diabetestalk.net

Best Eye Drops For Diabetics

What Treatments Are Available For Diabetic Eye Disease?

What Treatments Are Available For Diabetic Eye Disease?

The first step in any treatment for diabetic eye disease is to maintain blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood cholesterol levels as close to normal as possible. Treatment of diabetic macular edema (swelling or the accumulation of blood and fluids in the macula, the part of the retina that provides sharp central vision), has evolved a great deal in the last five to ten years, and is based on the severity of the edema. At present, there are three options: laser treatment Avastin, Lucentis, or Eylea injection intravitreal steroids: Kenalog, Ozurdex, and Iluvien Laser Treatment This technique is used by retinal surgeons to treat a number of eye conditions, one of which is diabetic eye disease. A beam of high-intensity light is directed into the eye to seal off leaking blood vessels and prevent additional blood and fluid from leaking into the vitreous, which is the jelly-like substance that fills the inside of the back part of the eye. The doctor administers eye drops to dilate (open up) the pupil and numb the eye before treatment begins. Because lasers cannot restore lost vision, it is critical to maintain regular comprehensive eye examinations so that treatment can be initiated as soon as diabetic eye changes are detected. There are two types of laser treatments for diabetic eye disease: Focal laser treatment, also called photocoagulation: The retina is treated to stop or slow the leakage of blood and fluid from abnormal blood vessels within the eye. Focal laser, however, can also destroy surrounding healthy retinal tissue as it seals the leakage from abnormal blood vessel growth; therefore, it is not used on blood vessels directly under the macula, the center of the retina. Scatter laser treatment, also called panretinal photocoagulation: The areas of the retina away f Continue reading >>

Dry Eyes With Diabetes Mellitus

Dry Eyes With Diabetes Mellitus

The metabolic disorder diabetes mellitus is one of the major public health problems of our time. Around eight million people in Germany suffer from diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy (changes in the retina due to diabetes) is a consequence of diabetes which affects the eye, often accompanied by dry eyes. Diabetes mellitus: when the blood sugar gets out of control Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder in which the body can no longer adequately regulate the blood sugar balance. Therefore, the blood sugar levels of diabetics fluctuate enormously. This has severe repercussions on the whole body, among other things on the eyes. The reason for the restricted regulation of blood sugar is the hormone insulin. Insulin is produced in the pancreas and ensures that the sugar, which goes into the blood from digesting food, is absorbed in the cells. The sugar is then stored in the cells as energy reserves and is released as required. Diabetics produce little or no insulin and in addition, the cells can often react a lot worse to insulin. They develop a resistance. The consequence: the sugar remains in the blood which, in the long run, leads to cell damage and changes in the blood vessels. People afflicted notice high blood sugar levels, for example through a constant urge to urinate and feeling very thirsty. The damage is irreparable and leads to serious consequences for organs and tissue. How strongly diabetes affects the body depends on how well blood sugar levels are managed and how long the disease persists. Diabetic retinopathy: severe changes to the retina due to diabetes Diabetic retinopathy is a disease of the retina and one of the most common causes of blindness in people between 20 and 65. In particular, the fine blood vessels, the capillaries, are affected by high Continue reading >>

Treating Dry Eyes In Diabetics

Treating Dry Eyes In Diabetics

Choosing the right kind of eye drops is essential to treat this problem. A diabetic has to deal with many different challenges and problems in their day-to-day life, and dry eyes is one of the most common ones. Everyday activities like reading and driving are significantly affected and the impact on a patient's quality of life is particularly notable. A noticeable decrease in production of tears by the tear gland or an excessive, unwarranted evaporation of tears leads to dry eyes. The tear film of people with dry eyes breaks up much faster between blinks compared to those without dry eyes. When the tear film breaks up between blinks, the surface of the eye is exposed and dry areas can occur and lead to dry eye symptoms. Experts say that eye drops are the mainstay of therapy for dry eyes and a majority of patients use over-the-counter artificial tear eye drops. The surface of eye is always covered with a thin layer of liquid known as the tear film which is essential for health of eye. - First of all, one needs to evaluate their current medications. Experts state that this could worsen the symptoms of dry eyes. - Avoid smoking, passive second-hand smoking as well. - Avoid low-humidity environments and air drafts. Install humidifiers at work and home. - Lower your computer screen to below eye level. Take regular breaks and increase the frequency of blinking. - Studies say dry eye symptoms can be improved with increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as omega-3 and omega-6. - For moderate to severe dry eye, punctal plugs can be used to slow tear drainage via the punctal orifice. By slowing tear drainage, these semi-permanent, non-absorbable plugs increase the volume of tears on the surface of the eye and lower the osmolarity of the tears. 33% - Percentage of pe Continue reading >>

Eyedrops For Diabetic Retinopathy Possible In The Future?

