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Best Bread For Diabetics To Eat

Bread And Diabetes: Is Ezekiel Bread A Good Alternative For You?

Bread And Diabetes: Is Ezekiel Bread A Good Alternative For You?

Bread and Diabetes: Is Ezekiel Bread a Good Alternative for You? Bread has been identified to be among the ten widely eaten foods worldwide, but has, however, been known to pose some health risk to people living with diabetes. Despite the health risk associated with the consumption of bread, bread has been identified as one of the most difficult foods to give up. However, its good to know that not all bread is a no-go area for people living with diabetes as there are a few diabetes-friendly bread choices on the market today. These types of bread are low glycemic and dont raise blood sugar level. Nutrition plays a crucial role in the control and prevention of diabetes. It is very important that you maintain steady blood sugar levels as much as possible, and therefore, should avoid such foods that can cause a quick spike in your blood sugar. Foods such as white bread, white rice, corn flakes, and pasta have been identified as high glycemic index foods, and so have the tendency of raising the blood glucose levels. But what about Ezekiel bread? Ezekiel bread is a sprouted bread whose name was an inspiration from the Bible verse Ezekiel 4 vs 9. It is known to offer a special blend of different nutrients like folic acid and amino acid, and are thus, considered as a wonderful alternative for low glycemic bread consumers. The uniqueness of Ezekiel bread is due to the nutritional profile it offers to consumers, including its carbohydrate, protein, mineral and vitamin content. It is produced from a special component such as whole grains that are organically sprouted, including barley, wheat, oats, millet, lentils, and corn, also proteins that can be sprouted or note (soybeans and other legumes). These unique varieties of nutrient are known to offer an array of health benefits th Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Breads For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

Breads For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

Bread consumption can often hinder the control of blood glucose in diabetics. Many types of bread are laden with carbohydrates and sugar causing blood glucose to rise. However, for those that refuse to surrender their daily bread, there are a few low carbohydrate breads that can contribute to fiber content in the diet and will not drastically raise blood glucose levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends high fiber breads made from whole grains to keep blood glucose from spiking and to maintain optimal digestive health. As always, it is imperative to consult with a licensed dietitian familiar with diabetes before attempting to drastically alter any diet for a medical condition. Video of the Day Pumpernickel bread is a dark brown color that is low on the glycemic index. For 1 one ounce slice, pumpernickel scores a 51 with 1 g of fat and 15 g of carbohydrate. Pumpernickel traces its origins to Germany, and was traditionally made to feed the hungry. The German Food Guide describes pumpernickel as a whole grain bread made from rye flour and coarse rye meal that, in America, has the addition of molasses or sour mix for sourdough adding to its signature color, aroma and taste. Sourdough is a white bread that is low on the glycemic index. For a 1-oz. slice, sourdough scores a 52 with 1 g g of fat and 20 g of carbohydrate. Sourdough is a rather lean dough that obtains much of its robust flavor and texture from the sour mix that ferments over time adding leavening as well as flavor. While it is a white dough, the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics Center for Integrative Medicine's Glycemic Food Index ranks sourdough lower than most in scoring making it a favorable option for diabetics. Wholegrain vs. Stoneground Wheat Wholegrain wheat provides a considerable Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods cancan cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Refined starches white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because theyre richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so its still important to limit portions stick with to cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Bread Is Best For Diabetics?

What Kind Of Bread Is Best For Diabetics?

