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Best Diabetes Campaign

About The National Diabetes Education Program

About The National Diabetes Education Program

The National Diabetes and Education Program (NDEP) works collaboratively with its partners at the federal, state, and local levels to improve the treatment and outcomes for people with diabetes, promote early diagnosis, and prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. NDEP is jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Strategic Plan for 2014-2019 – NDEP’s strategic plan outlines its goals, objectives, and strategies. Executive Committee and Groups – NDEP’s committees and groups provide input and guidance for NDEP activities. Partner and Community Organizations – NDEP collaborates with its partners to achieve shared goals. NDEP’s History NDEP was founded in 1997 to translate the findings of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) , which showed—that improved blood glucose levels can make a big difference in reducing complications associated diabetes. Since then NDEP has worked to translate findings of other major studies into practice including, but not limited to: United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) – In response to the findings of the UKPDS, NDEP outreach evolved to address the ABCs of diabetes: comprehensive control of blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Follow-up to the DCCT and UKPDS studies – In response to the findings of the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, which continues to monitor DCCT patients over time, and the UKPDS 10-year follow up study, the NDEP encouraged early identification and management of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes to reduce eye, kidney, nerve, heart, and blood vessel complications. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) study and Continue reading >>

“it’s About Time” We Knew The Early Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

“it’s About Time” We Knew The Early Signs Of Type 1 Diabetes

“It’s About Time” for National Diabetes Week It is National Diabetes Week from 9-15 July and Diabetes Australia’s "It’s About Time" campaign aims to raise awareness about the importance of early detection and early treatment for all types of diabetes. Too many Australians are being diagnosed with diabetes too late. The is true for both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. The delay in diagnosis is putting many people at risk of major life threatening health problems. “It’s About Time” we detected all types of diabetes earlier and save lives. Too many Australians are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes too late, over 600 people end up in hospital emergency rooms each year very sick, and then find out they have type 1 diabetes. Find out more here Up to 500,000 Australians may have silent , undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. They may have type 2 diabetes for up to seven years before it is diagnosed. During this time type 2 diabetes may be damaging their blood vessels and nerves and causing vision loss, amputations, heart attacks, stroke and kidney damage. Find out more here Diabetes Australia needs your help to support the campaign and spread the word. Ways to support our “It’s About Time” campaign Share our videos which you can download here Share social media tiles and posts Download the type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes posters and display them in your workplace or community Use the hashtags #itsabouttime #ndw2017 Write to your local MP and tell them what it is like to live with diabetes or to care for someone with diabetes Donate to Diabetes Australia here and fund important diabetes research National Diabetes Week July 9-15 2017 www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/itsabouttime Continue reading >>

First-of-its-kind Psa Campaign Targets The 86 Million American Adults With Prediabetes

First-of-its-kind Psa Campaign Targets The 86 Million American Adults With Prediabetes

First-of-its-Kind PSA Campaign Targets the 86 Million American Adults with Prediabetes American Diabetes Association, American Medical Association, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Ad Council Join Forces to Reduce the Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes, One of Fastest Growing Public Health Crises Today Losing weight and being healthier are at the top of everyone's New Year's resolutions. But, despite the best intentions, work, kids, and social events often push lifestyle changes to the bottom of the list. While many are familiar with type 2 diabetes, fewer are aware of prediabetes, a serious health condition that affects 86 million Americans (more than 1 in 3) and often leads to type 2 diabetes. In an effort to raise awareness and help those with prediabetes know where they stand and how to prevent type 2 diabetes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the American Medical Association (AMA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have partnered with the Ad Council to launch the first national public service advertising (PSA) campaign about prediabetes. The PSA campaign was developed pro bono by Ogilvy & Mather New York. Nearly 90 percent of people with prediabetes don't know they have it, and aren't aware of the long term risks to their health such as heart attack, stroke, blindness, and amputation. If left untreated, current trends estimate that 15 to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. However, prediabetes often can be reversed through weight loss, diet changes and increased physical activity. Diagnosis is key: research shows that once people are aware of their condition, they are much more likely to make the necessary lifestyle changes. The Type 2 Diabetes Prevention campaign launched Continue reading >>

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

With a little exercise and a change in diet, it often can be reversed. Let's face it, there are millions of reasons why we don't find the time to make healthy lifestyle choices. Kids, jobs, cat videos on the Internet — we're busy. But whatever your reason, prediabetes is real. So find out if you have prediabetes by taking the test now. You won't regret it. Join the National DPP You're not alone in this. There are hundreds of Diabetes Prevention Programs in local communities that are proven to help people with prediabetes make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. We're sure there's one that's right for you. "But I'm a busy mom...I don't have time to eat right and exercise!" Yes, making lifestyle changes may seem hard. But it doesn’t have to be. In fact, some of them can even be fun. Continue reading >>

