diabetestalk.net

Best Cream Cheese For Diabetics

Carrot Cake With Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting

Carrot Cake With Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting

Carrot Cake with Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting Carrot Cake with Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting Makes: 14 to 16 servings 3 cups finely* shredded carrot (about 6 medium) 1 cup refrigerated or frozen egg product, thawed, or 4 eggs, lightly beaten 1/2 cup granulated sugar or sugar substitute blend** equivalent to 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1/2 cup packed brown sugar or brown sugar substitute blend** equivalent to 1/2 cup brown sugar Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease and lightly flour two 8x1-1/2- or 9x1-1/2-inch round cake pans; line bottom of pans with waxed paper or parchment paper. Grease and lightly flour the waxed paper or parchment paper and the sides of the pans. Set aside. In a large bowl, stir together flour, flax seed meal, baking powder, pumpkin pie spice, baking soda, and salt; set aside. In another large bowl, combine finely shredded carrot, eggs, granulated sugar, brown sugar, and oil. Add egg mixture all at once to flour mixture. Stir until combined. Divide batter evenly among prepared pans, spreading evenly. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes for 8-inch pans, 20 to 25 minutes for 9-inch pans, or until a toothpick inserted near centers of the cakes comes out clean. Cool cakes in pans on wire racks for 10 minutes. Invert cakes onto wire racks. Cool completely. Place one cooled cake layer on a serving platter. Top with half of the Fluffy Cream Cheese Frosting. Place the second cake layer atop the frosting; spread with the remaining frosting. If desired, garnish with coarsely shredded carrot. Makes 14 to 16 servings. * Be sure to finely shred the carrots to prevent them from sinking to the bottom of the pan during baking. **Sugar Substitutes: Choose Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking to substitute for the granulated sugar and Splenda Brown Sugar Baking Blend to substitute fo Continue reading >>

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

NEW! Download our free grocery shopping companions: Free Foods – a guide to foods that won’t impact your blood sugar 15 Carbs Snack List – a mega-list of great snack ideas What’s the best snack for someone with diabetes? A snack with few carbs! (There are some exceptions. If you are planning on working out or have low blood sugar, than some carbohydrates may be beneficial.) Here are our top 23 favorite low-carb snacks in no particular order: Peanut butter Cheddar cheese String cheese Cottage cheese Broccoli with melted cheese Salad with free veggies and low-carb dressing Tomato and mozzarella salad Celery with peanut butter Fresh strawberries or blueberries with low-fat plain yogurt Veggies with hummus Cucumbers with olive-oil and rice vinegar Carrot sticks Snap peas with Caesar dressing Green beans cooked and cooled with lemon juice Nuts Sauteed Spinach Pickles Rotisserie chicken Deli meat Pepperoni and cheese Beef jerky Hard boiled eggs What are your favorites? You can get more snack ideas in our recipes forum, diabetes cookbook, and the Simply Cooking blog. Further reading on diabetes diet: Read more about low blood glucose/sugar (hypoglycemia), low-carb diet, snacks. Continue reading >>

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Is Cheese Safe For People With Diabetes?

Compared with many other foods, cheese is high in fat and calories and may not be an obvious choice for someone with diabetes. Cheese and diabetes can, however, be a healthful combination. Cheese lovers can enjoy a wide variety of cheeses without elevating blood sugar, raising blood pressure, or gaining weight. For diabetes-friendly meals or snacks, people should choose healthful cheeses and serve them with foods that are rich in fiber and low in calories. Can people with diabetes eat cheese? People with diabetes can safely eat cheese as part of a balanced, healthful diet. Just as with other foods, moderation is the key. A diet mainly consisting of cheese is unhealthy for anyone. When selecting cheeses, people with diabetes need to consider a few things: Calories Cheese is very high in calories and fat. Though calorie content varies among cheese varieties, people with diabetes should avoid overindulging in cheese. Type 2 diabetes is linked with obesity, and losing just a few pounds can reduce the risk of diabetes. There are several steps that people with diabetes can take to help them eat cheese without gaining weight: stick to small servings choose lower-calorie cheeses use cheese as a source of flavor rather than as the main course Saturated fat Cheese is high in saturated fat compared with many other foods. In small quantities, saturated fat is harmless and can actually be beneficial to the body. But excessive intake of saturated fats is linked to weight gain, high cholesterol, gallbladder problems, and heart disease. The American Heart Association recommend a diet that contains no more than 5-6 percent saturated fat. That means that in a 2,000 calorie diet, no more than 120 calories or 13 grams (g) should come from saturated fats. Other experts advise no more than 1 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Pumpkin Cream Cheese Squares

