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Benefits Of Exercise In Diabetes

Exercising With Diabetes

Exercising With Diabetes

Exercise is paramount for good health and for managing your diabetes, plus it can be incredibly fun. Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, exercise plays a significant role in controlling your condition. Exercising with diabetes assists with maintaining your goal blood glucose levels, and it can help insulin or diabetes medications work more efficiently. Exercise also works to keep your blood pressure and cholesterol levels in check, helping to prevent long-term diabetes complications. In addition, exercise can actually help stabilize and regulate your blood glucose levels for hours—even after you stop exercising. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adults should strive for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise (eg, brisk walking) per week and 2 or more days a week doing muscle-strengthening exercises (eg, lifting weights).1 In addition, a well-rounded exercise routine should also incorporate flexibility (eg, yoga) exercises. But you don't have to fit in all your exercise requirements in on one day. In fact, you can break your workouts into smaller increments throughout the day. For example, instead of walking for 30 minutes straight, break it up into three 10-minute segments. If you're new to exercise, you can make an appointment with a physical therapist or personal trainer. They can teach you how to incorporate exercise into your lifestyle, as well as specific exercises you can do to help you manage your condition. We've broken this article into 2 sections: exercising with type 1 diabetes and exercising with type 2 diabetes. Exercising with Type 1 Diabetes When you exercise, your body—more specifically, your muscles—uses glucose as fuel (energy). Exercise has a similar effect as insulin on the glucos Continue reading >>

How Exercise Can Improve Your Diabetes

How Exercise Can Improve Your Diabetes

Exercise can do so much to improve diabetes and ward off its complications that there's just no excuse not to get started. Read more about the benefits of exercise for diabetes. Exercise is recommended for everyone and can help prevent conditions like type 2 diabetes, but even if you already have the condition, it’s not too late to get on the fitness bandwagon and reap the benefits of exercise. In fact, regular exercise can actually slow the progression of diabetes and make it easier to manage. Your muscles use glucose, or blood sugar, for fuel. Exercise causes your muscles to absorb glucose at nearly 20 times the normal rate. So when you exercise, you lower your blood sugar naturally, explains Erica Christ, RD, a certified diabetes educator at the Greenwich Hospital Weight Loss & Diabetes Center in Greenwich, Conn. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that people with type 2 diabetes get at least 150 minutes of exercise a week, or 30 minutes a day on five days of the week. Sound too daunting? Researchers at Canada’s McMaster University found that high-intensity interval training — 10 one-minute bursts of intense aerobic activity (at 90 percent of your maximum heart rate) with 1 minute of rest between each burst — lowered blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes for 24 hours afterwards. Lowering your blood sugar, which is your first concern in managing diabetes, is just one of the many benefits of exercise when you have type 2 diabetes. Here’s more: Exercise improves insulin sensitivity. Insulin is the hormone you need to allow glucose to enter your cells. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn't use insulin properly. Researchers in Italy found that resistance-training exercise can make your body’s insulin receptors more sensitive. Th Continue reading >>

Activity And Diabetes

Activity And Diabetes

Physical activity is another key part of your diabetes care plan. Be sure to speak with your health care provider before beginning or changing your physical activity plan. When you’re adding physical activity to your routine, it’s okay to take your time. If you haven’t been active, start with 5 to 10 minutes a day and increase your activity a few minutes each week until you reach your goal. Your health care provider can help you create a physical activity plan that's right for you and help make sure your plan is safe. Being Active Can Help You Lower Your Blood Sugar: Physical activity may help clear sugar from your blood. Some people with type 2 diabetes with a physical activity program may be able to manage their blood sugar with less medicine. Make sure you follow up with your health care provider before beginning or changing any physical activity. Then follow up with him or her to see if any changes need to be made to your diabetes treatment. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), besides diabetes benefits, being active can also: Lower blood pressure and cholesterol Improve your heart health Burn calories to help you keep a healthy weight Increase your energy Help you sleep Relieve stress Improve blood circulation Strengthen your muscles and bones Keep your joints flexible Improve your balance to lessen the risk of falling Continue reading >>

