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Best Electrolyte Drink For Diabetics

Ors Day: Can Diabetics Have Oral Rehydration Solution?

Ors Day: Can Diabetics Have Oral Rehydration Solution?

July 29 is celebrated as ORS Day to focus attention on the importance of oral rehydration solution (ORS), a live-saver for infants and young children in a developing country like ours. Diarrhoea and vomiting can cause the depletion of water and salts in the human body, which can be fatal. That’s why ORS or electrolyte powder is given to prevent this loss due to dehydration. The latest formula or ORS released by the WHO is a combination of a sodium chloride or salt, potassium chloride, trisodium citrate and anhydrous glucose which simulates water and electrolyte absorption in the gut. Dehydration and diabetes Although it was introduced to combat infant mortality due to diarrhoea, ORS is also administered to adults who lose fluids as a result of illness or excessive sweating. Among the diabetics, dehydration is a serious issue. Insulin production in diabetics is less, which makes it difficult for the body to remove carbohydrates from the body. This causes the body to increase urine production to flush out the carbs, causing dehydration. Drinking a lot of water could fix the issue, but that wouldn’t do on its own. The body also has to be replenished with the essential electrolytes which are flushed away. (Read: How to prevent dehydration) Since the large part of the ORS solution is glucose, some diabetic patients express concern over drinking it, lest it spikes up their sugar level. So, to put an end to this riddle, researchers from International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh conducted a study to ascertain whether it is safe for diabetic patients to have the ORS solution, in case they suffer from dehydration. (Read: Tips to maintain acid-alkali balance for diabetics) What the study says The researchers themselves were sure, even before they conduct Continue reading >>

Dehydration And Diabetes

Dehydration And Diabetes

Tweet People with diabetes have an increased risk of dehydration as high blood glucose levels lead to decreased hydration in the body. Diabetes insipidus, a form of diabetes that is not linked with high blood sugar levels, also carries a higher risk of dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration The symptoms of dehydration include: Thirst Headache Dry mouth and dry eyes Dizziness Tiredness Dark yellow coloured urine Symptoms of severe dehydration Low blood pressure Sunken eyes A weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat Feeling confused Lethargy Causes and contributory factors of dehydration The following factors can contribute to dehydration. Having more of these factors present at one time can raise the risk of dehydration: Dehydration and blood glucose levels If our blood glucose levels are higher than they should be for prolonged periods of time, our kidneys will attempt to remove some of the excess glucose from the blood and excrete this as urine. Whilst the kidneys filter the blood in this way, water will also be removed from the blood and will need replenishing. This is why we tend to have increased thirst when our blood glucose levels run too high. If we drink water, we can help to rehydrate the blood. The other method the body uses is to draw on other available sources of water from within the body, such as saliva, tears and taking stored water from cells of the body. This is why we may experience a dry mouth and dry eyes when our blood glucose levels are high. If we do not have access to drink water, the body will find it difficult to pass glucose out of the blood via urine and can result in further dehydration as the body seeks to find water from our body's cells. Treating dehydration Dehydration can be treated by taking on board fluids. Water is ideal because it has no add Continue reading >>

Best Electrolyte Drinks For Diabetes

Best Electrolyte Drinks For Diabetes

If you have diabetes and you are looking to stay hydrated with an electrolyte drink, you know it can be difficult to find one that isn’t too high in sugar and carbohydrates. If you have started an exercise regime, it can also be challenging to keep your blood sugar from getting too low. Exercise removes glucose from the blood without using insulin, and is crucial in getting diabetes under control, but it is a delicate balance for your blood sugar being too high when you are inactive, and too low when you are active. It is important that the electrolyte drink matches your activity level, and you are not drinking an electrolyte drink with 25 carbohydrates while you are sitting inside, or one with zero carbohydrates while you are combining Zumba, Jazzercize and CrossFit. In regards to these parameters, perhaps you were advised to choose an electrolyte drink that uses artificial sweeteners. While writing The New Menu for Diabetes, I did some research on artificial sweeteners and was shocked that these were recommended for diabetics. The studies clearly showed that these in fact should be avoided, and I wanted to go more in depth in this article regarding why you should avoid Splenda and Acesulfame K. Why You Should Avoid the Following Electrolyte Drinks The following is based on my research and opinion. 1. Powerade Zero After doing some research, I noticed that Powerade Zero was the drink of choice for many diabetics due to it having zero calories. What’s in Powerade Zero? UK Label: Water, citric acid, mineral salts (sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride, potassium phosphate), natural berry flavouring with other natural flavourings, acidity regulator (E332), sweeteners (sucralose, acesulfame K), colour (E133). US Label: Water, Citric Acid, Natural Flavor Continue reading >>

