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Best Alcohol For Diabetics

4 Tips On Drinking When You Have Diabetes

4 Tips On Drinking When You Have Diabetes

If your doctor's given you permission to drink, follow these guidelines to do it responsibly Drink with care Is there room for alcohol in your diet if you have diabetes? Perhaps, if you are particularly vigilant about its use. The first problem with alcohol is that it lowers blood sugar levels due to its effect on the liver. The second is that it is high in calories-almost as high as fat-but with few nutrients. If you get the green light from your health-care team that it is okay to drink on occasion, here are some useful tips. Pair alcohol with food Food acts like a sponge, helping to absorb some of the alcohol and in turn minimizing its effect on blood sugar. Likewise, sip your drink slowly to further slow absorption. A person with diabetes should always eat carbohydrate foods when drinking alcohol, and never drink on an empty stomach. Don’t drink when your blood sugar is low By taking consistent daily blood sugar readings, you will be in a much better position to make an intelligent decision about whether to drink. If your blood sugar is already low, there is no need to cause more problems by drinking. Moderation is best There are fewer risks to your diabetes, and possible benefits, by keeping to current guidelines: No more than one drink per day for women, two per day for men. But be sure your diabetes is well controlled. If weight loss is a goal, drinking may hinder progress, so discuss this with your health-care team. Keep the mixers calorie-free If you choose hard liquor, watch out for added calories due to the mixers. Stick with club soda, mineral water, diet soft drinks, Bloody Mary mix, or coffee for hot drinks. Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Alcohol. Yep, some people with diabetes drink it. I do, on occasion. Some argue that drinking alcohol with diabetes isn’t the healthiest choice, but I could say the same thing about diet soda. Whatever your stance on it is, it is something that should be handled with care, especially when you are dealing with diabetes. As anyone with diabetes (or someone who loves a PWD) knows, it is a balancing act. Between food, exercise, hormones and the like, we are constantly chasing that elusive 100 mg/dl on the meter. Alcohol can really throw your blood sugars into a tailspin. Let’s not even start on carbohydrates in your drink. Your liver and its functions are a very big player in how you manage diabetes while drinking. Instead of helping to regulate your blood sugar, your liver is busy metabolizing the alcohol, which can result in some scary lows. Be prepared with glucose tabs and make sure to check regularly if you are having a drink. What to Drink? I like to stick to drinks that don’t have carbohydrates in them: a good red wine, vodka and club soda or Fresca, or an occasional martini are predictable for me. Plus, I don’t have to take any insulin with them which makes it easier. If I am having a beer or something fruity like rum punch, I make sure to limit how much I am having. I once had an endocrinologist tell me that after every 3 drinks make your fourth one with carbs. I don’t know how good that advice was, I don’t follow it… But I do stick to what I know, I test very often, and I make sure to eat something while I am drinking. Bedtime Cautions Yes, you should be cautious before bed even when not drinking but you need to be even more on track of what your blood sugar is when you are. I cannot stress enough to test right before bed (and before you brush your t Continue reading >>

The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

The Most Important Things To Know About Diabetes And Alcohol

back to Overview Tips & Tricks We recently held our annual mySugr holiday celebration. What a good opportunity to talk about drinking alcohol with diabetes and the effect on blood sugar, right? Reviewed for accuracy and updated December 18, 2017 — SKJ Party time! You can probably imagine it. Some snacks to nibble on, a live DJ spinning the (digital) wheels of steel, and some tasty adult beverages. In a situation like that, It’s all too easy to get caught up in the atmosphere and not think about your blood sugar. That’s totally natural – who wants to think about diabetes when you’re having a good time? I certainly don’t. But does drinking alcohol affect your diabetes and blood sugar? Is it something to be concerned about? Pay Respect! Here’s the deal. If you don’t pay some attention to alcohol and learn how it interacts with your diabetes, it will stop your party in one way or another, either during the dance-off or perhaps more commonly, hours later when you’re sound asleep and dreaming about your fancy moves. Cruelly, that’s when you’re least expecting it and when you’re at your most vulnerable. Having diabetes is no reason to avoid drinking if it’s something you’d like to do. But you should understand how it works so you can do so safely. I’m not personally a big drinker, but I’ve done some digging and hope to share a few bits of useful information to help keep you safe. We’re all different, but basics are basic… One of the most important things I can share is that we’re all different, especially when it comes to our diabetes. Many people also differ in how they respond to alcohol. So like everything – your mileage may vary. In any case, there’s no harm in talking about some of the basic ways alcohol affects metabolism, and wh Continue reading >>