Eyedrops For Diabetic Retinopathy Possible In The Future?

Eyedrops for Diabetic Retinopathy Possible in the Future? LISBON, PORTUGAL Early topical treatment for diabetic retinopathy may be possible in the future, at least for a subset of diabetes patients, new trial results suggest. Findings from the European Consortium for the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy (EUROCONDOR) were presented September 13 at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2017 Annual Meeting by Rafael Sim, MD, head of diabetes and metabolism at Vall d'Hebron Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain. The 2-year randomized trial compared the effects of twice-daily eyedrops containing the neuroprotective agents somatostatin or brimonidine against placebo drops for arresting neurodegeneration and for effects on a variety of retinal and visual outcomes. Eyedrops were chosen as a way to target early stages of diabetic eye disease noninvasively and without systemic side effects. Neuroprotective agents were studied because prior preclinical and clinical evidence has suggested that neurodegeneration precedes microvascular impairment in diabetic retinopathy, Dr Sim explained. However, in an unexpected finding, assessment with multifocal electroretinography (mfERG) showed that two-thirds of the 449 patients with type 2 diabetes for at least 5 years actually did not have signs of neurodysfunction at baseline and in them the drugs had no effect at 2 years. But among the smaller proportion who did, both drugs appeared to significantly slow the progression of the neurodegeneration. "We have seen two types of patients. In one, neurodegeneration appears at the beginning and perhaps is important in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy.But in some patients, we just found microangiopathy without neural dysfunction. This was a surprise.We have to unde Continue reading >>

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye problems and diabetes introduction If you have diabetes, regular visits to your ophthalmologist for eye exams are important to avoid eye problems. High blood sugar (glucose) increases the risk of diabetes eye problems. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults age 20 to 74. If you have eye problems and diabetes, don't buy a new pair of glasses as soon as you notice you have blurred vision. It could just be a temporary eye problem that develops rapidly with diabetes and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar in diabetes causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. To correct this kind of eye problem, you need to get your blood sugar back into the target range (90-130 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL before meals, and less than 180 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal). It may take as long as three months after your blood sugar is well controlled for your vision to fully get back to normal. Blurred vision can also be a symptom of more serious eye problem with diabetes. The three major eye problems that people with diabetes may develop and should be aware of are cataracts, glaucoma, and retinopathy. A cataract is a clouding or fogging of the normally clear lens of the eye. The lens is what allows us to see and focus on an image just like a camera. Although anyone can get cataracts, people with diabetes get these eye problems at an earlier age than most and the condition progresses more rapidly than in people without diabetes. If you have a cataract, there is a cloudy area in the lens of your eye that results in the inability to focus light, and your vision is impaired. Symptoms of this eye problem in diabetes include blurred or glared vision. During cataract surgery, the cloudy lens is removed or cleaned ou Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease comprises a group of eye conditions that affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema (DME), cataract, and glaucoma. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness. Diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed or leak fluid, distorting vision. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. DME is a consequence of diabetic retinopathy that causes swelling in the area of the retina called the macula. Controlling diabetes—by taking medications as prescribed, staying physically active, and maintaining a healthy diet—can prevent or delay vision loss. Because diabetic retinopathy often goes unnoticed until vision loss occurs, people with diabetes should get a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year. Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic eye disease can protect against vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with several therapies, used alone or in combination. NEI supports research to develop new therapies for diabetic retinopathy, and to compare the effectiveness of existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula, lens and the optic nerve. Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye conditions that can affect people with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue called the retina that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Sore Dry Eyes In Diabetes