Sports Drinks And Diabetes

Sports Drinks And Diabetes

People with diabetes recognize the importance of including exercise in their daily routines and staying hydrated during workouts. Lately it seems everyone is sipping on sports drinks while they exercise. Discover more about which sports drinks to choose when you have diabetes. Dehydration can cause high blood sugar, high blood pressure and other health issues for people with diabetes. It is essential to stay well hydrated before, during and after exercise. Sports drinks are made to prevent dehydration, boost performance and optimize recovery. Each drink contains different ingredients based on its purpose. The sports drink you sip should be in accordance with your dietary and fitness goals. Sport drinks made primarily for rehydration usually contain carbohydrates and electrolytes such as potassium and sodium. As a result, carbohydrate and rapid fluid absorption is faster. This can make them more effective than water by itself. Sports drinks typically have a high glycemic index. People with diabetes should check the carbohydrate and calorie content to adjust their nutrition and insulin intake as necessary. Most people with diabetes do not need the extra sugar or electrolytes in their drinks unless they are true fitness fanatics. Consult with your doctor if you have questions about adjusting your insulin and diet when exercising and sipping sports drinks or if you need them at all. People with type 2 diabetes should be cautious about consuming high calorie sports drinks. The various sports drink people at the gym are sipping might not be the best choice for people with diabetes. The average sports drink contains 120 calories, much like a regular can of soda. Glucerna shakes can be used in place of a sports drink made specifically for people with diabetes. Read the labels o Continue reading >>

Of Healthy Waters And Hydrators

Of Healthy Waters And Hydrators

The hottest months of the year are here, and finding some thirst-quenching drink options can be tough for those of us who need to count carbs and respect the blood sugar effect of anything we swallow. Seriously, I just went through this in Indy when dealing with a string of days above 90 degrees and needing to make sure I had enough hydration options while doing some work outdoors. One gets tired of plain water, and diet soda is not so thirst-quenching in extreme heat. So we're always on the lookout for true "D-friendly" drinks, that won't impact our blood sugars but also aren't filled loads of artificial chemicals and sweeteners that are suspected of negative effects. So what's refreshing and good for us at the same time, we ask? Fortunately, we have some new options in the Diabetes Community! Amy swears by the new Sparkling ICE drink, appearing in supermarkets around the country. It's carbonated flavored water with zero carbohydrates and zero calories -- and comes in intense but very pleasant fruit flavors. We plan a review of that one soon. Meanwhile, a new sports drink that's captured my attention recently is called Nutri-Twist Wow Water. Created by Michigan startup Twisted Concepts about two years ago, it was the original brainchild of the Andoni family in the suburbs of Detroit, dealing with a type 1 diagnosis in their young son. They were frustrated with the diabetes drink options, so they invented their own, establishing a Michigan-based business that's expanding throughout the Midwest. We think their story fits right in to our Small But Mighty series! Wow Water first caught my eye in Spring 2012, while visiting a JDRF conference in the Metro Detroit area when I met the man behind the drink, Peter Andoni. He's actually known to most folks locally as the man behi Continue reading >>

Natural Electrolyte Drink Recipe (with Flavor Options)

Natural Electrolyte Drink Recipe (with Flavor Options)