Fitting Alcohol Into Your Meal Plan

Fitting Alcohol Into Your Meal Plan

The use of alcohol should be discussed with your physician and healthcare team. As a general guideline, for persons using insulin, two alcoholic beverages may be used in addition to their regular meal plan. No food should be omitted in exchange for an alcoholic drink. For persons who are not on insulin and are watching their weight, alcohol is best substituted for fat choices and in some cases extra bread/starch choices. Some alcoholic beverages contain higher amounts of sugar and carbohydrate — these include sweet wines, sweet vermouth and wine coolers. Use these sparingly as they may increase your blood glucose levels too much. Additional guidelines for the use of alcohol are printed below. Beverage Amount Calories Carbo- Equal to: hydrate (gms) ------------------------------------------------------------- Beer Regular beer 12 ounces 150 14 1 starch & 1-1/2 fats Light beer 12 ounces 100 6 2 fats Nonalcoholic beer 11 ounces 50 10 1 starch Distilled spirits 1.5 ounces 105 trace 2 fats 86 proof (gin, rum vodka, whiskey, scotch, bourbon) Wine red table or rose 4 ounces 85 1.0 2 fats dry white 4 ounces 80 .4 2 fats sweet wine 2 ounces 90 6.5 1/2 starch & 1-1/2 fats light wine 4 ounces 55 1.3 1 fat wine coolers 12 ounces 190 22.0 1-1/2 fruit & 3 fat champagne 4 ounces 100 3.6 2 fats sherry 2 ounces 75 1.5 1-1/2 fats sweet sherry/port 2 ounces 95 7.0 1/2 starch & 1-1/2 fats Vermouths dry 3 ounces 105 4.2 2 fats sweet 3 ounces 140 13.9 1 starch & 2 fats General Guidelines for the Use of Alcohol Alcoholic beverages are a common part of our social lives. Each adult must decide whether or not to use alcohol. When making this decision, you should understand what the potential effects of alcohol are on your health. Although alcohol has little effect on blood glucose control, it Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

For some people, having a few drinks at home or in the pub is part of everyday life. And having diabetes shouldn’t get in the way of this. But when you have diabetes, it’s a bit more complicated. You might want to know whether it's safe to drink alcohol, and how much is okay. So yes, you can still drink, but you need to be aware of how it can affect your body and how to manage this. For example, drinking can make you more likely to have a hypo, because alcohol makes your blood sugars drop. It can affect your weight too, as there can be a lot of calories in alcoholic drinks. We’ll give you all the facts here. Alcohol and risk factors for Type 2 We don’t know exactly what causes Type 2 diabetes. But we do know that your family history, age and ethnic background affects your risk of developing it, and we know you’re more likely to develop it if you’re overweight. These are all called risk factors. Alcohol isn’t a risk factor in itself. But it can contain a lot of calories, which can lead to putting on weight. Take a look at our information about risk factors and find out your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Government guidelines on alcohol units To help keep health risks from alcohol at a low level, it’s safest not to regularly drink more than 14 units a week. These guidelines are the same for men and women. But what does this actually mean when you’re in the pub or having dinner with a glass of wine at home? It means you shouldn’t drink more than six medium glasses of wine or six pints of lager a week. But the size of the glass and type of alcohol affects the number of units, so it’s best to check the guidelines at drinkaware.co.uk Alcohol and hypos If you use insulin or some other diabetes medications like sulphonylureas, you’re more likely to Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

Whether it’s a fruit-filled drink or a boozy beverage you’re looking for, this collection of 6 Holiday Cocktail Recipes is sure to wow your party guests with flavor & presentation. Each made with bubbly ingredients like 7UP®, Canada Dry® Ginger Ale, & Squirt®, consider these creations your go-to guide for tasty entertaining all Christmas long. And pick up all the ingredients you need at Safeway or Albertsons Companies. Must be 21 or older to consume alcohol. Please drink responsibly. Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Alcohol And Diabetes: How Does It Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

