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Best Cough Syrup For Diabetics

Watching Your Sugar? Watch Out For Cough Syrup!

Watching Your Sugar? Watch Out For Cough Syrup!

Q Since I have diabetes, should I worry about the sugar in cough and cold medicines? A People with diabetes do need to think twice before buying over-the-counter (OTC) cough, cold and flu medications. Many of these medications contain various forms of sugar, often in the form of high-fructose corn syrup—but the labels don’t state how much sugar the product contains per dose. It’s a dilemma because in some cases the carbs, mostly from sugar, are so high it’s equivalent to a snack—and that affects blood sugar. The products I have investigated vary greatly from having just a few milligrams of carbs per dose to having as much as 24 grams—about as much as you’d find in a Hershey’s chocolate bar! To confuse matters further, some have alcohol in them, which can reduce blood sugar levels…while being sick in the first place can increase blood sugar levels. My first bit of advice: Keep your blood sugar under control when you are well. If your blood sugar is consistently well-managed, an occasional rise in blood sugar from a medication isn’t a concern, and you should be fine taking an OTC medication for a few days. But if your blood sugar is often elevated or is hard to control, be especially careful when buying these medications… Be a carb sleuth. Most cough and cold liquid preparations have some sugar to make them taste better. Look for tell-tale ingredients that spell S-U-G-A-R—high-fructose corn syrup, corn syrup or sucrose. But being listed as an ingredient doesn’t answer how much sugar is in the product. My own informal investigation has found that Robitussin Cough + Chest DM came in very low (0.67 grams (g) of carbs per adult dose) and Delsym Cough 12 Hour Cough Relief was low (3.6 g of carbs per adult dose). But NyQuil Cold & Flu Nighttime Relief Continue reading >>

Cough Syrup

Cough Syrup

I just recently had a cold, my first as a diabetic. And when the symptoms got too bad i did what i always used to do. I took some cough syrup (Benelyn1 all in 1). I took it in the morning before i went to work, and 1/2 hour after i had taken the medicine i started to feel funny. I just thought i was really tired on the ride into work, but as soon as i stepped out of the car ... I couldn't feel my legs , i felt woozy , everything seemed far away or like a dream, and i had loss of memory. It was funny, i was not making any sense when i talked and couldn't understand what people were saying or why they were even at work with me. Its a good thing i didn't drive! that would've been scary , not for me but for the other people on the road. my brother tried to convince me to go the hospital , but in my fuzzy-marble-head state i refused. Him and a few others had to force me to go. I was tripping out bad. i was just wondering if it was because of my insulin , and what type of medicine i can take when i'm sick. it's never happened before, i took the same amount and the same type as i always do. Did you happen to test when feeling "funny"? It sounds similar to symptoms of a low. When you feel abnormal, its a good idea to check your bg just to be on the safe side. The symptoms you were experiencing could have been caused by the medication as some of the things you are experiencing are side effects of the medication. I usually don't take anything when I have a cold or the flu, unless I have a headache or general body aches or a fever, I will take Tylenol or motrin. I find it better to cough up the "junk" and let it run its course than take something which inhibits you to "drain" out the junk. I will increase my fluids (the clearer the better) and monitor my bg's and ketones (if nece Continue reading >>

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release An ingredient found in cough medicine may assist in treating diabetes, according to a new study out of the Heinrich Heine University in Dsseldorf, Germany. According to the study , published in the journal Nature Medicine, dextromethorphan, often listed simply as DM on the labels of cold medications, boosted the release of insulin in mice, human pancreatic tissue samples, and then in a small group of diabetes patients. DM has far fewer side effects than most current type 2 diabetes drugs, which is what prompted the doctors to believe it may be a new potential treatment option. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by very high levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which the cells require to live. But people with type 2 diabetes dont produce enough insulin (which comes from the pancreas and moves glucose out of the blood and into the cells where its needed). As a result, blood sugar remains high, unable to move to the cells. The authors of the study interestingly did not plan on studying dextromethorphan as a potential treatment for diabetes initially; instead, they fell into it by chance. Inspired by previous research, the authors were originally focusing on a disorder called hyperinsulism, which is essentially the opposite of diabetes in that it involves a person having too much insulin. They hypothesized that dextromethorphan would actually lower and suppress insulin release in patients with hyperinsulinism. But while studying it, they discovered that a certain compound thats released as a byproduct of DM, dextrorphan, actually increased insulin release from a patients pancreas thus making it potentially useful in treating type 2 diabetes. The researchers arent entirely sure how it works Continue reading >>

Sugar Free Prescription Cough Medicine!

Sugar Free Prescription Cough Medicine!