Drinking enough pure clean water is one of the most important things we can do for overall health. In most cases, water alone is wonderful. For times of exercise and exertion where sweat causes mineral loss, a homemade natural electrolyte drink recipe can also be helpful. Here’s why: Plain water doesn’t contain high levels of electrolytes. The body loses a lot of minerals during exercise. It can be helpful to add electrolytes and minerals to help rehydration after times of high-intensity exercise or lots of sweating. This doesn’t mean we should all be drinking electrolyte drinks on the regular, but they are helpful at times … Like this one: My Cautionary Tale … This post could also be titled “how to avoid a big hospital charge for IV fluids while on vacation.” Hopefully you can learn from my mistake on this one. Here’s what happened: My husband and I finally got away for a long overdue 10-year anniversary trip (it was a long time after our actual anniversary … because babies). His version of “relaxing” is doing all the activities, so we were snorkeling, sailing, and had plans to scuba dive. Normally, if we’re going to be out in the sun doing strenuous activities, I make this recipe and have it with me. On this trip, since the kids weren’t with us, I’d foolishly forgotten some of the ingredients and figured I’d just make sure to drink enough water. That was working fine until one night (after a long day of snorkeling), I had wine with dinner and probably not enough water. The next morning, we didn’t have any non-tap water in the room so I grabbed a coffee instead and figured I’d get some water when we got to the beach. Cue Heat Exhaustion The beach was busy so it took them a couple of hours to bring out water. At that point, I noticed I Continue reading >>

How To Make A Drink With Electrolytes Without Sugar

How To Make A Drink With Electrolytes Without Sugar

Electrolyte replacement is essential during periods of excessive sweating to avoid a serious and potentially life-threatening condition called hyponatremia. This condition occurs when too much sodium is lost in the fluids around your cells, causing water to rush into your cells, which leaves them swelling with excess water. Your body becomes overwhelmed, particularly your brain, resulting symptoms such as disorientation, fatigue, confusion, hallucinations and coma. Rehydrate and re-establish your electrolyte balance without the sugar and additives of commercial preparations, by making your own electrolyte replacement beverage. Video of the Day Add sea salt, lemon juice and water to a shaker container. Shake thoroughly. Sweeten to taste with refined stevia extract. Stevia is a sugar substitute with 0 calories; it is sweeter than sugar. Drink small amounts at a time, re-shaking frequently to ensure the sea salt does not settle. Using during or immediately after exercise to replenish fluids and electrolytes. 1 quart water 1/2 tbsp. sea salt 2 lemons, freshly squeezed Shaker container Refined stevia extract Do not attempt to treat serious dehydration on your own. If you are showing symptoms of hyponatremia, such as disorientation, fatigue and hallucinations, or suspect moderate to severe dehydration, go to your nearest emergency room. Continue reading >>

Are Sports Drinks Safe For Diabetics?

Are Sports Drinks Safe For Diabetics?

While it is important to prevent dehydration and replace electrolytes that you might lose through excessive sweating, you must also consider the amount of carbohydrates and calories that you are consuming throughout the day. Below is information on some common sports drinks. You can see the difference in the amount of carbohydrates and calories. Gatorade: 50 calories, 14 carbohydrates (grams) Mountain Dew Sport: 95 calories, 24 carbohydrates (grams) All Sport: 70 calories, 19 carbohydrates (grams) Rehydrate: 40 calories, 10 carbohydrates (grams) Performance: 100 calories, 25 carbohydrates (grams) So for example, if you consume four 8-oz bottles of Gatorade, you have taken in 200 calories and 56 grams of carbohydrates — and those values double if you are drinking 16-oz bottles. The calories and carbohydrates can add up quickly, causing high sugar levels. The best practice is to look at each brand’s calorie and carbohydrate counts and the number of drinks that you are consuming a day to determine if it is within your daily caloric and carbohydrate requirements. It's also a good idea to supplement sports beverages with plain water. Learn more in the Everyday Health Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

Make Your Own Sugar-free Electrolyte Drink

Make Your Own Sugar-free Electrolyte Drink

Make Your Own Sugar-Free Electrolyte Drink 2019 About, Inc. (Dotdash) All rights reserved Make Your Own Sugar-Free Electrolyte Drink Laura Dolson is a health and food writer who develops low-carb and gluten-free recipes for home cooks. It's easy to succumb to the marketing behind sports drinks that if we exercise, we need sports drinks to replenish ourselves. It makes you wonder how athletes and exercisers got through a workout without them 20 or 30 years ago. However, there is a lot of evidence that electrolytes are indeed very effective in regulating your body's fluid balance, especially during and after exercise, illness, and if you're a strict low-carb dieter. If you're a low-carb dieter who exercises, or if you're on a low-carb diet and get sick, you doubly need these added electrolytes. Why a Low-Carb Diet Increases Your Need for Electrolytes On a low-carb diet , your body begins to use fat rather than glucose for fuel, and in doing so, it retains less water. As you excrete more water, important mineralsthe electrolytes as calcium, sodium, magnesium, chloride, and potassium, specificallyare also excreted from your system. So it's key to replenish them in order to avoid negative symptoms such as lightheadedness and dehydrationespecially if you're also exercising or ill. It turns out that 2 tablespoons of lemon juice contain almost exactly the amount of potassium in 8 ounces of a typical sports drink. A pinch of salt supplies 110 milligrams of sodium, the same amount in 8 ounces of a sports drink. So, if you want to make your own low-carb sports drink, it's quite easy. However, if you've ever walked down the sports drinks aisle at the drugstore, you know there's a lot of sugar and other junk added to these items. There is a scientific reason behind why many of thes Continue reading >>

