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Berries And Diabetes

Juniper Berries And Diabetes - Natural Insuline

Juniper Berries And Diabetes - Natural Insuline

Juniper berries are part of the genus Juniperus, native to Northern Europe, Asia, and North America. These plants have blue or reddish fruit which are commonly known as berries. I love to say that Junipers are extensivelyused as ornamental trees. I do not want to make my narration botanical, but I admit that you can find these berries with other different names such asGenvrier,Ginepro, Enebro, Gemeiner Wachholde (which indeed sounds strange to me:). NORMAL or DANGEROUS Type Your Blood sugar Level: Role in controlling blood sugar leveland symptoms This is the part that most of you are really interested and that's why you are here. I'd like to thank you for that. Now, as you may probably know, diabetes is a serious chronic disease that affects the bloodsugar level of the body due to some troubles caused in insulin production and secretion or proper functioning. Insulin is a hormone secreted by beta cells of thepancreas.Insulin maintains the blood glucose level by increasing themetabolism of the glucose in the body and increase the absorption of glucose inthe cells from the blood stream. So, when there is some disturbance in theinsulin function, patient suffer with this disease. Diabetes can be dividedinto two types, one is known as the type 1 diabetes mellitus, in whichinsufficient amount of insulin is produced and is mostly occurred in children. Second one is known as the type 2 diabetes mellitus in which the receptors onwhich insulin acts become non responsive or insufficient, and is mostlyoccurred in adults. So these berries and their extract can be used in thisdisease, because they have certain components which increase the insulinproduction, sensitization of receptors and make the blood flow efficient. Theseall things result in the decrease of blood glucose level. G Continue reading >>

Intake Of Fruit, Berries, And Vegetables And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Finnish Men: The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study

Intake Of Fruit, Berries, And Vegetables And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Finnish Men: The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study

Background: Although higher intakes of fruit, berries, and vegetables (FBV) have been associated with reduced risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in some observational studies, the evidence is limited and inconclusive. Objective: We assessed the relation of FBV intake and T2D incidence in Finnish men. Design: We studied 2332 men from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study who were aged 4260 y and free of T2D or impaired fasting glucose at baseline in 19841989. Food intake was assessed with 4-d food recording. T2D was assessed by using self-administered questionnaires, a fasting blood glucose measurement, a 2-h oral-glucose-tolerance test, and record linkage to a reimbursement register on diabetes medication expenses. In the Cox proportional hazards model, HRs for T2D were computed for the highest compared with lowest quartiles of FBV intake adjusted for age, examination year, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, smoking, education, physical activity, family history of diabetes, and energy and alcohol intakes. Results: During the mean follow-up time of 19.3 y, 432 new cases of T2D occurred. For the total FBV intake (with the exclusion of potatoes and fruit and berry juices), the extreme-quartile multivariable-adjusted HR for T2D was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.57, 1.02; P-trend = 0.15). In the analysis for FBV components, berries had a corresponding HR of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.88; P-trend = 0.003), whereas no significant associations were shown for fruit, fruit and berry juices, and vegetables. Conclusion: Fruit and vegetables, particularly berries, may reduce risk of T2D in men. Although obesity is the main risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D)5 ( 1 , 2 ), other modifiable factors, such as dietary constituents, may also play a role in the path Continue reading >>

Berries And Cream - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Berries And Cream - Recipes For Healthy Living By The American Diabetes Association

Fresh berries (a true power food!) and a dollop of creamy topping let you enjoy summer by the spoonful. This yummy dessert takes only five minutes to prepare. 1/2 cup sugar-free vanilla pudding (prepared with fat-free milk) In a small bowl, mix together the pudding and whipped topping. In a small bowl, mix together the blueberries and strawberries. For each serving, place 1 cup berries in a parfait or juice glass and top with 2 tablespoons pudding mixture. Dietitian Tip: A dessert that includes a whole serving of fruit is a great way to get more nutrition while enjoying something sweet. Garnish with mint leaves if desired. MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm all ingredients are gluten-free and this recipe can be made gluten-free. Photo: Berries & Cream. PNC Photography: Photographer: Peter Papoulakos. Let the tailgating and backyard barbeques begin, with some healthy tips and new recipes. Planning your day at a festival or fair can help you avoid spending a fortune and also keep your diabetes management on track with healthy choices. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's very active. This number estimates how many calories you should Continue reading >>