Diabetes and bread… So many questions come up about good ‘ol bread. And not surprisingly because it's a staple food that we've all grown up on. Toast for breakfast, sandwiches for lunch, a side of bread for dinner, it's a pretty common practice right? But if you're diabetic, should bread get the cut? Is it okay to eat? Are there certain types of breads that are better than others? These are all great questions so let's dig in and go over this together now. If you have any questions, just leave them at the bottom of the post and we'll chat about it. JUMP TO MENU: What Kind of Bread Is Best? | Wheat & Rye Breads | Sourdough Bread | Does Cutting Bread Help? | Making Low Carb Breads At Home | Is Bread Better Than Cereal? | Low Carb Bread Options You Can Buy | Free Bread Baking Class What Kind Of Bread Is Best For A Diabetic? We've recently covered the types of flours that are best for diabetes, so before we dig in and talk about breads, let's briefly look at the flour cheat sheet. See how everything above coconut flour goes up from 30 g net carbs and above, which is really getting up there. In reality, the best breads for you to eat are ones made from flaxseed, almond, chickpea or coconut flour, which are a bit more difficult to come by. Of course, the simplest way to overcome this is to make your own. But, I understand that not everyone wants to make their own, and thankfully, there are quite a number of companies that supply great low carb bread options you can buy. Whole Wheat & Rye Bread and Diabetes It's often recommended that you eat whole grains instead of the white stuff and it's true, whole grains are a better choice because they are complex carbs, rather than simple carbs. But, when you take the whole grain and grind it into a flour, it changes the way your bo Continue reading >>

What Kinds Of Bread Can A Diabetic Eat?

What Kinds Of Bread Can A Diabetic Eat?

Diabetics should avoid white bread and anything else made with white flour because it can raise their blood sugar levels quickly. White flour and glucose, or pure sugar, are used to rank foods according to how fast they raise blood glucose. When a diabetic eats white bread, it is just like eating sugar. Whole Grains Are Best Finding the glycemic index of foods containing carbohydrates is a good way to control your diet and blood sugar level. Bread that is 100 percent stone-ground whole-wheat or pumpernickel is best because of its low glycemic level. Diabetics should be very careful to choose only bread that is 100 percent whole-wheat. If the label says, "Wheat Bread," the bread could contain a high content of white flour. It is best to avoid oat bread and other breads as well because they often contain white flour, which should always be treated like pure sugar when you have diabetes. Although some other breads and foods that are a lot like bread may look darker, this does not mean that they are whole-wheat products. Some bagels look like they are stone-ground whole-wheat, but they could actually be made with mostly white flour. Crackers may also look like they have wheat in them, and they might be partially made from whole wheat. This does not make them safe for diabetics to eat, however, because they will likely cause a spike in their glucose levels. Whole-wheat bread, rye, and pita breads that are not made from 100 percent stone-ground whole-wheat or pumpernickel are considered by the American Diabetes Association to be medium GI foods. Other Foods to Avoid There are many other bread products full of carbohydrates that cause spikes in blood sugar. They have a high glycemic index and include mashed potatoes, corn flakes, instant oatmeal, puffed rice, bran flakes, and Continue reading >>

Sourdough Bread Health Benefits Make It The Best Bread Choice

Sourdough Bread Health Benefits Make It The Best Bread Choice

Sourdough Bread Health Benefits Make It the Best Bread Choice Research shows that sourdough bread health benefits make this delicious food a valuable part of a healthy diet. Sourdough bread is a great healthy bread option. Have you ever been warned that you should cut bread out of your diet because its full of carbohydrates, makes you gain weight, and is bad for your health? If youre a bread lover, sourdough bread may be a great option. Sourdough bread health benefits make it an excellent and healthy bread choice. Sourdough bread has a low glycemic index and can help keep your blood sugar and insulin levels lower, helping to prevent insulin resistance and diabetes. Do you want to eat foods that help you feel better, stay slim, and avoid diet-related diseases? Do you want to be healthier by eating delicious super foods? If so, claim your FREE copy, right now, of the definitive nutrition guide on living a longer, healthier, happier life. All bread is different. What grains are used, how the grains are processed, and the way the dough is prepared and baked can all affect the composition of bread products, and in turn, how they are metabolized in our bodies. This can affect how fast the bread moves through our digestive system once we eat it, and the way our body breaks down and absorbs the starches.[1] With sourdough, the grain, oftentimes wheat, is fermented with lactic acid bacteria and wild yeasts. In this process, the grain is metabolized by the bacteria and lactic acid is produced. Sourdough has reduced simple sugar content and high levels of lactic acid, which makes it unique from other types of bread.[4] Study Summary: Sourdough Bread Has a Lower Glycemic Response If you have celiac disease or are gluten-insensitive, you know that bread can be a challenge. Click he Continue reading >>