The Best Liquids To Drink If You Are Diabetic

The Best Liquids To Drink If You Are Diabetic

When you're diabetic, you need to be careful about not only the foods you consume but also about what you drink. A wide range of beverages are safe for diabetics, but many others are not. Pick the wrong type of drink, and you're apt to experience complications as a result of your elevated blood glucose. To stay healthy, keep a list of the best liquids to drink when you're at home, at work and even while traveling. Video of the Day Quench Your Thirst The American Diabetes Association suggests that diabetics commit to consuming drinks that have either no calories or that have a very low number of calories per serving. The healthiest choice is water, which does not have any calories and is also an ideal source of hydration. Other healthy drinks to consider adding to your meal plan include unsweetened tea, unsweetened coffee, diet soft drinks and low-calorie beverages such as club soda and vegetable juice. Low-fat milk and 100 percent fruit juice are also safe, but note each beverage's calories and carbs, and track this information in your meal plan. Spice Up Your Water If you primarily drink water but seek variety, make a subtle change to your choice of beverage. Instead of plain water, add a few squirts of fresh lemon or lime. This changes the flavor without significantly boosting the drink's caloric value. Consider other alternatives such as a few pieces of peeled, fresh ginger, a slice of cucumber or even a few, diced mint leaves. If you have an intense craving for a sweet, flavorful drink, don't give in to your urge to consume a soft drink. Instead, opt for a diet version that's sweetened with an artificial sweetener such as acesulfame potassium, aspartame or sucralose. A long list of sodas and fruit juices contain this type of sweetener and, as a result, have either n Continue reading >>

Homemade Electrolyte Sports Drink {honey & Stevia-sweetened}

Homemade Electrolyte Sports Drink {honey & Stevia-sweetened}

When athletes are working out, they’re losing sweat and expending energy, and the purpose of a “sports drink” is to replace that liquid as well as other necessary electrolytes and carbs to keep the athlete’s energy up as they continue to exert themselves (or recover). To develop a recipe for a natural electrolyte sports drink, I did my best to achieve the proper proportions of all those things as well as mimic the fun taste of Gatorade that my husband enjoys. It irks me when he (a) spends $1+ a bottle on junk and (b) drinks the junk. I try to jump in when I know he’s going somewhere that he’ll want Gatorade and hand him our homemade sports drink instead. We’re going to do a lot of Math today, so put your thinking caps on and I’ll grab my chalk. (I know, that dates me. I actually had a white board when I taught but still think of chalkboards as the standard.) What’s in Gatorade? Gatorade drinks (and any other electrolyte-replacing sports drink, as well as drinks designed to rehydrate and heal during a bout of diarrhea or childhood illnesses) contain five major components: water (for hydration, obviously) sugars (for energy/carbs) citric acid and sodium citrate (both preservatives, also sodium citrate in some forms has been show to increase running performance – but it also chelates calcium, a necessary electrolyte that needs to be replaced!) salt (to replace the electrolyte sodium) monopotassium phosphate (chosen form of potassium, another essential electrolyte) Besides the questionable “natural and artificial flavors” and the artificial food dyes, that’s all that’s needed to be “Gatorade.” We can do that. Real Food is Even Better In fact, we can do one better with real food. We first look at the World Health Organization’s recipe for a Continue reading >>

