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How To Beat Diabetes: Simple Test To Show If You Need Treatment

How To Beat Diabetes: Simple Test To Show If You Need Treatment

If you're in an at-risk group, you can get a free annual blood-glucose test The earlier diabetes is picked up, the better the prognosis, expert says One in three of us has raised blood-sugar levels, research suggests Some experts call these levels 'stage one diabetes' or 'pre-diabetes' So you think you might be at risk of type 2 diabetes — what next? If you are in one of the at-risk groups (over 25 and from a South Asian or Afro-Caribbean background, or Caucasian and over 40, particularly if you are overweight, obese or have a family history of diabetes) you can ask your GP for a free annual blood-glucose test. 'All the evidence shows that the earlier diabetes is picked up the better the prognosis, as it allows for better blood glucose control,' says Professor Anthony Barnett, a leading diabetes researcher based at Birmingham's Heartlands Hospital. 'A GP screening is best in a high-risk individual because it is free and they can then offer immediate treatment.' If you don't qualify for this, some chemists, such as Lloydspharmacy, will do a risk assessment involving a questionnaire looking at such factors as weight, age, diet and family history. If this indicates you are at risk of diabetes, you will be given a simple finger-prick blood test which checks your levels of glucose and gives immediate results. If your levels are above normal, you will be asked to come back and do a second test after fasting overnight. There are home test kits, which will give you the same reading as a pharmacy test, but a pharmacist's interpretation will be more informed, says Professor Barnett. People with borderline readings may benefit from a discussion with their GP, he adds. To get the most accurate result from a home test kit, he suggests taking it at least 1-2 hours after a meal, or Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Understanding Gestational Diabetes: Glucose Monitoring

Fetal Monitoring, Gestational Diabetes, Integrative Medicine, Pregnancy and Birth, Weight Management What is self blood glucose monitoring? Once you are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes, you and your health care providers will want to know more about your day-to-day blood sugar levels. It is important to know how your exercise habits and eating patterns affect your blood sugars. Also, as your pregnancy progresses, the placenta will release more of the hormones that work against insulin. Testing your blood sugar level at important times during the day will help determine if proper diet and weight gain have kept blood sugar levels normal or if extra insulin is needed to help keep the fetus protected. Self blood glucose monitoring is done by using a special device to obtain a drop of your blood and test it for your blood sugar level. Your doctor or other health care provider will explain the procedure to you. Make sure that you are shown how to do the testing before attempting it on your own. Some items you may use to monitor your blood sugar levels are: Lancet–a disposable, sharp needle-like sticker for pricking the finger to obtain a drop of blood. Lancet device–a springloaded finger sticking device. Test strip–a chemically treated strip to which a drop of blood is applied. Color chart–a chart used to compare against the color on the test strip for blood sugar level. Glucose meter–a device which “reads” the test strip and gives you a digital number value. Your health care provider can advise you where to obtain the self-monitoring equipment in your area. You may want to inquire if any places rent or loan glucose meters, since it is likely you won't be needing it after your baby is born. How often and when should I test? You may need to test your blo Continue reading >>

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

Further proof the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been warming up to modern technology — it has just approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor that doesn’t require the user to prick themselves over and over for a blood sample. Today, the FDA cleared Abbot’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, a device that uses a small sensor wire inserted under the skin to determine glucose levels in adult diabetics. Another wand-like device is then waved over the sensor to measure and give a readout of those glucose levels. This is a milestone move for the FDA as diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States who currently have to test their blood sugar by pricking themselves several times throughout the day and every time they eat. However, the idea for a prickless blood sugar monitor isn’t new. Tech companies have increasingly shown an interest in the massive diabetics market over the past few years. Apple is rumored to be working on such a device and its CEO Tim Cook has even been spotted wearing a possible prototype that could connect to the Apple Watch. Other companies endeavor to build something similar, including Glucowise, which has a device still under development. However, it seems it’s not so easy to create a needleless blood sugar detector. Google tried to build a contact lens that could detect glucose but it seems the project has gone nowhere since drug company Novartis licensed the tech in 2014. Another FDA-approved device for glucose monitoring without the prick called the GlucoWatch was approved in the early 2000’s, but consumers found it cumbersome and it happened to cause a bad rash in some. But there’s new hope today that the Freestyle monitor has worked out all the kinks. The device is intended for those 18 a Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