Well I managed to get a bottle of sugar free prescription cough medicine! This was no easy task as my doctor did not know what to prescribe and the pharmacy didn't know they had sugar free cough syrup. It seems I was the first person to ever request this! Also you need a paper prescription because it has codeine in it - my doctor first ordered a cough medicine which did not come in sugar free, so I had to go back to the doctor and get a different paper prescription. The pharmacy only has one type which is sugar free and it is called: Guaifenesin/Codine 100-10 mg/5ml SF. I also found over-the-counter sugar free cough medicine, but could only find one type - "Tussin DM". And that only comes in a small container. (Do they think we need less if sugar free or something?) And I found sugar free orange drink which tastes just like orange juice. This is at Walmart in the Kool Aid/soda pop area. It is a powdered drink mix. You can get one packet to make just one glass. So with the cold I have now, my blood sugars are not going through the roof. Nice! I have used the Robutussin DM and it worked for me. I like 4-C products s.f. cranberry/pomegranite drink. Good for you for persisting and achieving prescription sf cough medicine! I, too, hope that you can feel better now and heal quickly. Unfortunately, I can not tolerate any artificial sweeteners. One dose of sf cough medicine and I will have diarrhea all night long. I was finally able to find some Robitussin DM pills that work well, do not raise my bg AND do not cause diarrhea! "My fitness trajectory in my senior years does not have to be a continuous downward slope-- I do have some control over that." --Chrysalis Dx T2; 2005-2014: A1c 6.5-7.0% (ave 6.7) with 2000 mg/day metformin + 40 U/day Lantus. Jan 2015: A1c 7.8%. Reduce ca Continue reading >>

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

What Cold Medicine Is Safe For A Diabetic?

What Cold Medicine Is Safe For A Diabetic?

Guidelines by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) indicate most over-the-counter cough and cold remedies may be ineffective, and doctors suggest that children under 12 do not take these remedies. Still over-the-counter cold medicines abound in the pharmacy. While most people can take any of the cold medication at the prescribed dose without side effects, diabetics have to be careful since cold medication does contain some sugar. However, to cater to a large market, pharmaceutical companies have come up with cold medicine formulas safe for diabetics. Benylin Adult Benylin Adult is a sugar-free and alcohol-free version of the cold medicine popular with patients who have associated cough symptoms as well. The most common ingredient for the formula is dextromethorphan. Robitussin-CF Robitussin-CF with dextromethorphan helps control cold and coughs. It is sugar-free and can safely be used by diabetic patients. Diabetic Products by Scot-Tussin Scot-Tussin products were the first in a line of sugar-free and alcohol-free cold and cough medicines. These are safe for diabetics. Echinacea Combinations A company called Insure makes a natural cold medicine from Echinacea combinations. This is a sugar-free product and helps colds and coughs. However, diabetics should always inform a doctor when they take a medication to ensure there are no interactions with any medication they may be on. Sugar-Free Cough and Cold Drops There are lots of sugar-free cough and cold drops that help soothe the throat when you have a cold. These are available at most stores. Flu Shot The best cold and flu treatment prescribed by doctors is the flu shot at the beginning of winter or end of fall. It helps reduce the intensity of any cold and flu you may get, and it is safe for diabetic patients. Continue reading >>

Dealing With Cough In Diabetics

Dealing With Cough In Diabetics

A constant cough can be disruptive for any person but when it comes to diabetics, it does complicate matters. For starters, a person with diabetes cannot just reach out for any over the counter (OTC) cough syrup because it is likely to be rich in sugar. Secondly, the cough is often the result of a cold and this puts additional stress on the body, causing blood sugar levels to rise. Therefore, dealing with in diabetics requires much greater care and attention. Cold, cough and blood sugar – what’s the link? If the cough and cold is the result of an infection, the body seeks to combat it by releasing greater quantities of hormones to fight the infection. While this is good for people without diabetes, it can create complications for diabetic persons because, as the American Diabetes Association explains, these hormones interfere with the action of insulin in the body. Whether it is the natural insulin produced by the pancreas or the insulin a person receives as part of anti-diabetic therapy, this hormonal interference is likely to result in higher blood sugar levels.[1](Reference) If a diabetic person has and cold that lasts for more than a week, the chronically elevated blood glucose levels can lead to other complications such as where too much acid builds up in the blood.[4](Reference) This makes it even more crucial for diabetics to deal with their cough and cold symptoms at once, without waiting for it to go away on its own. Composition of cough products Like all pharmaceutical formulations, OTC cough syrups contain certain active ingredients (the actual drugs responsible for the therapeutic effect) and some inactive materials (solvents, coloring agents, flavoring agents and preservatives) that help to give a palatable and aesthetic product. Both active as well as Continue reading >>