The Best Bread For People With Diabetes

The Best Bread For People With Diabetes

Whether you're newto diabetes or have had it for a long time, you may have heard that bread is "off limits." For some people, this makes managing diets easierditching bread eliminates the need to worry about or decidewhat kind to eat. Understandably, though, you don't want to feel restricted and would rather learn what types of breads are best and what you should look for when shopping for a store-bought brand. The good news is that if you have diabetes, you can eat breadand there are plenty of healthy choices! Whole grain breads, such as whole wheat, rye, sprouted breads, and organic whole grain varieties are rich in vitamins, minerals, fiber, protein. These types of breads are superior to refined, processed breads, like white bread. The tricky part is sifting through the grocery store inventory and locating a tasty and nutritious brand. Withmany options to choose from, you can certainly get lost in the bread aisle. Having an understanding of what you should look for and what you should avoid can help you make better choices. It's important to take a stance on what your focus is. For example, are you looking for a bread that is strictly low calorie and low in carbohydrates? If that's the case, you may find some really good options, however, these choices may contain artificial ingredients, flavorings, and other additives. Or are you looking for a bread that is organic, free of GMOs and has a good amount of fiber and protein? These options are available too, however, you may have to spend more money on breads like this. Whatever type of bread you are looking for, sticking to some guidelines can help you make an informed decision. We've also included some good choices, many of which have been recommended by people with diabetes as well as other certified diabetes educat Continue reading >>

What’s The Best Bread For Diabetics? Health Expert Weighs In.

What’s The Best Bread For Diabetics? Health Expert Weighs In.

Bread is a staple in the diet of many around the world, Western and Asian alike. With such a huge variety on the shelves, how do you know which is the best bread for diabetics? Don’t break down and rye in confusion; you’ll loaf these suggestions! When shopping, here are the important things to look out for to get the best bread for diabetics: 1. Go whole The key word to look out for is “whole”. You know the bread is wholemeal if the first ingredient is “100% wholemeal flour”, “100% whole grain” or “100% whole wheat flour”. These essentially mean the same thing (all types of whole grains). 2. Choose the higher fibre content Wholemeal bread is higher in fibre because fibre is removed during the refining process of the wheat grain in white bread. There is about 1.5 g of fibre in two regular slices of white bread, about 3g in 2 slices of high-fibre white bread and 4 g of fibre in 2 slices of wholemeal bread. Look at the 100g column of the Nutrition Information Panel to check which bread has the most fibre for the same 100g (a percentage). We all know why we want more fibre in our diet! And whole grain bread is a great source of it. It helps us control our blood sugars, reduce our cholesterol, keep us feeling full and controlling our weight, and reducing our risk of colorectal cancer. It’s good stuff for sure! 3. Choose bread with no sugar/ palm oil / hydrogenated fat or shortening added These ingredients add no nutritional value, but manufacturers often add it in for taste. If it is one of the last few ingredients, it may not be a big issue as long as the bread is wholegrain. But for the best choice, try to find one without these empty calories. 4. Check for sodium Some bread can be high in sodium (salt), which is needed to activate the yeast. Two slic Continue reading >>