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

6 Great Exercises For People With Diabetes

iStock.com; Raymond Forbes/Stocksy; iStock.com Making Exercise a Routine Do you get enough exercise? If you're like many Americans, the answer is no — and that's especially true for those of us with diabetes. Studies show as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes participate in regular physical activity, compared with 58 percent of other Americans. And that's a shame, because working out can help increase insulin action and keep blood sugars in check, says Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, founder of the Diabetes Motion Academy in Santa Barbara, Califorinia, and professor emerita of exercise science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Exercise also helps you lose weight and improve balance, which is important because many people with type 2 diabetes are at risk for obesity and for falls. “I fully recommend that anyone over 40 with diabetes include balance training as part of their weekly routine, at least two to three days per week,” says Dr. Colberg-Ochs. “It can be as simple as practicing balancing on one leg at a time, or more complex — like tai chi exercises. Lower body and core resistance exercises also double as balance training.” Here are six great workouts you can easily work into your daily routine. Be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise regimen, and go slowly at first. Over time, you can increase the length and intensity of your routine. Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes

During physical activity, whole-body oxygen consumption may increase by as much as 20-fold, and even greater increases may occur in the working muscles. To meet its energy needs under these circumstances, skeletal muscle uses, at a greatly increased rate, its own stores of glycogen and triglycerides, as well as free fatty acids (FFAs) derived from the breakdown of adipose tissue triglycerides and glucose released from the liver. To preserve central nervous system function, blood glucose levels are remarkably well maintained during physical activity. Hypoglycemia during physical activity rarely occurs in nondiabetic individuals. The metabolic adjustments that preserve normoglycemia during physical activity are in large part hormonally mediated. A decrease in plasma insulin and the presence of glucagon appear to be necessary for the early increase in hepatic glucose production during physical activity, and during prolonged exercise, increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamines appear to play a key role. These hormonal adaptations are essentially lost in insulin-deficient patients with type 1 diabetes. As a consequence, when such individuals have too little insulin in their circulation due to inadequate therapy, an excessive release of counterinsulin hormones during physical activity may increase already high levels of glucose and ketone bodies and can even precipitate diabetic ketoacidosis. Conversely, the presence of high levels of insulin, due to exogenous insulin administration, can attenuate or even prevent the increased mobilization of glucose and other substrates induced by physical activity, and hypoglycemia may ensue. Similar concerns exist in patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin or sulfonylurea therapy; however, in general, hypoglycemia during physical act Continue reading >>

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Physical Activity/exercise And Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

The adoption and maintenance of physical activity are critical foci for blood glucose management and overall health in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes. Recommendations and precautions vary depending on individual characteristics and health status. In this Position Statement, we provide a clinically oriented review and evidence-based recommendations regarding physical activity and exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes mellitus, and prediabetes. Physical activity includes all movement that increases energy use, whereas exercise is planned, structured physical activity. Exercise improves blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes, reduces cardiovascular risk factors, contributes to weight loss, and improves well-being (1,2). Regular exercise may prevent or delay type 2 diabetes development (3). Regular exercise also has considerable health benefits for people with type 1 diabetes (e.g., improved cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, insulin sensitivity, etc.) (4). The challenges related to blood glucose management vary with diabetes type, activity type, and presence of diabetes-related complications (5,6). Physical activity and exercise recommendations, therefore, should be tailored to meet the specific needs of each individual. TYPES AND CLASSIFICATIONS OF DIABETES AND PREDIABETES Physical activity recommendations and precautions may vary by diabetes type. The primary types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (5%–10% of cases) results from cellular-mediated autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells, producing insulin deficiency (7). Although it can occur at any age, β-cell destruction rates vary, typically occurring more rapidly in youth than in adults. Type 2 diabetes (90%–95% of cases) resul Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Exercise In Treating Diabetes

The Importance Of Exercise In Treating Diabetes

Exercise benefits people with diabetes and those at risk for diabetes by helping manage weight, by improving blood sugar levels, and by improving heart health. For a person with diabetes, exercise is just as important as diet and medication. In fact, the American Diabetes Association recommends at least 30 minutes of physical activity that increases the heart rate five days per week. “Healthy diet and exercise are likely as strong as any medication I will ever prescribe for diabetes, and should be continued forever,” says Michael Heile, MD, a family medicine doctor at TriHealth’s Family Medical Group. It is important to design a lifelong exercise routine that is both attainable and enjoyable. Walking is one of the easiest and most convenient options, but you may want to explore new options, too! You should exercise at a comfortable pace and do not overexert yourself. If you adhere to a steady, regular program, you can expect these outcomes: Increased insulin sensitivity (insulin works better) Lower blood sugar levels Increased energy and endurance throughout the day Weight loss with increased muscle tone A healthier heart and lower blood pressure Better sleep at night Stronger bones and a lower risk of osteoporosis Better resistance to illness Improved cholesterol, heart rate, and blood pressure levels Lower stress, anxiety, boredom, frustration and depression The American Diabetes Association recommends two different types of exercise for managing diabetes: aerobic and strength training. Aerobic Exercise This exercise is done by using your arms and/or legs in a continuous, rhythmic movement in order to increase your heart rate. Examples include running, dancing, biking, swimming and walking. Be sure to pick an aerobic exercise that you enjoy and set realistic goa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise

Diabetes And Exercise

Exercise has many benefits for people with diabetes, especially when combined with healthy eating. Before you start exercising, make sure you have an individualised diabetes management plan, and a health check with your GP. An exercise physiologist can develop a personalised exercise plan for you. Check your blood glucose levels (BGLs) before, during and after exercise to see how the exercise you are doing affects them. If your BGLs are above the normal range increase your fluids to stay hydrated when you exercise. If you are unwell and your BGLs are high, avoid exercising until your BGLs have returned to the normal range. If you have type 1 diabetes and you are unwell, avoid exercise until you feel better to reduce your risk of ketoacidosis. Always carry portable hypoglycaemia treatment with you if you take insulin or sulphonylurea medication. If you have existing diabetes complications such as eye or kidney problems, check with your diabetes specialist if it is safe to do certain types of activity. On this page: Exercise has benefits for everyone, including people with diabetes, especially when combined with healthy eating. Benefits of exercise According to Australia’s Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines, it’s important to accumulate 2½ to 5 hours per week of moderate exercise or 1¼ to 2½ hours of vigorous exercise to obtain health benefits. This can be broken up throughout the week to suit your needs. Exercise helps to: improve mood and sleep improve muscle strength and bone mass lower blood glucose levels (BGLs) lower cholesterol and blood pressure improve heart and blood vessel health maintain or achieve a healthy body weight reduce stress and tension improve mental health If you are at risk of type 2 diabetes, exercise can be part of a heal Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Exercise

Benefits Of Exercise

Exercising 4–7 times per week for at least 30 minutes: Aerobic exercise, 4 to 7 times per week for at least 30 minutes, has a long list of health benefits. A few examples of aerobic exercise are brisk walking, swimming, cycling and dancing. Some of the benefits of exercise are: Usually lowers your blood sugar. Improves insulin sensitivity, which means your body’s insulin works better. Note: You may need an adjustment in your diabetes medication or insulin dose to help prevent the blood sugar from going too low. Ask your health care provider for advice. Reduces body fat. Helps to build and tone muscles. Lowers your risk for heart disease. Improves circulation. Preserves bone mass. Reduces stress and enhances quality of life. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes and Exercise, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Exercise For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Benefits Of Exercise For People With Diabetes?

Exercise has numerous benefits for people with diabetes. And even though you know that exercise is good for you, you may be reluctant to start -- just one more thing to keep track of and make sure you're doing it right. But exercise -- even just regular movement like gardening and housecleaning -- has many benefits for someone who has diabetes. These benefits include: lowering your blood sugar, both while you're exercising and after you finish increasing insulin sensitivity, so your cells absorb more sugar (glucose) from your bloodstream aiding weight loss and weight management decreasing risk for heart attack and stroke fighting abdominal fat, the dangerous kind that accumulates around the waistline reducing stress hormones, which contribute to numerous health problems releasing feel-good chemicals in the brain, which can improve your confidence and sense of control Beyond these major, proven benefits, exercise also may prevent certain cancers, improve your sex life, delay bone loss, preserve memory, boost your immune system, reduce arthritis and back pain, aid digestion, improve sleep and generally slow the problems associated with aging. Being active provides huge benefits, from lowering blood glucose (sugar), cholesterol and blood pressure to helping with weight loss and improving mood. The good news is that even for people who are not passionate about exercise, there are many ways to be active. Exercise is good for your diabetes because it makes sugar move out of your blood. It also helps your heart, your brain, your lungs, and your muscles all feel better and perform better. You don't need to work out at the gym. In fact, let's all get out our pens and strike out the word exercise and write the word activity above it. You really don't need to exercise so much as t Continue reading >>