How To Treat Flu Or Colds With Diabetes

How To Treat Flu Or Colds With Diabetes

Fall and winter are the viruses' delight. Rhinoviruses (colds) and adenoviruses (flus) prey on people huddled close together in cold weather. They also feel right at home on thousands of daily continental and intercontinental flights on which they fly for free. The vast oceans on the earth host uncounted viral hoards, and global warming makes breeding and mutations easier. Adenovirus transmission often goes from wild birds or bats to chickens, then pigs, and finally to humans. Flu season usually begins in early December and winds up in late March, but a 1999 outbreak began in Alaska in September, and unusual summer influenzas have also been seen in some parts of this country over the last few years. On average, adults develop 2 to 3 colds or flus per year, and children as many as 6 to 12. Knowing when to visit the doctor can be tricky. Here are some criteria to help you make an informed decision. Consult your physician if: a cough gets worse instead of better your illness lasts longer than a week your symptoms get worse instead of better a high fever occurs sinus pain, earache, or toothache develops Viral strains change every year, and about every 30 years an especially severe outbreak or pandemic occurs. A very deadly variant appeared during World War ! and became what is now called the Spanish flu pandemic. Some believe it started on March 11, 1918, at an Army training camp in Fort Riley, Kansas. However, an earlier outbreak probably began earlier in 1916 at a large British war camp near Etaples, France, where large numbers of live chickens and pigs were kept in close proximity to thousands of encamped soldiers. By late spring of 1918, the flu had killed 48 soldiers at Fort Riley. The following fall, it reappeared with a vengence in the fall, killing more Americans, E Continue reading >>

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

Diabetes is a condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose (or sugar) in the body. This happens when your body can’t make or use insulin like it’s supposed to. Insulin is a substance that helps your body use the sugar from the food you eat. There are two different types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. People with both types of diabetes need medications to help keep their blood sugar levels normal. The types of drugs that can treat you depend on the type of diabetes you have. This article gives you information about drugs that treat both types of diabetes to help give you an idea of the treatment options available to you. Insulin Insulin is the most common type of medication used in type 1 diabetes treatment. It’s also used in type 2 diabetes treatment. It’s given by injection and comes in different types. The type of insulin you need depends on how severe your insulin depletion is. Options include: Short-acting insulin regular insulin (Humulin and Novolin) Rapid-acting insulins Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulins Combination insulins NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine-insulin aspart) Humalog Mix 75/25 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humalog Mix 50/50 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humulin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Novolin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Ryzodeg (insulin degludec-insulin aspart) Amylinomimetic drug Pramlintide (SymlinPen 120, SymlinPen 60) is an amylinomimetic drug. It’s an injectable drug used before meals. It works by delaying the time your stomach takes to empty itself. It reduces glucagon secretion after meals. This lowers your blood sugar. It also reduces appetite through a central mechanism. Most medications for type 2 diabetes are o Continue reading >>

Recommendation For Sugar Free Cough Meds/drops

Recommendation For Sugar Free Cough Meds/drops

Recommendation for sugar free cough meds/drops Recommendation for sugar free cough meds/drops Hi All! Can somebody recommend sugar-free cough meds/drops? I used to just take 2 tablespoons of honey for coughs but of course that's not an option for me now. I just called to schedule with my PCP but won't be able to see her until end of November. Thanks in advance. D.D. Family Pre-Diabetic since April 2017 Robitussin makes a cough medicine in a pill form. Sometimes you have to ask for it at the pharmacy counter -- not a prescription item though. A few other brands (Alka Seltzer Cold, Mucinex, etc.) also have pill form, sometimes with other meds mixed in, so you may have to choose one that only treats your symptoms. If you want a syrup, there are a few brands with sugar free options: Robitussin, again, Diatussin, etc. Can't say how they taste (I just go for the pill form). Ask the pharmacist for a recommendation, if you can't decide. Diagnosed pre-diabetic in April 2017; treating with lchf diet and exercise. 120 mg Nadolol, Magnesium, pacemaker/ICD implant since Apr 2014 You should be able to find sugar free cough drops at most drug stores. Breathing steam helps. A vaporizer with Vicks is good. Also, an aromatherapy diffuser with cool mist with eucalyptus oil is comforting. Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / what kind of cold medicine can diabetics take article What Kind of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. My mother just found out she has diabetes. What can she take for a cough or cold, since most of the medicines have a lot of sugar? There are a few things I'd like to mention before I get straight to your answer. Ifyour mother's cough is accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever , chills , sore throat , or other systemic symptoms, she should be assessed by a physician. Likewise, is she is coughing up phlegm (sputum) that is thick, green, otherwise has color, or is excessive in amount, she should be seen by a doctor. In addition, if she identifies triggers, such as dander, or pollen , this may be more than a simple cough , and should be investigated. Finally, it is common sense that she and anyone with diabetes (or without diabetes , for that matter) should not smoke. There are over-the-counter remedies available without sugar , and if in doubt, your pharmacist should be able to point you in the right direction. In particular, Benylin Adult is sugar and alcohol free, and provides some relief from a non-productive (dry) cough. This should not be used in conjunction with MAOIs , in pregnancy or in nursing mothers. The active ingredient inthis formula is Dextromethorphan, and it is PPA (phenylpropanolamine) free. Another possibilityis Robitussin CF. This preparation has been re-formulate Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