U.S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn’t need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott’s new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. But most don’t do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. “We’re able to lower blood sugar safely” with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott’s device was approved for adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months. The company, based near Chicago, did not disclose the price of the reader or the sensors. Abbott’s system can’t be used with an insulin pump, a device worn a Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Hometesting Blood Glucose

Hometesting Blood Glucose

Many caregivers with diabetic pets test their pets' blood glucose at home using a glucometer. Home blood glucose monitoring is extremely beneficial for reasons of safety, better regulation and lower cost. Testing blood glucose in a cat or dog requires a bit of practice, but those who persevere master the skill eventually. The majority of feline caregivers on the Feline Diabetes Message Board (FDMB) home test. Monitoring your pet's blood glucose concentration at home has many benefits and is increasingly recommended by veterinarians, especially those who specialize in diabetes. Safety alone makes home blood glucose testing a worthwhile endeavor for pet owners. Just as with human diabetics, it is much safer to know an animal's current blood glucose level before injecting insulin; if the level is lower than usual, it may be appropriate to give a reduced dose in order to prevent a hypoglycemic crisis. Urine testing is not specific enough for this--either in blood glucose level or time period. This may be especially important for cats because of their potential for remission; pancreatic action may be sporadic as they are healing. Many people have reported on FDMB having discovered in a pre-shot test that the cat's blood glucose was already within the normal range and giving a dose of exogenous insulin might have caused hypoglycemia. Most of the veterinary sources advocating home testing (see list below) mention the greater accuracy of tests performed in the animal's home environment compared with a hospital setting. In the latter, particularly in cats, the blood glucose level is affected by stress hyperglycemia and in the case of curves where the animal is hospitalized for the day), inappetance. Another advantage is that the pet can be tested frequently, which is important i Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test Kits: 5 Leading Products On Market For Diabetics

Diabetes Test Kits: 5 Leading Products On Market For Diabetics

To effectively manage the symptoms and risks of diabetes, people with the disease have to test their blood glucose levels on a regular basis. In the past, glucose meters were big, bulky machines that took a long time to give a reading. In addition, the fluctuation of the readings made them unreliable. Thanks to current technology however, glucose level testing for diabetics has become much more efficient. Although reliability, accuracy, size, and expense are all factors to take into account when purchasing a test kit, the best kits are the ones that are so user-friendly that regular glucose testing is not a chore. An important resource is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which provides a list of recalls for all medical devices including diabetes test kits. Here are five test kits that are highly recommended for the management of diabetes: 1. One Touch Ultra Mini: This glucose monitor was rated as excellent overall by Men's Health. It scored 88/100 with consistency and accuracy being excellent, ease of use and features were rated "very good," and testers especially liked the compact size. Urgent: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here. 2. FreeStyle Lite Blood Glucose Monitoring System Diabetic Meter Kit: This kit has a consumer rating just under five stars. The monitor has a small, portable design, a backlight display, no coding, and requires only a small blood sample size of 0.3 microliter. In addition, test results are returned in approximately 5 seconds making this a quick meter. One consumer reviewer wrote, "My mother was recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. We were nervous about her daily testing, but this meter makes everything so easy we recommend this 100 percent." 3. True 2 Go Blood Glucose Meter with Twist and Test Process: With a high c Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter & Insurance Coverage