Sore Dry Eyes In Diabetes

Introduction Sore eyes are particularly common in diabetes for various reasons. minor irritation is probably a side effect of all the medications, such as the blood pressure medication. This is common and not serious. part of the reason for this is that people may develop blepharitis, which is inflammation/infection of the eyelids you may have 'dry eyes'. Dry eyes is explained here in detail. if you have had diabetes a long time, and have diabetic neuropathy, this can lead to very serious problems Your eyes may feel tired, scratchy or gritty, as though there is something in them. They also be a little itchy, and they may be red. See animation. They may feel more sore in the wind, or any dry hot atmosphere. Contact lenses, or any thing that reduces blinking may make 'dry eyes' more uncomfortable, such as watching TV or a computer screen, or sewing. Stopping the blood pressure medication can lead to major problems, and it is much safer to put up with and treat the sore eyes than stop the medication. Sore and perhaps slightly dry eyes..treatment There are two parts to the treatment. the lubricants are discussed here. treat the blepharitis, described here. This is mainly eyelid cleaning. Moderately dry eyes..treatment Again, there are two parts to the treatment. the lubricants ... gels are best. treat the blepharitis, described here. This is mainly mainly eyelid cleaning. more severely dry eyes are best treated with preservative free eye drops Severely dry eyes/diabetic corneal neuropathy There are several parts to the treatment. the lubricants are discussed here. treat the blepharitis, described here plugs may be needed Very dry eyes are discussed here. diabetic corneal neuropathy is discussed here. Treatment for the severest cases includes eyelid closure to allow the corn Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Blurry Vision: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Blurry Vision: What You Need To Know

Diabetes and blurry vision Diabetes refers to a complex metabolic disease in which your body either can’t produce insulin, doesn’t produce enough insulin, or simply can’t use it efficiently. All your body’s cells need sugar (glucose) for energy. Insulin helps to break down and deliver sugar to cells throughout your body. Sugar levels build up in your blood if you don’t have enough insulin to break it down. This is known as hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia can negatively affect every part of your body, including your eyes. Blurry vision is often one of the first warning signs of diabetes. Your vision may be blurry because fluid is leaking into the lens of your eye. This makes the lens swell and change shape. Those changes make it hard for your eyes to focus, so things start to look fuzzy. You may also get blurred vision when you start insulin treatment. This is due to shifting fluids, but it generally resolves after a few weeks. For many people, as blood sugar levels stabilize, so does their vision. How can diabetes cause blurry vision? Diabetic retinopathy is a term that describes retinal disorders caused by diabetes. Some of these disorders include macular edema and proliferative retinopathy. Macular edema is when the macula swells due to leaking fluid. The macula is the part of the retina that gives you sharp central vision. Other symptoms of macular edema include wavy vision and color changes. Proliferative retinopathy is when blood vessels leak into the center of your eye. Blurry vision is one of the signs that this is happening. You may also experience spots or floaters, or have trouble with night vision. Blurry vision can also be a symptom of glaucoma, a disease in which pressure in your eye damages the optic nerve. According to the National Eye Institute, i Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dry Eye: The Forgotten Connection

Diabetes And Dry Eye: The Forgotten Connection

12th Annual Diabetes Report At least half of patients with diabetes also exhibit dry eye symptoms. Assess these patients from the start. Goal Statement: Diabetes is often associated with several significant ocular conditions, such as retinopathy, refractive changes, cataracts, nerve palsies, glaucoma and macular edema. However, one of the most common ocular complications associated with diabetes is dry eye. This article traces the complex relationship between diabetes and dry eye, and explores several potential management strategies for controlling both conditions. Faculty/Editorial Board: Milton M. Hom, O.D. Credit Statement: This course is COPE approved for 2 hours of CE credit. COPE ID is 28593-GL. Check with your local state licensing board to see if this counts toward your CE requirement for relicensure. Joint-Sponsorship Statement: This continuing education course is joint-sponsored by the Pennsylvania College of Optometry. Disclosure Statement: Dr. Hom is a consultant to Abbott Medical Optics, Allergan, CIBA Vision, CooperVision, Baush + Lomb, Inspire Pharmaceuticals and Essilor. Are we seeing more patients with diabetes today than two decades ago? Yes–– without question. Diabetes used to be just another condition. Now, it is an epidemic. In fact, diabetes is quickly emerging as one of the biggest health-related catastrophes the world has ever witnessed.1 And, the problem is not exclusive to the United States. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there will be 370 million people with diabe tes on the planet by 2030, which is nearly twice the figure reported in 2000.2 In the United States alone, 11.3% of adults have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes.3 Furthermore, the treatment costs are overwhelming. Each year, $174 billion is spent on medication Continue reading >>

