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Best Apples For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Fruits To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Good news for fruit lovers everywhere: eating fresh fruit is associated with a lower risk of diabetes and a lower risk of complications if you already have the disease, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine. Featured recipe: Fresh Fruit Salad If you've been steering clear of fruit because of the sugar content, there's no reason to do so, according to this study. Over a seven-year time period, researchers analyzed the diet and health outcomes of more than 500,000 Chinese adults. The researchers found that higher fruit consumption was not associated with higher blood sugar, even for people with diabetes. Adults who consumed fruit more frequently actually had a lower risk of developing diabetes. The study only analyzed fresh fruit consumption, not dried fruit or fruit juice, so we turned to a few registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators to clarify the best and worst fruits, appropriate serving sizes, and how many carbohydrates you should get from fruit each day. First it's important to note that "diabetes care is individualized," says Staci Freeworth, RD, CDE, and professor of nutrition at Bowling Green State University. This is why it is important for people with diabetes to see a certified diabetes educator (CDE). These specialists can break down how many carbohydrates you should be eating each day based on your individual needs and health history. Best Fruits to Eat Recipe to Try: Purple Fruit Salad Whether you have diabetes or not, the consensus from dietitians is the same regarding which fruits are best to eat. "The best fruits for everyone to eat are the ones that create the least influence on blood sugar, often termed 'low glycemic load,'—even if you don't have diabetes," says Daphne Olivier, RD, CDE, founder of My Food Coach. "These in Continue reading >>

Apples Are Good For People With Diabetes

Apples Are Good For People With Diabetes

By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Apples are undeniably good for youespecially if you have diabetes. Fall's favorite fruit has lots of good-for-you nutrients. Plus, research has linked apples with certain health benefits related to diabetes. A small apple (about the size of a tennis ball) delivers roughly: 60calories, 16 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber. It's also a good source of vitamin C. Additionally, apples contain quercetin, a type of phytochemicalknown as a flavonoid, which is found in the apples skin. Animal researchand research usingcell cultures havefound the quercetin may help to protect against certain cancers and help to kill cancer cells.In a 2015 study inPharmacognosymagazine, researchers found that quercetin improved glucose metabolism in liver and skeletal cells when studied in test tubes. Apples also containsoluble fiberthe kind that helps keep you full, slows down the absorption of nutrients (such as sugar) into your bloodstream, and helps to lower your cholesterol.In addition to helping to regulate blood sugar and bowel function, soluble fiber is thought to have an anti-inflammatory effect that may help people with diabetes recover faster from infections. The recommended daily intake for fiber is 25 (for women) to 38 (for men) grams a day. Learn which foods to enjoy and avoidand start feeling great! A skinned apple is still good for you, but with skin an apple provides 3grams of fiberabout 12 percent of the recommended total dailyintake. There's no denying fruits and vegetables are a healthy and important part of the diet for everyone, including those with diabetes . Registered Dietitian (RD) and Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), Audrey Koltun, says: "Many people with diabetes are afraid to eat fruit because they think Continue reading >>

Are Apples Good For Keeping Blood Sugar Steady?

Are Apples Good For Keeping Blood Sugar Steady?

Foods with carbohydrates affect your body's blood sugar levels differently, depending on their individual ingredients and nutrient profile. Foods rich in sugars and refined grains are more likely to raise your blood sugar levels, while foods rich in fiber are less likely to affect blood sugar levels, thus helping you keep your levels steady. Apples are rich in fiber and won't have a large effect on your blood sugar. Total carbohydrates in apples comprise starches, sugars and fiber. Sugars are the most abundant type of carbohydrate in apples, while starches are present in small amounts. One medium gala apple with skin contains 24 grams of total carbohydrates. Nearly 18 grams of that total are from sugar, and 4 grams are dietary fiber. The rest is starch. Green apples contain slightly fewer carbs, evident by their tarter taste. One medium Granny Smith apple contains a little less than 23 grams of total carbs. Of that total, 5 grams are fiber, 16 grams are sugar, and the rest is starch. Glycemic Index of Apples You can use the glycemic index to estimate how much of an impact a carbohydrate food will have on your blood sugar. The glycemic index is a scale from one to 100 that measures a food's effect on blood sugar compared to straight glucose, which has a rating of 100. A rating of 55 or less is low, meaning that food isn't likely to raise blood sugar levels significantly. Apples have an average rating of 39, which means they're a low-glycemic food. Comparison to Other Fruits Apples are one of the lowest-glycemic fruits you can choose, which means they're good news for your blood sugar levels. Ripe bananas are considerably higher on the glycemic index, with a rating of 62. Grapes are also higher, with an average rating of 59. Watermelon has one of the highest scores of all Continue reading >>

What's The Best Apple For Diabetics?

What's The Best Apple For Diabetics?