Let's Outsmart Diabetes

Let's Outsmart Diabetes

That's exactly what Prevention is going to help you do. We are dedicating 2013 to raising diabetes awareness across the country and providing cutting-edge news and information about what diabetes is, important risk factors, how to prevent the disease, how to talk to your doctor, and natural ways to reverse the illness or at least reduce your need for medication. Each month, look for the Let's Outsmart Diabetes logo, and you'll learn about one habit you can tweak to reduce your risks. We believe that type 2 diabetes deserves this kind of campaign because, along with the unprecedented numbers at risk, the disease is working its way through a new demographic. "It used to be a disease of old age," says Geralyn Spollett, the American Diabetes Association's president of health care and education. "Now the fastest-growing age group for new cases is 45 to 55." It's also deadly. On average, diabetes can rob you of six years of life, estimates a 2011 international multicenter study of more than 800,000 people, published in the New England Journal of Medicine. We're committed to making 2013 the year we start to defeat diabetes because we know it can be done. The power is in your hands. "More than 90% of type 2 diabetes is preventable, simply by adopting a healthier lifestyle," says Mark Hyman, MD, the author of the best-selling book The Blood Sugar Solution. For example, swapping out just a third of a serving of white rice for brown every day can lower your risks by 16%, according to a Harvard study. More from Prevention: 14 Superfoods For Diabetics [pagebreak] The best place to intervene is in the detectable process that precedes a diagnosis. It's called prediabetes, a condition that occurs when the body develops "insulin resistance." Insulin is the hormone that helps your cells Continue reading >>

Awareness Campaign For Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease Risk Launches

Awareness Campaign For Type 2 Diabetes, Heart Disease Risk Launches

Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly are launching a campaign dubbed “For Your SweetHeart” that aims to raise awareness about the risk for heart disease in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a press release from the companies. A recent national survey that included more than 500 Americans with type 2 diabetes patients found that 52% did not understand that they are at increased risk for heart disease and related life-threatening events, such as heart attack and stroke, according to the release. The campaign encourages people with type 2 diabetes to talk to their health care provider and loved ones about their heart disease risk. The campaign also includes a quiz for patients to learn more about their risk. “The truth is cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes, but there is hope. The earlier people with diabetes understand this risk, the sooner they become engaged and take action to help reduce their chances of heart attacks, strokes or even death,” Paul Fonteyne, president and CEO of Boehringer Ingelheim, said in the release. “Educating the public about this important health crisis is just another component of our responsibility and commitment to delivering the best care for people with type 2 diabetes. We hope this initiative will encourage people to take action, not only for themselves, but also for their sweethearts,” Mike Mason, vice president of U.S., Lilly Diabetes, said in the release. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Overview More than one in three American adults have prediabetes and are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a serious health condition that can lead to heart attack and stroke. Surprisingly, nearly 90 percent of people with prediabetes don't even know they have it. But prediabetes can be reversed through weight loss, diet changes and increased physical activity. The first step to reversing the condition is evaluating one's personal risk so that they can take action as soon as possible. In the first-ever national prediabetes awareness campaign, new PSAs assert that no matter how busy life may be, no one is excused from prediabetes. The campaign encourages people to learn their risk of type 2 diabetes by taking a short online test at DoIHavePrediabetes.org, which also features information about prediabetes as well as lifestyle programs and tips to help people reverse their risk. Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Ad Campaign Cost Less Than A Test Strip!

New Diabetes Ad Campaign Cost Less Than A Test Strip!

New Diabetes Ad Campaign Cost Less Than a Test Strip! New Diabetes Ad Campaign Cost Less Than a Test Strip! Email addresses will not be shared with 3rd parties. See privacy policy We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Six smiling faces of fellow people with diabetes stare out from the pages of BusinessWeek, each in support of the message displayed in big white letters: "Type 1 diabetes tests us. Every day." In black letters below the collage, the second half of the message: "But JDRF has our backs." The rest of the ad is a pitch for the JDRF, mentioning how diabetes tests the patience of every PWD and our families and impacts our outlook, but how those at the 42-year-old organization are also testing themselves every day to help fund research that could prevent, treat, and possibly cure type 1 diabetes. So that someday, "we won't have to." This ad ran in Bloomberg News-owned BusinessWeek magazine's Sept. 10 issue of their North American edition and also in the Oct. 1 issue of the New York and Washington D.C. metro editions. This is JDRF's second ad campaign running in top-tier mainstream media in less than a year, but it takes a detour from the more biting and controversial ad that ran in November 2011. In that ad appearing in the New York Times and Washington Post , the JDRF took a "shock and awe" approach by stating that 1 in 20 people with diabetes, like the girl named Piper pictured in the ad, would die from a low blood sugar. The ad specifically stated that the FDA could help prevent this from happening through technology it approves. The new one certainly has a different tone. But still, many of us might be questioning its purpose and whether it's wor Continue reading >>