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

Fruits are the perfect snack. They are loaded with nutrients and fiber, relatively low in calories, and easy to bring to work. However, they do contain naturally occurring sugars, sometimes in large amounts. This can be a concern for those who struggle to manage their blood sugars. This article takes a science-based look at the most suitable fruits for diabetics. 1. Blueberries Blueberries are quite low in sugar, with 10 grams per 100 grams of fruit (1). But that sugar is also accompanied by 2 grams of fiber. This is important because when sugar and fiber are eaten together, blood sugar levels don’t spike as quickly (2, 3). It’s the reason 10 grams of sugar from fresh fruits will not have the same effect on blood sugar levels as 10 grams of sugar from a candy bar. In addition, blueberries provide loads of other beneficial nutrients and antioxidants that protect our cells from damage. Interestingly, a study on over 187,000 people tracked over two decades found those who ate the most blueberries had more than a 25% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who ate the fewest (4). Blueberries are great for a snack, and you can even enjoy them in salads. Although they can be particularly expensive, know that frozen blueberries are still nutritious and often much more affordable. 2. Strawberries Strawberries contain even less sugar than blueberries, with only 5 grams per 100 grams of fruit (5). This makes them a great choice for diabetics. They also provide fiber, manganese, folate, and a lot of vitamin C. In fact, 100 grams of strawberries (5-6 large strawberries) provides 98% of our daily vitamin C requirements. Strawberries are a great addition to breakfast foods like oats or yogurt, but they are also delicious on their own. 3. Blackberries Blackberries stand out as n Continue reading >>

Berries And Diabetes

Berries And Diabetes

Have you seen the latest meta-analysis from theEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition? The summary from Food Navigator USA really captures it best... Data from almost 400,000 people suggests that consuming berries and the anthocyanins they contain may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus by 15-18%. In other words, strong evidence indicates that consuming berries may be linked to a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. The goal of the study was "To investigate the associations of dietary intakes of anthocyanins and berry fruits with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk and to evaluate the potential doseresponse relationships based on prospective cohort studies" ( source ). Encouragingly, the anthocyanins in common berries appeared to lower the risk of diabetes among the hundreds of thousands of people in the studies. Anthocyanins are water-soluble pigments that belong in the flavonoid family, which in turn is a collection of phytochemicals. These compounds help fight oxidation and improve health. Want to share this information with your clients? Here's a free PDF handout just for you! Berry eaters may be at lower risk of diabetes: Meta-analysis Data from almost 400,000 people suggests that consuming berries and the anthocyanins they contain may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus by 15-18%. For other fantastic fruit materials, don't miss these resources from the Nutrition Education Store ... [shopify embed_type="product" shop="nutrition-education-store.myshopify.com" product_handle="fruit-photos-poster-12x18" show="all"] [shopify embed_type="product" shop="nutrition-education-store.myshopify.com" product_handle="fruit-shaped-sticky-pads-pack-of-10" show="all"] [shopify embed_type="product" shop="nutrition-education-store.myshopify.com" product_handle="i-heart- Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Top 5 Fruits For Diabetes-friendly Diets

Top 5 Fruits For Diabetes-friendly Diets

Fruit can be included in a diabetes-friendly diet. They are full of good nutritionvitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants. They taste good and are refreshing, filling, and add color to your plate. The key to eating fruit is to choose the right kinds and appropriate portion sizes. Because they can contain high amounts of carbohydratesthat can affect your blood sugar levels, you cannot eat unlimited amounts of fruit. Fruit Choices for Different Diabetes-FriendlyDiets What are the best fruits for diabetes? This can be a hard question to answer since people with diabetes adhere to varied diets and philosophies when it comes to diabetes management with food. Some people use exchange lists, whereas others stick to low-glycemic diets orlow-carb diets. Assuming most people want to know which fruits have the lowest carbs and offer the best health benefits for diabetes, then the following five berries deserve the spotlight. Raspberries:With merely15 grams of carbohydrate (1 fruit choice) in one cup serving, raspberries offer the highest amount of fiberof any berry, a whopping 8 grams. Fiber is the indigestible carbohydrate that helps to pull cholesterol away from the heart, helps you to feel full, and also slows down how quickly blood sugars rise.Raspberries'ruby-red color comes from anthocyanins. Research suggests that anthocyanins may help fend off certain chronic disease, including cardiovascular disease. Blackberries:They contain about 15 grams of carbohydrate in a 3/4 cup serving. As with raspberries, they have anthocyanins, as shown by their deep purple hue. Cranberries:There are 15 grams of carbohydratein one cup of fresh cranberries. Studies have shown that cranberries may help lower LDL(or bad cholesterol) and raise HDL (or good cholesterol) levels. However, sugar i Continue reading >>