For many people, a glass of alcohol here and there does not pose a problem. However, for those with health conditions, such as diabetes, alcohol can affect blood sugar levels and pose a health risk. Understanding what you are consuming and how alcohol influences blood glucose levels is particularly important for people with diabetes. Alcohol can interfere with blood sugar levels. People with diabetes should sip drinks slowly and not drink on an empty stomach. Alcohol and the body Alcohol is a depressant; it is classed as a "sedative-hypnotic drug" because it depresses the central nervous system. Every organ in the body can be affected by alcohol. Once consumed, it is rapidly absorbed by the stomach and small intestine and enters the bloodstream. In an average person, the liver can breaks down roughly one standard drink of alcohol per hour. Excess alcohol moves throughout the body. The amount not broken down by the liver is removed by the lungs,kidneys, and skin in urine and sweat. How alcohol affects a person's body depends on how much they consume. At low doses, alcohol can act as a stimulant - people may feel happy, or become talkative. Drinking too much alcohol, however, can impair the body. Alcohol and blood sugar levels A person's overall health plays a big role in how they respond to alcohol. People with diabetes or other blood sugar problems must be careful when consuming alcohol. Alcohol consumption can interfere with blood sugar as well as the hormones needed to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Frequent heavy drinkers can wipe out their energy storage in a few hours. Over time, excessive alcohol consumption can reduce the overall effectiveness of insulin. This results in high blood sugar levels. Many people with alcoholic liver disease also have either gluc Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Proceed With Caution

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Proceed With Caution

Alcohol can worsen diabetes-related nerve damage.(RON CHAPPLE STOCK/CORBIS)Hoping for a beer at the ball game, or a glass of wine with dinner? If you have type 2 diabetes, that's probably OK as long as your blood sugar is under control, you don't have any complications that are affected by alcohol (such as high blood pressure), and you know how the drink will affect your blood sugar, according to the American Diabetes Association. An alcohol-containing drink a day might even help your heart (though if you don't already drink, most experts say that's not a reason to start). In moderation, alcohol may cut heart disease risk According to a study by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, women with type 2 diabetes who drank relatively small amounts of alcohol had a lower heart-disease risk than those who abstained. A second study found that men with diabetes had the same reduction in heart risk with a moderate alcohol intake as non-diabetic men. In general, the recommendations for alcohol consumption for someone with type 2 diabetes are the same as anyone else: no more than two drinks per day for men and no more than one drink per day for women. (Make sure to measure: A drink serving is 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor such as scotch, gin, tequila, or vodka.) People with diabetes who choose to drink need to take extra care keeping food, medications, alcohol, and blood sugars in balance. Janis Roszler, RD, a certified diabetes educator in Miami, Fla., recommends: Mixing alcoholic drinks with water or calorie-free diet sodas instead of sugary (and calorie- and carbohydrate-laden) sodas and other mixers. Once you have had your drink, switch to a non-alcoholic drink, such as sparkling water, for the rest of the evening. Make sure yo Continue reading >>

How Much Alcohol And What Type Is Best With Diabetes?

How Much Alcohol And What Type Is Best With Diabetes?

How much alcohol and what type is best with diabetes? Editors Note: This content has been verified byMarina Basina, MD, a Clinical Associate Professor at Stanford University. Shes a clinical endocrinologist and researcher with a focus on diabetes management and diabetes technology. Dr. Basina is an active member of multiple medical advisory boards and community diabetes organizations, and she is on the Beyond Type 1 Science Advisory Council. So, you are going to drink alcohol. But what type is best to drink with diabetes? And how much can you drink? Before choosing what types of alcohol you want to be drinking, make sure that you understand the risks of drinking with diabetes and how to drink safely. If youre going to drink, exercise moderation. According to the CDC, women with diabetes should consume no more than one serving of alcohol a day. Men with diabetes should consume no more than two servings per day. One serving of alcohol typically looks like the following: The type of alcohol that you choose to drink can influence how your night turns out if you have diabetes. Different drinks will affect your body with diabetes wildly differently. This is because there are two competing factors. On one hand, alcohol alone inhibits the steady release of glucose from the liver, which can cause low blood sugar. Read more about why that is here . On the other hand, the sugar and carbs in many drinks can cause high blood sugar. Because of how volatile your bodys reaction to drinking can be, make sure to be constantly checking your blood glucose levels (BGLs). Be cognizant of what is in whatever you are drinking. Beer is a popular drinking choice, whether it be while social drinking or just cracking open an ice cold bottle in front of the television on game night. However, one i Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Drinks That Are Safe And (unsafe) For Diabetics