Managing Diabetes With A Cold Or Flu

The cold and flu season is on its way. And while sick days bring everyone down, people with type 2 diabetes have some special considerations when they're under the weather. In addition to choosing the right cold medications and checking in with your doctor about possible dosage changes, good diabetes care means being prepared for the days when you would rather not drag yourself out of bed for a glucose check or a snack. Pick the Right Cold Medicine “A lot of [cold and flu] medications, particularly cough syrup, are high in glucose,” says internist Danny Sam, MD, the program director of the residency program at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, Calif. His practice specializes in adult diabetes. If you have diabetes, your best bet is a medicine that is clearly labeled sugar-free. Almost every major pharmacy has a store brand of sugar-free cold or cough medicine, says Dr. Sam. If you have questions, ask your pharmacist for help. Check Blood Sugar Often “Diabetes is not as well controlled when you are sick,” observes Sam. This is because when your body fights infection, it releases a chemical cascade that can alter your body’s glucose and insulin response. As a result, you may need to check your blood sugar more often than you usually do. People with type 2 diabetes may need to check their blood sugar four times a day, and should check their urine for ketones anytime their blood sugar level is higher than 300 mg/dL. Other medications you may need to take when you are sick can affect your blood sugar levels: Aspirin may lower blood sugar levels Certain antibiotics may decrease blood sugar levels in those taking some oral diabetes medications Decongestants may raise blood sugar levels Adjust Your Plan “You have to monitor your blood sugar more frequently and you m Continue reading >>

Cough And Cold Products For Patients With Diabetes

Cough And Cold Products For Patients With Diabetes

Ms. Terrie is a clinical pharmacy writer based in Haymarket, Virginia. Currently, a variety of OTC cough and cold products are available on the market to meet the specific needs of the diabetes patient population. Pharmacists can assist patients with diabetes by making them aware of the availability of these specialized cough and cold products, as well as guide them in the proper selection of OTC products. These specialized products are available in various formulations that include liquids, tablets, and lozenges for both the adult and pediatric patient populations. Many of the cough and cold products marketed for the diabetic population are formulated as free of sugar, alcohol, dextrose, sucrose, sorbitol, sodium, fructose, glycerin, and dyes. Prior to recommending the use of any OTC products to patients with diabetes, pharmacists should evaluate the patient?s current allergy/medical history and drug profile to prevent potential drug interactions and/or contraindications, as well as ascertain if self-treatment is appropriate. Furthermore, pharmacists should always counsel patients on the proper use of these products and remind patients to always adhere to the manufacturer?s directions and warnings listed on the product?s label and to avoid the use of medications that contain sugar or alcohol when possible. During patient counseling, pharmacists should advise patients to consult a pharmacist or their primary health care provider before using any OTC products, including alternative/complementary medications or supplements, to determine if they are appropriate to use. Patients also should be reminded to always read the labels to check the sugar and alcohol content of medications. It is important for pharmacists to remind patients that the use of certain medications may af Continue reading >>

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

Cough Medicine As Diabetes Treatment? Dextromethorphan Found To Increase Insulin Release

An ingredient found in cough medicine may assist in treating diabetes, according to a new study out of the Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany. According to the study, published in the journal Nature Medicine, dextromethorphan, often listed simply as “DM” on the labels of cold medications, boosted the release of insulin in mice, human pancreatic tissue samples, and then in a small group of diabetes patients. DM has far fewer side effects than most current type 2 diabetes drugs, which is what prompted the doctors to believe it may be a new potential treatment option. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by very high levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which the cells require to live. But people with type 2 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin (which comes from the pancreas and moves glucose out of the blood and into the cells where it’s needed). As a result, blood sugar remains high, unable to move to the cells. The authors of the study interestingly did not plan on studying dextromethorphan as a potential treatment for diabetes initially; instead, they fell into it by chance. Inspired by previous research, the authors were originally focusing on a disorder called hyperinsulism, which is essentially the opposite of diabetes in that it involves a person having too much insulin. They hypothesized that dextromethorphan would actually lower and suppress insulin release in patients with hyperinsulinism. But while studying it, they discovered that a certain compound that’s released as a byproduct of DM, dextrorphan, actually increased insulin release from a patient’s pancreas — thus making it potentially useful in treating type 2 diabetes. The researchers aren’t entirely sure how it works; however, they assume it has something to do with suppressing t Continue reading >>

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