A Berry Good Month: Berries And Diabetes

A Berry Good Month: Berries And Diabetes

A happy July Fourth to everyone. July brings many good things: sun, swimming, vacation and…berries. In fact, July just happens to be National Berry Month. Berries are superstars in the world of fruit. They’re full of nutrition, easy on blood sugars, and they happen to taste delicious, too. Let’s take a closer look at two popular berries available this month and why you should include them in your summer meal planning. Blueberries Blueberries have been enjoyed by people for hundreds of years. To this day, they remain popular, coming in after strawberries as the most popular berry in the United States. These little blue delicacies are literally bursting with a number of phytonutrients (plant-derived chemicals that may have health benefits), including anthocyanins, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, flavonols, and resveratrol. Don’t worry — you don’t need to remember these terms, but what you should know is that these phytonutrients provide both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, making blueberries a true superstar. Health benefits: Improved blood lipids: Eating between 1–2 cups of blueberries daily can lower LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and triglycerides (blood fats) and help raise HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Blood pressure: Studies show that folks with high blood pressure who routinely eat blueberries have both lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure; for people who have “normal” blood pressure, eating blueberries can help maintain healthy blood pressure. Cognitive function: The antioxidants in blueberries may protect nerve cells from oxidative damage; studies in both lab animals and in humans show that eating blueberries (or drinking blueberry juice) may help to preserve memory and even slow down decline in other cognitive funct Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Berry Diet For Diabetes

Berry Diet For Diabetes

Berries are ideal for a diabetic diet. Theyre sweet, delicious, and low on the glycemic index. The glycemic index is a scale on which carbohydrate-containing foods are ranked. Foods that have a high score quickly raise blood sugar, while foods with low scores only gradually raise blood sugar. Low ranking foods score below 55. Intermediate-GI foods score between 55 and 70. High GI foods score above 70. Fresh strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and raspberries all have scores below 40. If you have diabetes, the key to maintaining your blood sugar is to use portion control. Thanks to the low-carbohydrate density of strawberries, you can safely enjoy a 1-cup serving. The diabetic exchange for blueberries is 3/4 cup. The diabetic exchange for blackberries is 3/4 cup. The diabetic exchange for raspberries is 1 cup. Important to note: fruits such as berries contain fructose, a natural sugar that doesnt require insulin to be metabolized, so fruit tends to be well-tolerated. Strive to consume at least two servings of fruit each day, but monitor what works best for you. Continue reading >>

Eating Berries Have Eye-opening Results On Diabetes

Eating Berries Have Eye-opening Results On Diabetes

Eating Berries Have Eye-Opening Results On Diabetes Berries (all but cranberries, which are highly acidic) are some of the best fruit for a person with diabetes to eat. The alkaline fruits are delicious and sweet but one of the best things about them are that theyre low are the glycemic index. The glycemic index is a scientific representation which shows how carbohydrate-containing foods are ranked. Foods that have a high score on the charts rapidly raise blood sugar, and foods that score low raise blood sugar slowly. According to the chart, low ranking-GI foods score below 55, intermediate foods rank between 55 and 70 and high GI foods score above 70. Fresh raspberries, blackberries, strawberries and blueberries all have scores below 40. If a person has diabetes, the key to keeping their blood sugar under control is to both, consume foods with low glycemic indexes and to use portion control. Thanks to the low-carbohydrate density of berries diabetics could safely eat them. For diabetics, good serving sizes for berries are as such: Fruits like berries contain fructose, a natural sugar that doesnt require insulin to be metabolized. Strive to consume at least two servings of berries each day. Continue reading >>

Goji Berries And Diabetes

Goji Berries And Diabetes

Diabetes is caused due to defective insulin being produced, insufficient production of insulin or the inability of the body cells to utilize the insulin present in the body efficiently. The first condition is very uncommon. The last condition causes hyperglycemia that affects tissues and muscles and causes insulin resistance. This is type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, that is the lack of insulin, is the main type of diabetes that affects people. Diabetes is a chronic disorder that results in high levels of blood glucose. Insulin usually maintains the right levels of blood sugar. Insufficient production or lack of insulin causes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A test of blood glucose levels usually helps with diagnosing diabetes. Symptoms of diabetes excessive thirst, hunger, increased urine output, fatigue, weight loss despite increased hunger, vomiting, nausea, lethargy, blurred vision, vaginal, skin and bladder infections. If left untreated, diabetes can cause acute complications like dangerously high (hyperglycemia) or low (hypoglycemia) levels of blood sugar and chronic complications like damage to eyes, kidneys or nerves. A combination of diet, medication and exercise help with diabetes treatment. Goji berries belong to the Lycium chinense and Lycium barbarum specieis. These tiny berries grow on shrubs that can reach 1-3m in height. They are cultivated in the Himalayan regions of Tibet, Nepal, Mongolia and parts of China. The flowers are light purple and the berries are oblong and very tender. These orange-red berries need to be picked very carefully for otherwise they get destroyed. These fruits are dried and used just like raisins. A slow drying process at low temperatures is done to preserve the nutrition. While in most of the world, dried goji berries are used Continue reading >>