World Health Organization Launches Beat Diabetes Awareness Campaign

World Health Organization Launches Beat Diabetes Awareness Campaign

To learn more about the Beat Diabetes campaign, visit the World Health Organizations website , and to learn about the Diabetes Prevention Program, see the article Medicares New Diabetes Prevention Programs. And to find participating Y near you, visit the YMCA website . This blog entry was written by Senior Digital Editor Diane Fennell. Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor. All comments are moderated and there may be a delay in the publication of your comment. Please be on-topic and appropriate. Do not disclose personal information. Be respectful of other posters. Only post information that is correct and true to your knowledge. When referencing information that is not based on personal experience, please provide links to your sources. All commenters are considered to be nonmedical professionals unless explicitly stated otherwise. Promotion of your own or someone else's business or competing site is not allowed: Sharing links to sites that are relevant to the topic at hand is permitted, but advertising is not. Once submitted, comments cannot be modified or deleted by their authors. Comments that don't follow the guidelines above may be deleted without warning. Such actions are at the sole discretion of DiabetesSelfManagement.com. Comments are moderated Monday through Friday Continue reading >>

Campaigns - Wales | Diabetes Uk

Campaigns - Wales | Diabetes Uk

Our campaigns depend on your support. When we work alongside people with diabetes in Wales, we can change things for the better. Here's some information of some of our recent campaigns as well as ways you can get involved. Join our network of campaigners: Diabetes Voices Our Diabetes Voices make a difference by campaigning for us and influencing decision makers and service providers in Wales, to make sure every person with diabetes gets the best treatment and services. We know some children with Type 1 diabetes get excellent support in school, but this is not the case for everyone. We are working hard to make sure that all children with diabetes get the support they need to reach their full potential with our Make the Grade campaign . Our Know Type 1 campaign is raising awareness of the common symptoms of Type 1 diabetes, known as the 4Ts (Toilet, Thirsty, Tired, Thinner), to make sure children in Wales are diagnosed sooner and more safely. Make sure you know how to care for your feet to help avoid complications like ulcers and amputations. Continue reading >>

Sanofi Highlights Blood Sugar 'balancing Act' In Newest U.k. Diabetes Campaign

Sanofi Highlights Blood Sugar 'balancing Act' In Newest U.k. Diabetes Campaign

Sanofi highlights blood sugar 'balancing act' in newest U.K. diabetes campaign Sanofi's newest U.K. diabetes campaign is all about balance. What does a tightrope-walking stunt have to do with diabetes? One word: balance. Thats the message Sanofi is trying to get across with its new U.K. diabetes awareness campaign , dubbed Highs & Lows: Better balance for a better futurewhich, yes, did include a tightrope stunt at Londons Southbank. According to new research from the company, more than half of diagnosed, insulin-taking Type 2 diabetes patients find it challenging to balance their blood glucose levels or worry about doing it. But if they dont, those challenges and worries can lead to potentially serious long-term health implications. Like this story? Subscribe to FiercePharma! Biopharma is a fast-growing world where big ideas come along daily. Our subscribers rely on FiercePharma as their must-read source for the latest news, analysis and data on drugs and the companies that make them. Sign up today to get pharma news and updates delivered to your inbox and read on the go. Type 2 patients are making fear-driven decisions in the here and now to prevent low blood glucose levels, without considering that high blood glucose levels can have serious implications on their health in the future as well. They need more support in order to be successful at this blood sugar balancing act, Max Pemberton, a London-based general practitioner and psychiatrist, said in a statement. Enter Sanofis new campaign, which Sanofi UK medical therapy expert Mike Baxter says is meant to help patients feel motivated to seek the help that they may need to navigate that balancing act. The effort includes a website complete with a blood-sugar checklist, a discussion guide patients can use with their d Continue reading >>