Diabetic Pumpkin Cream Cheese Squares

For the filling, whisk together cream cheese, Splenda and egg until well blended; set aside. For the batter, combine the pumpkin, Splenda, egg, and oil; mix well. Stir in flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger. Pour into prepared pan. Drizzle cream cheese mixture over batter. Cut through batter with knife several times for a marbled effect. Bake 25-30 minutes or until a tester inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool; cut into squares. Continue reading >>

The Joys Of Cream Cheese....

The Joys Of Cream Cheese....

Cream cheese…the yummy decadent cheese that can be made sweet…and turned into a cheesecake…or savory…and made into a filling for a wonderful omelet…I love it…and find a way to eat it several times a week…today was a omelet with an onion and chive cream cheese filling…oh yeah baby…tell me ..what is your favorite way to eat this yummy low carb cheese…my grand children both ate up their omelet this afternoon…so I am on the lookout for new ideas… Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cream Cheese Pancakes

Diabetic Cream Cheese Pancakes

**Note: I found this recipe originally at bestrecipesmagazine.com This is a simple breakfast recipe that I enjoy preparing in various ways. My favorite is using a 6" skillet, and making them as you would a typical crepe. Spoon a little light yogurt of your choice down the center, add some fresh chopped fruit, and roll up like an omelet bar. Lightly drizzle with honey or sugar free syrup. Ingredients Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

20 Delicious Low-sugar Snacks

20 Delicious Low-sugar Snacks

Try these strategic snacks for losing weight and keeping blood sugar in check. Celery Sticks and Cream Cheese Though it’s not as high in protein as cottage cheese or peanut butter, cream cheese is a soft, spreadable cheese that can be a satisfying addition to a snack of celery sticks (or another crisp veggie). Regular cream cheese is very high in fat, so make sure to choose a reduced-fat brand and limit your portion to two tablespoons to keep your calorie-level in check. 80 calories, 2 g carbohydrates Exchanges: 1.5 fat Previous Next More Photos Sugar Free Gelatin Sunflower Seeds Continue reading >>

Dairy

Dairy

Tweet Diary foods are a popular dietary choice and with low fat and lactose free dairy available, there’s more choice for those following different diets. Dairy products have long been thought to be good for bones, however, there are differing views on this health benefit. Which foods count as dairy? Dairy foods are those which are derived animal milk and include: Milk Cream Yoghurt Cheese Butter Unsweetened dairy products tend to be a popular choice amongst people following low carbohydrate diets. Health benefits of dairy food Diary foods contain a good source of calcium, protein and vitamin B12. The National Osteoporosis Society recommends a daily intake of 700mg of calcium for adults. This is roughly equivalent to the calcium content in a pint of milk with other sources of calcium including: Beans Dark green vegetables such as kale and broccoli Fish with edible bones such as sardines and salmon Protein is important for muscle repair and growth and vitamin B12 is good for the nervous system. Health risks of dairy food Lactose intolerance is relatively common and has been found to be more prevalent in people of Asian and African-Caribbean descent. Classic symptoms of lactose intolerance include stomach pains or cramps, feeling bloated or experiencing flatulence or diarrhoea after having dairy products. A number of lactose free products are now available in most large supermarkets. Full fat dairy foods have relatively high calorie contents so should be eaten in moderation. Low fat and dairy products made from skimmed milk offer a lower calorie alternative. Despite often being touted as good for our bones, some health groups, including the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in the US, note that whilst research has shown calcium to be good for bones, the bene Continue reading >>

What Snacks Are Good For Someone With Diabetes?

What Snacks Are Good For Someone With Diabetes?