Bread: The Best And Worst Products For People With Diabetes

Bread: The Best And Worst Products For People With Diabetes

The truth is, managing your diet can be tedious. Nobody enjoys looking at endless panels of nutritional information. Nobody wants to check every single brand on the shelf to work out which one contains the least carbohydrate. It’s no fun. Let us do the work for you. Want to know which kind of bread is right for you? Here are 26 products, complete with nutritional information and a verdict. Note: bread is generally very high in carbohydrate. Generally, we wouldn’t recommend it to people with diabetes. But most people like a little bit of bread. So, when you do partake, this article tells you which ones are a good idea. And, more importantly, which ones aren’t. White breads 1. Hovis Soft White Medium Bread, 800g. Each slice (40g) contains: 93 calories (5% of your calorie intake for the day) 0.7g of fat (1% of your fat intake for the day) 17.9g of carbohydrate (7% of your carbohydrate intake for the day) 1.4g of sugars (2% of your sugar intake for the day) 1g of fibre 3.5g of protein (7% of your protein intake for the day) 0.36g of salt (6% of your salt intake for the day) 2. Warburtons Toastie Sliced White Bread, 800g. Each slice contains: 113 calories (6%) 0.9g of a fat (1%) 20.8g of carbohydrate (8%) 1g of sugar (1%) 1.2g of fibre 4.7g of protein (9%) 0.47g of salt (8%) 3. Hovis Soft White Thick Bread, 800g. Each slice contains: 117 calories (6%) 0.8g of fat (1%) 22.3g of carbohydrate (9%) 1.7g of a sugar (2%) 1.2g of fibre 4.4g of protein (9%) 0.45g of salt (8%) 4. Warburtons Medium Sliced White Bread, 800g. Each slice contains: 96 calories (5%) 0.8g of fat (1%) 17.7g of carbohydrates (7%) 0.9g of sugar (1%) 1g of fibre 4g of protein (8%) 0.4g of salt (7%) 5. Warburtons Farmhouse White Bread, 800g. Each slice contains: 103 calories (5%) 1.1g of fat (2%) 18.5g of Continue reading >>

Sourdough Bread Better For Blood Sugar Control

Sourdough Bread Better For Blood Sugar Control

Sourdough bread better for blood sugar control Despite the advice to avoid white bread and opt for whole grain types, new research indicates that your best bet - for breakfast anyway - is white sourdough. The type of toast you eat for breakfast can affect how your body responds to lunch. Sourdough trumped even whole wheat bread in minimizing spikes in blood sugar among participants who ate sourdough in the morning, suggesting that sourdough can be beneficial for weight loss and managing diabetes. Read on to learn why sourdough is a top pick for part of your morning meal. If you are making healthy diet choices, you are likely reaching for the whole wheat loaf when shopping for bread. However, that white sourdough round that you avoid could actually be a better choice. Researchers from the University of Guelph, in Ontario, Canada, tested the affect of white sourdough, regular white bread, whole wheat bread and whole wheat bread with barley on a group of overweight people aged 50 to 60 years old. "When the subjects ate the sourdough bread, they saw the least blood sugar and blood insulin response, which is a good thing," says Terry Graham, professor in the Guelph human health and nutritional services department. Graham adds, "There's an urban myth that if you want to lose weight, you shouldn't eat bread. But the truth is, bread is one of our biggest sources of grains and has a number of healthy benefits." Graham and a team of researchers examined how participants responded just hours after eating the bread for breakfast and again just hours after eating a standard lunch. "With the sourdough, the subjects' blood sugar levels were lower for a similar rise in blood insulin," says Graham, whose findings are to be published in the British Journal of Nutrition. He continues, "W Continue reading >>

Baffled By Bread?

Baffled By Bread?