Diabetes Pr Pitfalls To Avoid And Tips For Better Diabetes Communications

Diabetes Pr Pitfalls To Avoid And Tips For Better Diabetes Communications

Diabetes PR Pitfalls to Avoid and Tips for Better Diabetes Communications Media and PR alarm about diabetes weakens advocacy and awareness The month of November is recognized as Diabetes Awareness month, and today, November 14th, has been named World Diabetes Day by the International Federation for Diabetes and the WHO. Public health authorities, non-profits, communications professionals and journalists use this time and the weeks leading up to it to organize, focus, and amplify messages about the state of diabetes, prevention and the efforts being made to address the epidemic. More often than not, however, negative and over-simplified messaging outweighs positive messages, diluting the impact of potentially powerful diabetes health communications. Prevailing rhetoric around the epidemic is wrought with simplistic, sometimes forceful language, graphic imagery, and what many would consider to be sobering figures to describe the risks associated with the disease. Media outlets casually use terms such as ticking time-bomb and silent killer to allude to diabetes in their stories. Press offices and media frequently peddle out variations of the same terrifying statistics and morbid examples of injury to illustrate the potentially devastating effects of unchecked Diabetes. While the realities of unmanaged diabetes are to be reckoned with, the imbalanced portrayal of diabetes propagates varying levels of fear, suspicion, and eventually, indifference. Often, this type of messaging rests on an intended shock-factor that aims to scare people into submitting to healthier lifestyles. Fear appeals, however, have been proven to be ineffective by a number of studies . These tell us that fear-induced activism is ineffective at worst, and unsustainable at best. Additionally, the use of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Uk - 4 T's Campaign - Neo

Diabetes Uk - 4 T's Campaign - Neo

Not often, but sometimes, just sometimes the best ideas are the ones you arrive at almost instantly. That was the case with this campaign for Diabetes UK. Diabetes UK is the UKs leading diabetes charity. They help people manage diabetes and fund pioneering research into care, cure and prevention. To mark World Diabetes Day 2012, they wanted a public facing campaign to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes among parents and healthcare professionals. Early diagnosis of Type 1 is crucial. It means the condition can be managed before it gets deadly undetected, Type 1 can rapidly case diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a serious and potentially fatal complication of diabetes. Type 1 is a complex condition but complexity doesnt make for a great campaign. The campaign needed to quickly and memorably communicate the key signs of Type 1 diabetes in children, namelyfeeling more tired and thirsty than usual, losing weight and, the most telling one, needing to wee a lot. Its all the Ts then? Thirsty, tired, thinner.toilet? said Emma, one of our junior creatives at the time. And that was how the 4Ts campaign was born. As is often the way, you feel you should come up with more ideas. Something smarter, harder. Something that just wasnt quite so easy. And we did. Yet nothing came close to the 4Ts it just worked. Diabetes UK agreed and we took the 4Ts forward into national press and TV ads. The words tired, thirsty, thinner and toilet written in fridge magnets could be found in doctors surgeries and Parent & Child magazines across the UK. We found it almost bemusing that something so simple could work so well. Yet it did. Within the first few days of the campaigns launch, the Diabetes UK website received a total of 158,617 unique visitors on the day of launch, there w Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

World Diabetes Day 2017: Women And Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic, metabolic disease characterized by elevated levels of blood glucose (or blood sugar), which leads over time to serious damage to the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. The most common is type 2 diabetes, usually in adults, which occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or doesn't make enough insulin. In the past three decades the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in countries of all income levels. Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin by itself. For people living with diabetes, access to affordable treatment, including insulin, is critical to their survival. There is a globally agreed target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity by 2025. Continue reading >>

When It Comes To Diabetes, Will Marketers Break With Tradition?

When It Comes To Diabetes, Will Marketers Break With Tradition?

When it comes to diabetes, will marketers break with tradition? When it comes to diabetes, will marketers break with tradition? The fiercely competitive diabetes drug market is in line for a dramatic overhaul, one that would place more emphasis than ever on the well-being of the consumer. As diabetes strengthens its grasp on America's health, what's needed most is messaging that targets those at risk for the complex disease and better tools for those already diagnosed. Many marketers believe diabetes patients have already started benefiting from the unprecedented volume of disease-awareness campaigns plucked straight from the clutches of pharma marketers' budgets. At the same time, others doubt pharma's ability to break from tradition. See also: Lexicon developing type 1 diabetes treatment with Sanofi Are drug manufacturers shying away from these efforts because they're worried the well of diabetes patients will dry up? Top executives have been vocal about their wish that marketers would recognize diabetes as a continually growing market. Contrary to diseases such as muscular dystrophy where virtually every patient is enrolled in a clinical trial the diabetes landscape is vast and the need is great. As the number of people diagnosed with diabetes continues to surge, ad dollars are being spent at a staggering rate. One Sanofi television spot explains the company's once-daily injectable Toujeo will help people get their groove back. According to iSpot.tv data, Sanofi shelled out $30.2 million on Toujeo TV ad time in 2015, its first year on the airwaves. Similarly, TV ad spending for Johnson & Johnson's Invokana nearly tripled, from $35.2 million in 2014 to $101.2 million in 2015, according to iSpot.tv. Full-year sales of Invokana spiked 118% in the same period, perhaps s Continue reading >>

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