Electrolytes And How They Help With High Blood Sugars

Electrolytes And How They Help With High Blood Sugars

Ever wonder why when we are severely dehydrated as diabetics or when we are dealing with an extreme high blood sugar our medical team tells us to make sure we replenish our electrolytes? I mean, what is an electrolyte anyway, what are the symptoms of low electrolytes and how can they help us as diabetics or if you’re just out mowing the lawn? Diabetic or not, they are extremely important when it comes to our overall health so let’s take a closer look! When dissolved in fluid, salts tend to break apart into their component ions, creating an electrically-conductive solution. For example, table salt (NaCl) dissolved in water dissociates into its component positive ion of sodium (Na+) and negative ion of chloride (Cl-). Any fluid that conducts electricity, such as this new saltwater solution, is known as an electrolyte solution: the salt ions of which it’s composed are then commonly referred to as electrolytes. So that leads us to the next question… What Are Electrolytes? There are several common electrolytes found in the body, each serving a specific and important role, but most are in some part responsible for maintaining the balance of fluids between the intracellular (inside the cell) and extracellular (outside the cell) environments. This balance is critically important for things like hydration, nerve impulses, muscle function, and pH levels. With the correct body water balance, the electrolytes separate into positive and negative ions. When the body loses water or becomes dehydrated an electrolyte imbalance starts to occur. During heavy exercise, sodium and potassium electrolytes in particular are lost through sweating. To ensure constant electrolyte concentrations in the body, fluids must be regularly consumed. To avoid an electrolyte imbalance which can cau Continue reading >>

Best Beverages For Staying Hydrated

Best Beverages For Staying Hydrated

Summer is quickly moving along, and soon the leaves will be turning. Hopefully you’ve been able to get out and enjoy the fine weather, and maybe take advantage of the longer days to walk, swim, golf, or play tennis. All great ways to be outside and do your body some good at the same time. Physical activity, whether it’s indoors or outdoors, can often leave you sweaty and parched. So what should you drink, and when? Do you really need those fancy sports drinks? Or is plain old water just as good? Read on to find out how to stay hydrated before, during, and after being physically active. Why rehydrate? The answer is pretty obvious: to avoid becoming dehydrated. When you’re dehydrated, your body doesn’t have enough water to function properly. You lose water through sweating, breathing, crying, salivating, urinating, and having bowel movements. When you’re exercising, water is primarily lost through sweating and heavy breathing. If you’re an athlete or playing a sport, for example, being dehydrated can impair your performance. More importantly, dehydration can cause a number of symptoms, and some of them are potentially dangerous. Symptoms of mild dehydration include: • Dry mouth • Being thirsty • Headache • Muscle cramps • Dark urine Symptoms of severe dehydration include: • Dizziness • Rapid heartbeat • Rapid breathing • Feeling confused • Feeling very sleepy • Heat stroke Severe dehydration is a medical emergency, and needs to be treated promptly. Also, keep in mind that high blood sugar levels can increase the likelihood of becoming dehydrated: When blood sugars are high, you’ll end up urinating more often. How to rehydrate Your body can lose more than a quart of water in one hour of exercise, depending on the intensity of your exerci Continue reading >>

Summer Precautions For Diabetics

Summer Precautions For Diabetics

Summertime brings the heat, and along with it comes increased cases of dehydration. Diabetics have a more serious risk for dehydration and should take extra precautions, according to an expert at Baylor College of Medicine. “Everyone needs to stay hydrated during these hot summer months, but diabetics are at a higher risk and could face additional challenges because of blood sugar levels,” said Dr. Alan Garber, professor of medicine-endocrinology at Baylor. “Uncontrolled blood sugar levels are an independent cause of dehydration in diabetics.” As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys’ capability to absorb the sugar decreases. When this happens, individuals may pass more urine than usual, resulting in a quicker loss of fluids. “Dehydration is more dangerous in diabetics than non-diabetics because it can lead to ketoacidosis,” Garber said. “Ketoacidosis is the buildup of acid in the blood and can be potentially life-threatening.” Rehydration with fluids that contain electrolytes is crucial during these hot months. Garber recommends rehydrating with sugar-free sports drinks or Pedialyte and not drinking alcohol or caffeinated drinks. Alcohol and caffeine act as diuretics, which increase water loss from the body. People should drink 1,500 to 2,000 milliliters more than their insensible loss (water loss due to perspiration and urination) to keep the kidneys functioning well, he said. Besides staying hydrated, proper foot care is essential for diabetics. During the summer, it’s important to keep feet clean and dry because sweaty socks can cause ulcers to develop on the feet. “It’s important to check for sores daily because these sores can lead to a major source of infection,” Garber said. “Infection is the leading cause of diabetic amputation.” Ex Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

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