What snacks are good for someone with diabetes? D.D. Family T1 since 9/05, pump since 4/06, CGMS since 10/07 What snacks are good for someone with diabetes? Such a seemingly simple question can have so many different answers, it's amazing! For starters- let's look at some basics of understanding how blood sugar is controlled. Food, namely, carbohydrates, raise blood sugar. Things like insulin and exercise lower blood sugar. Everyone with diabetes has a different way they balance these factors, making diabetes a very one size does NOT fit all disease. If you're on an insulin pump or an MDI regimen where you count carbohydrates, pretty much anything goes as far as snacks. The flexibility of these regimens means you can eat what you want when you want. However, some things will still produce a pronounced spike in blood sugar, thanks to simple carbohydrates. For this reason, things like regular soda or juice are hard to work in if you're not experiencing low blood sugar at that point in time. If you are experiencing low blood sugar, simple carbs are great though! While you may be able to cover anything with insulin, keep in mind the basics of a healthy diet! Some people use insulin, like NPH, that peaks at a certain time and therefore necessitates snacking during the peaking. If that's the case, it's important the snack has a consistent amount of carbohydrates- enough to balance this peak and prevent low blood sugar without going too high though. Still other people are using diet and exercise or oral medications to manage their diabetes. For these people, snacks don't have to follow such a prescribed regimen, but still are a part of life and need to be fitted in with diabetes. Keep in mind that carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Nothing needs to be outright banned, but moder Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: You Can Eat Cheese (as Long As It’s These Types)

Diabetes Update: You Can Eat Cheese (as Long As It’s These Types)

There are over four million people in the UK with diabetes, and 90 per cent of them have type 2. According to Diabetes UK, sufferers should follow a healthy, balanced diet which helps to control blood glucose, blood fats and blood pressure, as well as maintaining a healthy weight. It’s to reduce risk of complications with the condition, such as heart disease and stroke. Along with starchy foods, cheese might seem like it should be off limits to diabetics too since it’s high in fat and calories. A 2012 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found it could reduce diabetes risk by 12 per cent. But not only is it safe for sufferers to consume, it’s actually beneficial. A 2012 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found it could reduce diabetes risk by 12 per cent. The researchers discovered those who ate just 55g of cheese - roughly two slices - per day got the health benefits. They were unable to pin-point exactly why it helped, but cheese has many known positives for diabetics. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. It has a low glycemic index (GI), meaning it releases glucose slowly and won’t trigger a spike. Additionally, it’s high in protein which can keep you satisfied for longer, and specifically reduce the likelihood diabetics will consume too many sugary carbohydrates. However, some cheeses are better than others for sufferers. Varieties low in salt are best for diabetics, because it can elevate blood pressure, triggering or worsening cardiovascular problems. Lower-sodium types include Wensleydale, Emmental, mozzarella and cream cheese, whereas f Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Cheese With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can I Eat Cheese With Type 2 Diabetes?

If you have diabetes, your body does not metabolize carbohydrates properly, and you have high blood sugar. A healthy diet is an important part of managing your blood sugar levels and preventing diabetes complications. In moderation, cheese can be a regular part of a sensible diet for individuals with this health condition. Video of the Day Following a healthy diet for individuals with diabetes includes consuming controlled amounts of carbohydrates throughout the day. You might have 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates at your meals, and 15 grams of carbohydrates at snacks. An ounce of mozzarella or cheddar each provides less than 1 gram of carbohydrates. For lunch, you could have a whole-grain wrap with cheese and a large apple. As a snack, you could have blue cheese with walnuts and a small piece of fruit. Diabetes, Cheese and Weight Obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. If you have type-2 diabetes and are obese, losing weight can help. Cheese is a high-calorie food, so limit your portion sizes. An ounce of cheddar cheese contains 113 calories. Reduce your calorie consumption by selecting reduced-fat or fat-free cheese instead. An ounce of nonfat cheddar cheese contains 44 calories. To promote weight loss, eat your cheese with low-calorie foods. Have low-fat string cheese and grapes for a snack, or melt shredded nonfat cheddar cheese onto steamed broccoli for a side dish. Cheese and Sodium One main concern with cheese is its high sodium content. An ounce of cheddar cheese has 174 milligrams of sodium. Individuals with diabetes are already at risk for heart disease and kidney disease, and a high-sodium diet further increases the risk. Those with diabetes should have no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. An ounce of low-sodium cheddar cheese has only Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

More in diabetes