glucose meter can help you understand what makes your blood sugar rise or drop, and see how your numbers respond to medication you may be taking for your diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) . Go to Consumer Reports' 2018 Holiday Central for updates on deals, expert product reviews, insider tips on shopping, and much more. Blood Glucose Meter Ratings & Buying Guide Who should monitor at home? If you use insulin for type 1 diabetes, the ADA recommends regularly checking your levels with a home blood glucose meter. If you use insulin or other medication for type 2 diabetes, the association says you might benefit from monitoring at home. So talk with your doctor about whether you should consider getting a device. But for people with type 2 diabetes who dont take insulin or any medication that could cause blood sugar to fall too low, such as metformin (Glumetza and others, and generic), regular at-home blood sugar checks probably aren't useful, according to the American Academy of Family Physicians . If you're a good candidate for monitoring, your doctor can discuss with you how often you should do so (for some people, it may be several times per day, such as around Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Blood Sugar Monitoring: When To Check And Why

Managing diabetes is one part investigation and two parts action. Unlike some other diseases that rely primarily on professional medical treatment, diabetes treatment requires active participation by the person who has it. Monitoring your blood sugar level on a regular basis and analyzing the results is believed by many to be a crucial part of the treatment equation. When someone is first diagnosed with diabetes, he is usually given a blood sugar meter (or told to go buy one) and told how and when to use it, as well as what numbers to shoot for. However, the advice a person receives on when to monitor and what the results should be generally depend on his type of diabetes, age, and state of overall health. It can also depend on a health-care provider’s philosophy of care and which set of diabetes care guidelines he follows. At least three major health organizations have published slightly different recommendations regarding goals for blood sugar levels. There is some common ground when it comes to blood sugar monitoring practices. For example, most people take a fasting reading before breakfast every morning. Some people also monitor before lunch, dinner, and bedtime; some monitor after each meal; and some monitor both before and after all meals. However, when monitoring after meals, some people do it two hours after the first bite of the meal, while others prefer to check one hour after the start of a meal. To help sort out the whys and when of monitoring, three diabetes experts weigh in with their opinions. While they don’t agree on all the details, they do agree on one thing: Regular monitoring is critical in diabetes care. Why monitor? Self-monitoring is an integral part of diabetes management because it puts you in charge. Regardless of how you manage your diab Continue reading >>

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

Chris Hannemann, a 32-year-old product engineer in San Diego, California, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 8. For the past 24 years, multiple times a day, every day, he’s pricked his finger and used a blood glucose meter to measure the amount of sugar in his blood and decide whether to administer either insulin or a snack.The meter Hannemann uses regularly sometimes gives him readings that suggest his blood sugar levels are normal, even when he feels woozy or loses fine motor control (early effects of low blood sugar levels). “As someone who’s been comatose multiple times [due to other diabetic issues],” he told us, “it’s not fun.” During a doctor’s visit, Hannemann noticed that his glucose levels in lab tests seemed different than the measurements he would take himself. He suspected that his blood glucose meter was giving him inaccurate readings. To prove his theory, he ran a series of tests on 10 different meters. Hannemann found that readings from different meters varied from each other by as much as 60 percent, even though they were analyzing the same drop of blood, and varied 30 percent on average from each other. He published his findings in a Medium post. This discovery frustrated him because there’s so little information on glucose meter accuracy. “As a patient, you have no knowledge of this,” he said. Now, if he is using the inaccurate meter, he mentally calculates the difference. “If I check my glucose and it reads 90, I have to remind myself, ‘Oh, you actually need to eat something before you go drive or run or something.’” Accuracy matters to people like Hannemann and the many patients like him. Twenty-one million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes, and another eight million have diabetes but don’t know Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

If your deductible reset on January 1, there are new programs to help you afford your insulin prescription| Learn more Throughout the day, depending on multiple different factors,blood sugar(also called blood glucose) levels will vary up or down. This is normal. If it varies within a certain range, you probably wont be able to tell. But if it goes below the healthy range and is not treated, it can get dangerous. Low blood sugar (also known as hypoglycemia) is when your blood sugar levels have fallen low enough that you need to take action to bring them back to yourtarget range. This is usually when your blood sugar is less than 70mg/dL. However, talk to your diabetes care team about your own blood sugartargets, and what level is too low for you. Low blood sugar may also be referred to as aninsulin reaction, orinsulinshock. Signs and symptoms of low blood sugar (happen quickly) Each person's reaction to low blood sugar is different. Learn your own signs and symptoms of when your blood sugar is low. Taking time to write these symptoms down may help you learn your own symptoms of when your blood sugar is low. From milder, more common indicators to most severe, signs and symptoms of low blood sugar include: Tingling or numbness in the lips, tongue, or cheeks The only sure way to know whether you are experiencing low blood sugar is to check your blood sugar, if possible. If you are experiencing symptoms and you are unable to check your blood sugar for any reason, treat the hypoglycemia. A lowblood sugar leveltriggers the release of epinephrine (adrenaline), the fight-or-flighthormone. Epinephrine is what can cause the symptoms of hypoglycemia such as thumping heart, sweating, tingling, and anxiety. If the blood sugar level continues to drop, the brain does not get enough gl Continue reading >>

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