Apples are a great snack choice for diabetics as they only have 80 to 90 calories and are low on the glycemic index. Plus, they’re a good source of fiber and vitamin C. The skin, or apple peel, is the most nutritious part of the fruit, as it is where most of the antioxidants are found. All of these things are a positive factor when it comes to managing diabetes. And according to the Harvard Gazette, apples are particularly beneficial for reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. If you had to pick just one apple, tart green apples, such as Granny Smith, are lower in sugar and therefore the best choice for people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

Are Green Apples Better Than Red Apples For Diabetics?

Are Green Apples Better Than Red Apples For Diabetics?

I will be honest with you. I love red apples because they are oh-so-juicy and sweet, and I eat one daily. But if you are a diabetic you might just want to go for the green ones instead of red. While you may think how colour can make a difference, the truth is green apples are packed with a little more nutrients than their red counterparts Well-known diabetologist Dr. Swapnil Ganeshpure, Arihant Clinic, Vashi, tells you why you should opt green apple over red ones. Green apples typically contain less sugar and more fibre and thus outweigh the blood sugar spikes that you may worry. They are particularly beneficial for reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. They also have high antioxidant levels and are an excellent source of vitamin C. They contain about 20g of carbohydrates to provide you with all the energy, and most of it comes from natural sugars. Also, green apples have a GI rating of 39 which means that they are a low glycemic food. Karela or bitter gourd is also excellent to manage diabetes. Tips So just toss one green apple in your lunch bag and do not peel the skin as the skin is the most nutritious part—full of antioxidants. However, portion sizes remain important in the case of diabetics. Eating too many apples at one can cause your blood sugar levels to spike so just go for one medium sized apple instead of a large one. Also, avoid dipping your apple in peanut butter, chocolate or caramel sauce. You can also use low sugar fruits such as green apple and berries to prepare a smoothie. Try preparing this mint and coriander smoothie. Image source: Getty Images? Disclaimer: TheHealthSite.com does not guarantee any specific results as a result of the procedures mentioned here and the results may vary from person to person. The topics in these pages including text, Continue reading >>

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

Fruits are the perfect snack. They are loaded with nutrients and fiber, relatively low in calories, and easy to bring to work. However, they do contain naturally occurring sugars, sometimes in large amounts. This can be a concern for those who struggle to manage their blood sugars. This article takes a science-based look at the most suitable fruits for diabetics. 1. Blueberries Blueberries are quite low in sugar, with 10 grams per 100 grams of fruit (1). But that sugar is also accompanied by 2 grams of fiber. This is important because when sugar and fiber are eaten together, blood sugar levels don’t spike as quickly (2, 3). It’s the reason 10 grams of sugar from fresh fruits will not have the same effect on blood sugar levels as 10 grams of sugar from a candy bar. In addition, blueberries provide loads of other beneficial nutrients and antioxidants that protect our cells from damage. Interestingly, a study on over 187,000 people tracked over two decades found those who ate the most blueberries had more than a 25% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who ate the fewest (4). Blueberries are great for a snack, and you can even enjoy them in salads. Although they can be particularly expensive, know that frozen blueberries are still nutritious and often much more affordable. 2. Strawberries Strawberries contain even less sugar than blueberries, with only 5 grams per 100 grams of fruit (5). This makes them a great choice for diabetics. They also provide fiber, manganese, folate, and a lot of vitamin C. In fact, 100 grams of strawberries (5-6 large strawberries) provides 98% of our daily vitamin C requirements. Strawberries are a great addition to breakfast foods like oats or yogurt, but they are also delicious on their own. 3. Blackberries Blackberries stand out as n Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Apples And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And Other Fruits

Apples And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And Other Fruits

Apples are a nutritious snack, but are the sugars and carbohydrates in an apple good or bad for blood sugar and insulin levels if a person has diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association , although they contain sugars and carbohydrates , eating apples and other fruit is not a problem for a person with either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes . Apples contain a different kind of sugar to foods with added sugar, and they also contain fiber and nutrients. A person with diabetes should be aware of how apples affect them in order to include this fruit in a diabetes-healthy diet. In this article, we look at the effects of apples and other fruit on diabetes symptoms. Are apples good for people with diabetes? The fiber in apples may help to slow the absorption of sugars in the body. People with diabetes must watch their carbohydrate intake to make sure their blood sugar levels stay stable throughout the day. It makes sense, then, to monitor any foods that contain carbs and sugars. According to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) , there are about 25 grams (g) of carbs in total in a medium-sized apple, and around 19 g of that is sugar. Most of the sugar in an apple is in the form of naturally occurring fructose, however, and this may have a different effect on the body than other sugars. Also, fructose is different to the refined and processed sugars found in packaged foods such as chocolates and biscuits. A recent review posted to the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that replacing glucose or sucrose with fructose led to less sugar and insulin in the blood stream after a meal. The USDA report that a medium apple contains around 4 g of dietary fiber, and this fiber may help slow the absorption of sugars in the body, which could help prevent spikes Continue reading >>

Are Apples Good For Type 2 Diabetics?