Blood Glucose Meter & Insurance Coverage

Different plans cover varying amounts of the meter/ strips; there are exceptions to the list below. Many plans cover strips through prescription plans so be sure to verify prescription plan coverage. Sometime it’s more cost effective through DME (durable medical equipment) so individual should check his/ her coverage. Also, some meter companies offer discount cards so it may be more cost effective to use the copay card instead of the recommendations below. Abbott/Freestyle is now available with automatic lower copays for all commercial plans at participating pharmacies (CVS, Rite Aid, Walmart, Walgreens, Giant, Costco, Wegman’s). Recommended meters by each company: Abbott - Freestyle Freedom, Freestyle Lite, Freestyle Insulinx, or Precision x-tra Accu-chek - Guide, Nano, Aviva or Compact Plus Bayer - Contour, Contour Next, Contour USB, or Breeze 2 One Touch - Verio, Ultra, Ultra 2, Ultra Smart, Ultra Mini Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Physical Limitations

Managing Diabetes With Physical Limitations

Do you have difficulty manipulating test strips or inserting them into your blood glucose meter? Can you no longer easily open medicine bottles? Do you sometimes struggle with tying your shoelaces? Many physical problems can interfere with your ability to manage your diabetes and take proper care of yourself more generally. Some of these problems, such as decreased feeling in your hands, may be a product of the diabetes itself, while other challenges such as tremors or poor joint mobility may be unrelated to your diabetes. Managing diabetes successfully requires a broad range of habits and behaviors. According to a model developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) in 2003, there are seven key behaviors that define a healthy lifestyle with diabetes; these are known as the AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors. They are (1) healthy eating, (2) being active, (3) monitoring, (4) taking medications, (5) problem-solving, (6) healthy coping, and (7) reducing risks. Some of these behaviors, such as healthy eating, are pretty self-explanatory, while others may benefit from a bit more explanation. For example, “monitoring” includes not just blood glucose monitoring but also tracking your blood pressure, weight, and foot health, as well as the number of steps you’ve walked throughout the day (to ensure that you’re getting enough physical activity). “Reducing risks” also encompasses a broad group of behaviors, including but not limited to smoking cessation, self-inspection of feet, maintaining up-to-date personal health records, and having regular eye, foot, and dental exams. Reducing risks also includes keeping track of and following instructions from your health-care team. This article focuses on common physical limitations, particularly those that can affe Continue reading >>

The Meter That Says It All

The Meter That Says It All

Easy. Accurate. Safe. The feature-rich no coding Embrace meter delivers fast, accurate results using a very small blood sample, and with the talking feature you have the option to hear your results as well as see them. Instant Three-Step Verification ensures accurate results every time. The Embrace Better Care Program is a proactive care program from Omnis Health designed to help you take better care of your diabetes. It provides access to diabetes educational materials, product information, special offers, money-savings coupons, and more. Click here to learn more. The EmbraceIt Mobile App At the heart of the Embrace Better Care Program is the EmbraceIt Mobile App. It’s the easiest way to Embrace Better Care and share your test results with your healthcare provider. Download Now on the iTunes and Google Play stores. With a direct link to Health2Sync though the EmbraceIt app, you can share results by manually entering your test results or using the Smart Cable to upload data on your mobile device. To order a Smart Cable ($16.95 + $3 S&H, tax may apply in some states), please fill out this form, call an Omnis Health Product Care Specialist at 877-979-5454, or visit Amazon.com. Note: If you do not have a compatible mobile device, you can download a PC portal for your desktop/laptop PC. You can view data uploaded via the PC Portal by signing directly into the Health2Sync web app. Continue reading >>