Controlling Diabetes With Exercise

Controlling Diabetes With Exercise

Exercise is important for everyone, but it can be especially important for your health if you have diabetes. People who exercise regularly are better able to control their diabetes, thereby reducing their risk of diabetes complications. But despite these benefits, as few as 39 percent of people with type 2 diabetes get regular physical activity, according to a recent study. Diabetes and Exercise: Why It’s Important to Stay Fit If you have diabetes, you have an increased risk of developing certain health conditions, including heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, and nerve problems. By following your doctor's recommendations for keeping your blood glucose levels under control, you can reduce your risk of developing these complications. Researchers have found that people who exercise regularly have: Lower blood glucose levels Lower blood pressure Better cholesterol levels Improved ability to use insulin Decreased risk of stroke Stronger bones Less chance of falling Easier weight loss Less body fat More energy Reduced stress levels In addition, if you use insulin to treat your diabetes, exercise can be part of the daily schedule that you and your diabetes health care team develop to control your blood glucose levels. Diabetes and Exercise: Getting Started Talk with your diabetes health care team before you begin an exercise program. They can help you design an exercise program that is safe and effective for you. Make sure to ask about any limitations. If you have heart disease, kidney disease, eye problems, or foot problems, there may be some physical activities that you should not do. To get started with an exercise program: Find physical activities you like. Choose activities that you enjoy doing and that are convenient. Try new activities, such as walking, dancing, sw Continue reading >>

Exercise

Exercise

Everybody benefits from regular exercise. If you have diabetes, or are at risk of diabetes it plays an important role in keeping you healthy. For a person with diabetes exercise helps: Insulin to work better, which will improve your diabetes management Maintain a healthy weight Lower your blood pressure Reduce your risk of heart disease Reduce stress. Warning- Don’t take part in strenuous physical activity if you are feeling unwell or have ketones present in your blood or urine. Before commencing a regular exercise program see your doctor for a full medical examination. Initially take it slow - you don’t want to start off too hard, if you are not used to the exercise you will be sore the next day and this will not make exercising a fun experience! Over time, you can slowly increase the intensity of the exercise. If you have any diabetes complications like retinopathy, nephropathy, you should talk to your doctor or an accredited exercise physiologist before you start increasing the intensity of your exercise. Anything that gets you moving. Here are some suggestions for you to discuss with your doctor: Walking Swimming Cycling/ exercise bike Dancing Gardening Golfing Weight training Tai Chi Water aerobics Increasing your general physical activity is also helpful, e.g. taking the stairs instead of the lift, getting up to change the TV station instead of using the remote control, housework, and gardening. Avoid watching too much TV or sitting at the computer for a long time. For good health, you should be doing about 30 minutes of exercise every day. If this is not possible, then this time can be divided in 3 x 10 minutes sessions. You can break up exercise throughout the day. If you need to lose weight, 45-60 minutes everyday. You do not need to puff to gain the benefi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Benefits Of Exercise

Diabetes And The Benefits Of Exercise

People can rattle off a lot of reasons why they don't exercise, but most are just excuses. I don't have the time. It hurts too much. It takes too much effort. I don't see the point. I don't enjoy it. On the other hand, one could also rattle off a bunch of reasons why we could all benefit from regular physical activity. Not only can exercise help to prevent type 2 diabetes, it also helps to strengthen bone, improve energy, reduce stress, and support brain function. And exercise specifically targets three areas of great concern for those with diabetes: It's good for the heart. Cardiovascular disease complications can be blamed for up to 80% of deaths of people with diabetes. When we exercise, the muscles of the heart contract and boost blood flow through arteries, which triggers positive changes to resting heart rate and blood pressure. Regular exercise also helps to keep good and bad cholesterol at healthy levels. Good blood cholesterol and blood pressure levels lead to a decreased risk of heart and blood vessel disease. It helps us reach and maintain a healthy weight. At least 8 out of 10 people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Further, 1 in 5 overweight people are at risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of health problems that include high "bad" triglycerides, low "good" cholesterol, and high blood pressure. Combined together, these individual problems lead to an increased risk of health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Exercise is one of the most effective ways to lose excess weight. It helps us control our blood glucose levels. Insulin resistance refers to the body not responding to the insulin that is being made by the pancreas. Regular exercise helps to improve the body's sensitivity to insulin and helps to manage Continue reading >>

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