Eye Drops For Diabetic Retinopathy May Replace Painful Eye Injections

Eye Drops For Diabetic Retinopathy May Replace Painful Eye Injections

Eye Drops for Diabetic Retinopathy May Replace Painful Eye Injections Eye drops may soon be used to treat diabetic retinopathy and prevent blindness,replacing painful and costlyeye injections. Researchers from the University of Nottingham in the UK are looking into eye drops that can be used for patients with diabetic retinopathy and hope to offer these drops for clinical trial patients within the next three to five years. Diabetic retinopathy is a diabetes complication caused by elevated blood sugar levels over time which damage the small blood vessels in the eyes retina causing leaks and swelling. Over time this can lead to visual impairment and blindness. Eye DropsWould Save Money, Time and Increase Comfort This research was able to move forward thanks to a grant from Nottinghamshire Freemasons and the National Eye Research Centre. The studys lead author is Professor David Bates from the University of Nottingham School of Medicine said in a university press release ,We are extremely grateful for the grant we have received from the Freemasons and National Eye Research Centre. Without their support, this project would not have been possible and we would not be able to find out whether drugs that are already being developed for other eye diseases could be also be used in diabetic retinopathy. He added that, Diabetes is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in the working population in the UK. The impact of this research means that in the future diabetic patients could be offered a better, more effective way of preventing them from losing their sight. Diabetes is also the leading cause of blindness in the working population in the United States. Right now patients getting treatment for diabetic retinopathy have to undergo expensive and inconvenient trips to eye cl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Diabetic Retinopathy: Q&a

Diabetes And Diabetic Retinopathy: Q&a

Q&A Menu To find the Q&As most helpful to you, please click on one of these subjects: How Does Diabetes Affect Eyes? Q: How does diabetes affect your eyes? — L.L., Connecticut A: Diabetes causes problems in the retina with what are collectively called microvascular abnormalities. The small blood vessels develop microaneurysms and leak blood. New blood vessel growth (neovascularization) occurs. Unfortunately, these blood vessels are weak and also leak. These leaks (hemorrhages) can cause irreversible damage to the retina and permanent vision loss. Patients with controlled diabetes do better than those with uncontrolled diabetes. However, even a person whose diabetes is under perfect control can still develop diabetic retinopathy — hence, the need for yearly retinal exams. — Dr. Slonim Q: Does diabetic retinopathy get progressively worse? — F.R. A: Yes. When left unrecognized and untreated, diabetic retinopathy can get worse and eventually lead to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can even get worse despite use of the best treatments that currently exist for it. — Dr. Slonim Q: My father has type 2 diabetes and he is seeing double. We went to the hospital about a week ago and they said the diabetes had affected a nerve on the right eye. Can medicine get his sight back to normal? — W.C. A: Diabetes can affect any one of the three cranial nerves that are responsible for movement of the eyes. Diabetes is one of the more common conditions associated with sixth nerve (Abducens nerve) palsies. Paralysis of this nerve affects the lateral rectus muscle that allows the eye to look outward. There is no specific medicine for this. The paralysis can be temporary and last a few months or it can be permanent. — Dr. Slonim Q: Can diabetes cause you to have eye infections suc Continue reading >>

Treating Dry Eye In People With Diabetes

Treating Dry Eye In People With Diabetes

What is dry eye syndrome? Dry eye syndrome is a common problem and is one of the most frequent reasons given for seeking eye care. Patients will complain of eye irritation, fatigue, dryness and visual problems such as blurriness. The causes of dry eye are many but the end result is a disturbance of the tear film due to either decreased tear production or excessive evaporation of tears.(1) Symptoms of Dry Eye Discomfort Dryness Burning Stinging Grittiness Foreign Body Sensation Eye fatigue Vision disturbance (i.e., blurriness) These symptoms are not trivial and dry eye has a significant impact on quality of life. A recent study of over 500 people found that even after controlling for factors such as age, hypertension and diabetes, people with dry eye had significantly more problems with reading, using a computer, watching television and driving both during the day and at night.(2) The blurriness experienced by people with dry eye when doing activities such as watching television, reading or driving is thought to be due in part to problems with the tear film between blinks. Specifically, the tear film breaks up much faster between blinks in people with dry eye compared to those without dry eye. When the tear film breaks up between blinks, the surface of the eye is exposed and dry areas can occur and lead to dry eye symptoms. In tests that measure the visual acuity between blinks, people with dry eye had a 50% reduction in the rate of visual acuity decay compared to people without dry eye indicating that visual acuity deteriorates faster in dry eye patients.(3) When the impact on patient’s quality of life and visual acuity is taken as a whole, it is apparent why dry eye syndrome is considered a public health problem that requires effective treatment. Dry eye in people wi Continue reading >>