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

Choose Your Blood Glucose Meter Wisely! These days, there is lots of emphasis on accuracy, particularly when it comes to continuous glucose monitors (and their ability to match blood glucose values) and insulin pumps (and their ability to deliver doses with extreme precision). But let’s not forget about that trusty, dusty blood glucose meter that has been a staple of diabetes management. Why is meter accuracy so important? For those who take rapid-acting insulin to cover meals and “correct” out-of-range blood sugar readings, accurate readings are necessary for determining the right dose. Inaccurate readings can lead to over- or under-dosing, which can produce dangerously high or low blood sugar results. An inaccurate meter can also cause a person to treat hypoglycemia inappropriately (if the meter reads too low) or miss the need for treatment (if the meter reads too high). And finally, with so many people using CGM systems, proper calibration is a must. The more accurate the fingerstick readings, the better the CGM will perform. Of course, no meter will provide accurate results if the user fails to use proper technique. That means: Making sure the finger (or other test area) is clean Using the test strips prior to their expiration date Keep the strips sealed in their bottle to prevent exposure to light and humidity Applying enough blood to fill the test strip completely. Never exposing the strips to extreme hot or cold temperatures. Coding the meter (if required) Our team believes that meters should be within 10% of lab values to be considered accurate. One of the more important things you can do to ensure accurate results is to choose the right meter. Blood glucose meters vary widely in terms of accuracy. Accuracy is determined by comparing measurements obtained Continue reading >>

Beyond The Finger: Alternate Blood Sugar Testing Sites

Beyond The Finger: Alternate Blood Sugar Testing Sites

If you’re tired of the pain of finger sticking and the calluses that can develop over time, alternate site testing could be an option for blood sugar testing, especially for those who want to do frequent checks. In a study published in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, researchers compared patients’ satisfaction with fingertip blood sugar testing and testing using an alternate site, in this case the palm of the hand. They found that people who test their blood sugar levels four times a day like the idea of using alternative site testing approaches. However, they also found that testing on their palm with regular lancing supplies didn’t always provide easy access to get enough blood for a test strip. Managing Diabetes With Alternate Site Testing: The Choices “The palm of the hand is good because it’s capillary blood and it’s going to be current blood sugar,” said certified diabetes educator Sacha Uelmen, RD, program director of the outpatient diabetes education program at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor. Your thumb is another option if you’re tired of using fingers. Other possible locations include the thigh, calf, upper arm, and forearm. However, sites other than your palm are recommended only if your blood sugar is stable at the time of testing. Certified diabetes educator Hector Verastigui, RN, clinical research coordinator at the Texas Diabetes Institute in San Antonio, said he teaches patients to test using their arms as an option if they are interested in alternate site testing. However, there are disadvantages to this method as well. “Most patients that I teach alternative site testing will say that forearm testing is less painful but difficult to obtain a blood sample, and most patients will return to fingerti Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Meters

Best Blood Glucose Meters

If you use a blood glucose meters from one of the big four meter companies to check your level four times a day, you will probably pay anywhere from $1,700 to $2,300 each year. But if instead you test with a meter and strips from one of the "big box" stores, you would be out of pocket only about $600 to $800. This is a useful bit of information from the latest Consumer Reports review of the "Best Blood Glucose Meters." The magazine rates 21 meters in a brief article of one chart and five paragraphs in less than a page in its November 2012 issue. The big box stores that sell some of the least expensive meters and test strips are Wal-Mart and Target. Wal-Mart has offered its ReliOn brand for years, but Target now offers its Up & Up brand. Still, the wide price gap may be misleading. Each of the big four – LifeScan, Roche, Bayer, and Abbott – offer programs that can provide some of us test strips for considerably less. Most people with diabetes will find the report, however brief, useful. It’s already on newsstands and, better yet, on the shelves of most libraries. What Consumer Reports says is important. Published by the nonprofit Consumers Union and containing no ads, this is one of our largest circulation magazines. Two years ago it had a circulation of 7.3 million copies, according to a review of the magazine in The Wall Street Journal. The magazine regularly reviews these meters, the most important tool that we have for managing our blood sugar. Four years ago I wrote here about its review of 13 meters from eight different manufacturers. Other magazines also review our meters, notably Diabetes Forecast. Their review this past January provides some useful information, but it makes a point of noting that, "Diabetes Forecast doesn’t test or recommend products." M Continue reading >>

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