Alcoholic Drinks That Are Safe And (unsafe) For Diabetics

When youre diabetic , you have to maintain a careful balance in your diet to ensure your blood sugar levels are stable. And when it comes to alcohol, you probably assume its totally off limits. The American Diabetes Association reports alcohol can drop your blood glucose significantly. And if your livers stores of glucose are totally used up, this can lead to dangerously low levels or death in severe cases. The good news is you can actually enjoy a drink if you do so in moderation (and of course, always ask your doctor about any restrictions you should follow). Here are the least offensive drinks for diabetics, followed by the worst ones. Sommelier fills glasses of wine at a tasting | Berezko/Getty Images No matter what youre drinking, there are certain guidelines diabetics should follow. The ADA suggests women have only one drink per day, and men have two. Eating something fatty can also help keep your blood sugar levels stable while youre drinking, so consider this. Also, make sure youre staying hydrated by sipping on plenty of water, and let someone youre out with know youre diabetic. This recommendation shouldnt come as much of a surprise. These beers have a fraction of the sugar that a normal beer has, making them safer for diabetics to consume. And it turns out Bud Select 55 might be the best choice overall, Shape notes . Not only does one beer contain just 55 calories, but it also only has 1.8 grams of carbs. Compare this to a normal beer that can have up to 15 grams of carbs for one pint. If your drink of choice is wine, youll want to go with a dry red or white variety. WebMD notes theres some research to suggest these wine types may actually help your body use insulin with more efficiency. And Shape notes theres also good news for those who like Champagne, as Continue reading >>

Alcohol & Diabetes The Most Important Things To Know

Alcohol & Diabetes The Most Important Things To Know

Any gathering is a good opportunity to talk about drinking alcohol with diabetes and the effect on blood sugar, right? You can probably imagine it. Some snacks to nibble on, a live DJ spinning the (digital) wheels of steel, and some tasty adult beverages.In a situation like that, Its all too easy to get caught up in the atmosphere and not think about your blood sugar. Thats totally natural - who wants to think about diabetes when you're having a good time? I certainly dont. But does drinking alcohol affect your diabetes and blood sugar? Is it something to be concerned about? Heres the deal. If you dont pay some attention to alcohol and learn how it interacts with your diabetes, it will stop your party in one way or another, either during the dance-offor perhaps more commonly, hours later when you're sound asleep and dreaming about your fancy moves. Cruelly, thats when you're least expecting it and when you're at your most vulnerable. Having diabetes is no reason to avoid drinking if its something you'd like to do. But you should understand how it works so you can do so safely. I'm not personally a big drinker, but I've done some digging and hope to share a few bits of useful information to help keep you safe. We're all different, but basics are basic... One of the most important things I can share is that we're all different, especially when it comes to our diabetes. Many people also differ in how they respond to alcohol. So like everything your mileage may vary. In any case, theres no harm in talking about some of the basic ways alcohol affects metabolism, and what it does to blood sugar. Ready? Alcohol inhibits glucose release from the liver. So what? The presence of alcohol in your system can cause low blood sugar. Why? Because it plays games with your liver. How? Y Continue reading >>