5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes & Vision

5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes & Vision

Treatment can include medicine and special eye drops. Surgery and laser treatments can help with drainage. If you have diabetes, youre also more likely to get a rare condition called neovascular glaucoma. This makes new blood vessels grow on the iris, the colored part of your eye. They block the normal flow of fluid and raise eye pressure. It's difficult to treat. Your doctor might try laser surgery to cut back on the vessels. Or he could use implants to help drain the fluid. The retina is a group of cells on the back of your eye that take in light. They turn it into images that the optic nerve sends to your brain . Damage to small blood vessels in your retina causes diabetic retinopathy . It's related to high blood sugar levels . If you dont find and treat it early, you could go blind. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to get it. If you keep your blood sugar under control, you lower your chances. People with type 1 diabetes rarely develop the condition before puberty . In adults, it's rare to see unless you've had type 1 diabetes for at least 5 years. If you keep tight control of your blood sugar with either an insulin pump or multiple daily insulin injections, youre far less likely to get this condition. If you have type 2 diabetes, you may have signs of eye problems when youre diagnosed. Control your blood sugar, blood pressure , and cholesterol to slow or prevent the disease. If you smoke, try to quit. Itll improve your eyes and your overall health. Background retinopathy. Your blood vessels are damaged, but you can still see OK. It can get worse if you don't manage your diabetes well. Maculopathy. This is damage to the macula, a critical area of your retina. It can greatly affect your vision. Proliferative retinopathy. It happens when cells at Continue reading >>

Eye Drops Could Help Treat Diabetic Retinopathy

Eye Drops Could Help Treat Diabetic Retinopathy

Eye drops could help treat diabetic retinopathy Eye drops could help treat diabetic retinopathy Gene link discovered between type 2 diabetes and heart disease 05 September 2017 Twice-daily eye drops containing neuroprotective agents could be used successfully to treat diabetic retinopathy, research suggests. In a two-year trial the specialist drops were compared to placebo drops and shown to significantly slow the progression of neurodegeneration (decrease in nerve function) of the retina. The two drugs tested by the study were brimonidine and somatostatin. Rafael Simo, MD, head of diabetes and metabolism at Vall d'Hebron Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues explored the effects of eye drops on patients to see if they could prevent or arrest neurodegeneration, which results in the progressive loss of structure of the retina. The eye drops contained one of two neuroprotective agents: somatostatin or brimonidine. A total of 449 patients with type 2 diabetes , half of whom had at least one microaneurysm (very small bleeding) in one eye, were randomised to twice-daily drops of brimonidine, somatostatin or placebo for 24 months. The results showed that overall, the drugs did not show a difference compared with placebo in preventing neurodegeneration. However, the researchers noted that this may be down to the fact that almost two-thirds of the group did not have significant signs of nerve damage in the retina prior to the study. When the researchers reviewed the 35 per cent of participants that did have marked signs of nerve damage at the start of the study, the drugs helped to halt the progression of neurodegeneration whereas the placebo drops could not. This indicates that the both of the drugs were effective in slowing down or halting the progression of n Continue reading >>

Say Goodbye To Dry Eye

Say Goodbye To Dry Eye

Eye problems, such as diabetic retinopathy and macular edema, are well-known complications of diabetes. Fortunately, these conditions can be treated and even prevented if caught early (which is why getting an annual dilated eye exam is so important for people who have diabetes). What is dry eye? Another eye problem that’s more common in people who have diabetes is dry eye. According to the National Eye Institute, dry eye is a condition in which the eye does not produce tears properly. It can also involve tears not having the right consistency or evaporating too quickly. Tears are necessary to help maintain moisture on the surface of the eye and for clear vision. In many cases the surface of the eye becomes inflamed; if not treated, pain, ulcers, scars, and possibly loss of some vision can occur. Between 10% and 30% of the population suffer from dry eye. One study showed that people who have diabetes have a 50% chance of getting dry eye. What causes dry eye? There are a lot of causes of dry eye, including: Age: The older we get, the drier the eyes can get. Most people over the age of 65 have some degree of dry eye. Gender: Women are more likely to have dry eye than men, thanks to hormonal changes. Medications: Blood pressure medications, birth control pills, antihistamines, decongestants, and antidepressants can reduce tear production. Medical conditions: Having diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and thyroid problems, along with certain eye problems, raise the risk of dry eye. Research shows that dry eye in people with diabetes is typically linked with a type of neuropathy called autonomic neuropathy; this neuropathy can affect the nerves that control tear production. Environment: Dry, windy, or smoky climates increase dry eye risk. Staring at a computer screen all Continue reading >>

More in diabetes