Are Apples Good For Type 2 Diabetics?

From juice to cider to all-American apple pie, apples can be found in many delicious (and popular) dishes. Over the years you've probably even heard the saying: “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” While apples are generally a healthy food, when you're a type 2 diabetic, the picture is slightly different. Since we encourage a low carb diet (because science shows it works), we don't recommend apples. Quite simply because, apples are a high carb food. But I'm sure you're eager to dig a bit deeper into the reasoning and discover more of the facts, so let's dive in… Apples Nutrition Facts The calorie and carbohydrate count can vary considerably based on the size and type of apple. But no matter what the size of the fruit is, apples are a very high carbohydrate food that contain a lot of sugar (20-35 grams), and more specifically lots of fructose (around 9.5 grams). Of course, apples are a type of fruit, so naturally they do have some very beneficial properties such as high fiber content (3-5 grams), along with various vitamins and minerals. For instance, a medium gala apple contains: 6% Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) potassium 8% RDA vitamin C 4% RDA vitamin A 5% RDA riboflavin 6% RDA vitamin B6 While apples may provide some nutritional value to the general public. For you as a diabetic, making the switch to something else is better. And hey, vegetables offer far more vitamins and minerals than an apple. For example, if you were to switch out that apple for a cup of kale, you’d get 200% of your RDA of vitamin C and 434% of your daily vitamin A – and all that for just 13 calories and 1 gram of carbohydrates. Try these delicious Crispy Kale Chips – they will more than satisfy your snack attack! Sounds like a much better option to maintain blood glucose and A Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Apples?

Can Diabetics Eat Apples?

Apples and other fruits are widely recognized as part of a nutritious diet. But if you have diabetes, you may be concerned about fruit's impact on your blood glucose levels. Like all fruits, apples are rich in sugar, a form of carbohydrates which the body converts into glucose. Eating too much carbohydrates at once, or too much overall can lead to elevated blood glucose levels. The good news is that the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the inclusion of fruit, including fiber-rich apples, in a diabetes meal plan as long as these foods are fit into your carbohydrate targets. Video of the Day When digested, the carbohydrates from apples are broken down into glucose, a simple form of sugar. As this glucose enters the blood, insulin is needed to help convert this sugar into energy. However, people with diabetes either don’t make enough insulin, or their insulin doesn’t work well, and as a result, dietary carbohydrates have the potential to lead to high blood glucose levels. To best manage blood glucose levels, it’s helpful to eat moderate portions of carbohydrate-containing foods and to spread these foods throughout the day. Alternatively, if you take fast-acting insulin at meals, you can eat according to your appetite and preferences, since you can learn to match your insulin dose to your carbohydrate intake. Meal Planning with Apples A small, tennis ball-sized apple or one-half large apple contains approximately 15 grams of total carbohydrates -- about the same as 1 slice of bread. If you know your carbohydrate targets, you can decide which carbohydrate foods to eat at your meals and snacks. For example, if your lunch carbohydrate target is 45 grams, you can choose to eat one-half apple at 15 grams along with a whole sandwich at 30 grams, or you can cho Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

The Health Benefits Of Apples

The Health Benefits Of Apples

We’re right in the middle of October. Here in New England, the leaves are changing, the weather is crisper, and it’s prime time for apples! In fact, October just happens to be National Apple Month, and rightly so. With so many luscious varieties available, it would be a shame not to indulge and reap the health benefits of apples. Apple fun facts Curious about apples? Here are a few fun facts to digest: • About 2,500 varieties of apples are grown in the U.S., and 100 varieties are grown commercially. • Apples are grown in all 50 states. • Apples were the favorite fruit of the ancient Greeks and Romans. • The size of apples ranges from roughly the size of a cherry to the size of a grapefruit. • The top 10 apple varieties sold in the United States are Gala, Red Delicious, Fuji, Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Golden Delicious, McIntosh, Cripp’s Pink Lady, Braeburn, and Jazz. • One of the oldest varieties of apples in existence is the Lady apple. • A food-grade wax is applied to many varieties of apples after harvesting. • Apples ripen 6–10 times faster at room temperature than in the refrigerator. I could go on about apples! Who knew that there was so much to know about them? Apple nutrition Despite all of the apple lore, you might be wondering if apples fit into a diabetes eating plan. The answer, plain and simple, is absolutely yes! First, here’s a breakdown of the nutritional value of an “average” apple (the nutrition numbers will vary somewhat from apple to apple, and, of course, based on the size of the apple). One small, 6-ounce apple contains the following: • 80 calories • 21 grams of carbohydrate • 4 grams of fiber • 0 grams of protein • 0 grams of fat • 2 milligrams of sodium • 164 milligrams of potassium In addition, apples c Continue reading >>

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