Top 11 Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

Top 11 Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

1 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 2 3 Foods to Throw Away Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 … nucific.com Alcohol contains carbohydrates and result in an increase of blood sugars. It is important to factor in the carbohydrates you drink from alcohol when planning your insulin requirements. Drinking excessive alcohol can result in blood sugar spikes and drops if you are not prepared. If you are drinking moderately you will have better blood sugar balance than if you drink excessively. If you have diabetes you should make sure to only drink when you have food and can monitor your blood glucose levels. Never choose to omit food because you are drinking extra carbohydrates, instead make sure and eat some protein to balance out your alcohol. Include your alcohol as a carbohydrate in your meal and snack planning. When mixing your favorite alcoholic drink make sure to use calorie free soda. You could also use club soda, sparkling water, tonic water, or ginger ale. These substitutes for sugary sodas will give a delicious base to add any of your favorite alcohol flavors to. Some of these typical drinks include vodka tonic, rum and coke, scotch and soda. 1. Vodka Tonic 2. Rum and Diet Coke 3. Sugar Free Margarita 4. Light Beers 5. Wine Spritzers 6. Dry Wines 7. Vodka Cranberry 8. Scotch and Soda 9. Screwdriver 10. Mojito 11. Gin and Tonic When getting your drink from the bar, make sure to ask about substitutes for high sugar simple syrups that are often included in mixed drinks. Ask about splenda based products if the bar has them or sugar free options for your simple syrup. There are some brands that specialize in low calorie and low carbohydrate drinks which you can ask for spe Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

Alcoholic Drinks For Diabetics

If you have diabetes but want to relax with an alcoholic drink, it's important to know what cocktails are most appropriate for people with diabetes. Avoid sugary concoctions that are loaded with carbs and choose from a variety of alcoholic drinks that won't cause you to consume too much sugar. List of Alcoholic Drinks for People With Diabetes Moderation is key in drinking alcohol whether you have diabetes or not. In general, diabetes does bring with it additional challenges, and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends women should have no more than one alcoholic beverage per day, and men should consume no more than two. One drink equals 12 ounces of beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1 1/2 ounces spirits. The following cocktails limit carbohydrates naturally, so they can be part of a diabetic diet. If you're looking for a flavorful cocktail that won't cause your blood sugar to spike , a Bloody Mary is a terrific option. Make a Bloody Mary using this basic Bloody Mary recipe , making sure the tomato juice you use has no added sugar. R.W. Knudsen's 100% organic tomato juice is a good option. If you have access to an abundance of fresh tomatoes, you can squeeze them yourself. A martini made with gin or vodka , dry vermouth , and garnishes like olives, lemons, and baby onions is a good option for those on a diabetic diet. Dirty martinis also work well for people who are seeking to keep the sugar in their diet to a minimum. However, if you're out, clarify what ingredients are in your drink as many martinis served in bars are full of sugar. Club soda and soda water are both great mixers for diabetics because they don't have any calories, sugar, or carbs. Mix a shot of vodka with three to six ounces of club soda, squeeze in a bit of lime, and stir over ice. You can alter t Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes: Carb Counts & Facts On Consumption

Alcohol And Diabetes: Carb Counts & Facts On Consumption

Here you'll find all the carb counts for different alcoholic beverages and we'll cover all the intricate details about alcohol and diabetes. But no doubt the one burning question you want answered is: can you indulge in a drink? Certainly excess alcohol by way of binge drinking is not healthy for anyone but it can be especially dangerous for people with type 2 diabetes. But moderate drinking within the standard guidelines is acceptable. Though you also need to evaluate all the details below to see if you really want to indulge. JUMP TO: Side effects of alcohol | Best alcoholic beverages to drink | Research on alcohol and type 2 diabetes | Why blood sugar and alcohol aren't a good match | Key tips when drinking alcohol Alcohol and It's Side Effects Ethanol, the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, is formed through the fermentation of fruit and grain sugars. And while casually drinking alcohol may seem like the norm among the general population, diabetics should consider the potential risks before joining in on the drinking festivities. Loss of coordination, impaired judgment, and slowed reflexes are some of the typical side effects of having a little too much to drink, but the stakes are much higher for a person with type 2 diabetes. You see, alcohol is a toxin that must be metabolized and broken down by the liver. The liver is also one of the predominant organs involved in regulating your blood sugar. And unfortunately, the liver can't effectively perform these two separate tasks at the same time. Since the body sees alcohol as a toxin that needs to be removed quickly, this task takes priority over managing your blood glucose levels. So, as you throw back a shot of hard liquor or sip away on a few beers, your blood sugar could potentially drop to dangerously low blood Continue reading >>

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