We all love a slice of bread, but with so many types and brands out there, and a whole lot of nutritional myths to go with them, it can all be a bit confusing. There's wholemeal, white, sourdough, grain - just to name a few. But what does it all mean, and which one is actually better for you? When it comes to eating bread ask yourself three things: What benefit will this have on my health? Will this keep me full until my next meal? And how much should I be eating? If you have diabetes you also need to ask yourself: How will this affect my blood glucose levels? But this still doesn't tell you which type of bread is best for you. Well Diabetes Queensland has done the hard work for you. *White bread: * We all grew up eating it and it's probably one of the most popular items at your supermarket - but when it comes to nutritional value, you can generally do a lot better than your average slice of white bread. It doesn't have the same amount of fibre or provide you with the same sustained energy of other low GI breads but brands with added fibre and low GI varieties are also available. * Wholemeal bread: * This is where things start to get tricky because not all brown breads are created equally. Bran and wheat-germ is removed during the baking process of most packaged wholemeal breads. While this removes some of its nutritional value, it will still contain more fibre than white bread. To get the most nutrition out of your wholemeal bread try and find a loaf that actually contains wholemeal flour. * Multi-grain bread:* In theory multigrain bread sounds better for your health, but did you know 'multigrain' is simply white bread with multiple types of grain in the loaf? But the number of grains in a loaf of bread isn't that important if the grains in the bread are refined and ha Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Can Diabetics Eat Whole Wheat Bread? August 23, 2011 Return To Blog

Diabetes is a metabolic disease, meaning there is a glitch in the way the body converts food energy into usable energy. A healthy reaction to eating carbohydrate is a rise in blood sugar (glucose) followed by insulin being released as a response. The insulin acts as a key to open up cells within the brain and organs to let glucose in to be used as an immediate source of energy. Any unused energy is then stored in the liver, muscle, and fat tissues. Someone with diabetes has a rise in blood glucose but insulin is either not released or cells are resistant to the insulin. This is why diabetics have difficulty returning their high blood sugar levels back down to normal and thus need to control how much carbohydrate (glucose source) they put into their body throughout the day. Control carbohydrates. With a little effort and control diabetes can easily be managed. Diabetics should not condemn, but rather control carbohydrates. They should focus on allowing their body only the amount of carbohydrates it can handle at one time (this can be determined by a doctor or registered dietitian). Despite being diabetic, the body still needs and uses carbohydrates as its preferred source of energy. In fact, it is the only source of fuel for the brain! So it should never be eliminated, just merely controlled so your body can handle the glucose load. Stick to an eating plan. There is no single ideal eating plan for those with diabetes; the recommended plan is specific to a person’s weight, medication, blood sugars, cholesterol, and other medical conditions or concerns. Despite the varying eating plans, all diabetics should be consistent with their eating habits. Also, they need to eat about every 4-5 hours to prevent blood sugars from getting too low. Additionally, breakfast is an impor Continue reading >>

What Is A Low Gi Bread?

What Is A Low Gi Bread?

Written by Melodie Anne ; Updated November 28, 2017 Whole-grain bread has a lower GI than refined white bread. The glycemic index, or GI, rates foods on a scale of 1 to 100 based on how they affect your blood sugar. Low-glycemic index foods have a glycemic index value less than 55. These foods take a while to break down in your gut, resulting in a steady increase in blood sugar. Foods with a glycemic index over 70 are high on the scale and cause your blood sugar to surge and then suddenly drop. If you are managing diabetes or following certain weight-loss diets, selecting low-glycemic index breads may help keep your blood sugar under control. Some types of whole-grain breads are low on the glycemic index scale. Coarse barley bread, which is very dense, has a glycemic index rating of about 34. Pumpernickel bread, a less dense bread more suitable for sandwiches, has a glycemic rating of 50. Bread made with 50 percent cracked wheat kernel has a glycemic index of around 58, and 100 percent whole-grain bread has a glycemic index of 51, according to the Harvard Medical School. Any of these bread options are low on the glycemic index scale. Pitas are an alternative to traditional sliced bread and generally fall in the middle of the glycemic index. White pita bread has a glycemic index of 57. Whole-grain pitas may have a slightly lower glycemic index rating since they contain natural compounds called phytates. These compounds slow the rate of digestion, resulting in a reduced surge in blood sugar, says the Better Health Channel. Add pitas to your diet by slicing the pita in half to create two pockets for your sandwich. Or you can leave it whole and make an individual pizza, topped with tomato sauce, veggies and low-fat cheese. Tortillas are made with most of the same ingredien Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. White Bread Refined starches — white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour — act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because they’re richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so it’s still important to limit portions — stick with ½ to ¾ cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

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