Do Blackberries Help Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Do Blackberries Help Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Do Blackberries Help Lower Your Blood Sugar? Blackberries have a number of healthy benefits. Fruits & Vegtables Good for Low Sugar Intake What you eat can influence your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar can lead to Type 2 diabetes. Blackberries pack a nutritional punch because they contain a number of polyphenols, plant substances that have health benefits, along with fiber and a low-carbohydrate count. While blackberries might help reduce blood sugar levels, they are not a substitute for medication if you have high blood sugar. Do not change your medication regimen without talking to your doctor. Blackberries, like many plants, contain substances called antioxidants. Polyphenols such as anthocyanins, substances that give blackberries their deep color, and ellagic acid are powerful antioxidants. Antioxidants help maintain health by destroying harmful substances in the body called free radicals. Free radicals can damage cellular DNA and allow the development of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Blackberries are an excellent source of vitamin C, which also has antioxidant properties. Most of the calories in blackberries come from carbohydrates. Fiber, a type of carbohydrate, passes through your intestinal tract undigested. Blackberries, like most plants, contain fiber. Fiber can be either soluble or insoluble. Eating foods high in soluble fiber can help lower your blood sugar by slowing the digestive process. Glucose enters your bloodstream at a slower rate when you eat a diet high in fiber. A slow, steady stream of glucose helps stabilize your blood sugar and prevents the rush of glucose into your bloodstream after a meal. Sharp rises in blood sugar can damage blood vessels and other tissues if you have diabetes. A 1/2-cup serving of blackberries contains 3.7 grams Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Not all healthy foods are created equal. Greens may be good for you, but the nutrients in iceberg lettuce may not be as plentiful as those in kale, spinach, and Swiss chard. Besides nutrient content, the glycemic index (GI) of a food may also help you make healthy choices. The GI measures how quickly a food will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods have a score of 55 or less, while high GI foods have a score of 70 or more. In general, lower GI foods are a better choice for people with diabetes. Foods that are both nutritious and have a low GI are helpful in managing health and blood glucose levels. Here are 10 superfoods that are especially good for those with diabetes. 1. Non-Starchy Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables have fewer carbs per serving. They include everything from artichokes and asparagus to broccoli and beets. This category of veggies goes a long way in satisfying your hunger and boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. These vegetables are also low in calories and carbohydrates, making them some of the few foods that people with diabetes can enjoy almost with abandon. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies most non-starchy vegetables as low GI foods with a ranking of 55 or less. A small study of 11 people found that a low-calorie diet consisting of non-starchy vegetables may successfully reverse type 2 diabetes. 2. Non-Fat or Low-Fat Plain Milk and Yogurt Vitamin D is essential for good health. One of its roles is to keep bones healthy, yet many of us don’t get as much as we need. Non-fat dairy foods, including milk and yogurt, are fortified with vitamin D. These dairy products are smart choices for diabetics because they have low GI scores: Skim milk has a GI score of 32 while reduced fat yogurt has a GI sco Continue reading >>

"berries Are A Diabetes-friendly Food"

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community to be as polite as possible , either your I:C ratios need an adjustment or they ( mixed berries)are something that doesn't suit you so best to avoid. have you done a carb counting course since diagnosis ? Perhaps some basal testing as well to make sure it is a spike from the berries ( or any food ) If it were me getting increased BG results from eating the same food -- i would speak to my care team and make appropriate adjustments to my insulin regime. What symptoms of DKA do you have @Steve14 ? If the berries don't suit you, perhaps you should go back to,strawberries? 'Diabetes friendly' is pretty meaningless when you have Type 1. You may still need to bolus for them. Something doesn't seem to be suiting you, for sure. May I ask; do you buy your berries fresh, or frozen? If you buy them fresh; do you sweeten them in any way? If you buy frozen, have you checked there's no added sugar on them? I know overseas, sometimes berries have a dusting of what would be icing sugar applied before freezing, supposedly in an attempt t prevent the berries adhering to each other. If your partner, say, prepares your berries, could they, without thinking, be adding any sugar or sweetener to your berries? Do you have the same reaction to these berries? No, eat berries most days (mainly blueberries) and don't get a weird after-taste and just bolus for the carbs they contain, as @azure says if they have that effect switch back to strawberries. I eat strawberries everyday , when I can't get an Continue reading >>

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