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Benefits Of Diabetes Self Management Education

2017 National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

2017 National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

By the most recent estimates, 30.3 million people in the U.S. have diabetes. An estimated 23.1 million have been diagnosed with diabetes and 7.2 million are believed to be living with undiagnosed diabetes. At the same time, 84.1 million people are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Thus, more than 114 million Americans are at risk for developing the devastating complications of diabetes (1). Diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) is a critical element of care for all people with diabetes. DSMES is the ongoing process of facilitating the knowledge, skills, and ability necessary for diabetes self-care, as well as activities that assist a person in implementing and sustaining the behaviors needed to manage his or her condition on an ongoing basis, beyond or outside of formal self-management training. In previous National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (Standards), DSMS and DSME were defined separately, but these Standards aim to reflect the value of ongoing support and multiple services. The Standards define timely, evidence-based, quality DSMES services that meet or exceed the Medicare diabetes self-management training (DSMT) regulations, however, these Standards do not guarantee reimbursement. These Standards provide evidence for all diabetes self-management education providers including those that do not plan to seek reimbursement for DSMES. The current Standards’ evidence clearly identifies the need to provide person-centered services that embrace the ever-increasing technological engagement platforms and systems. The hope is that payers will view these Standards as a tool for reviewing DSMES reimbursement requirements and consider change to align with the way their beneficiaries’ engagement preferences have evolved Continue reading >>

Effectiveness Of A Diabetes Education And Self Management Programme (desmond) For People With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Three Year Follow-up Of A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial In Primary Care

Effectiveness Of A Diabetes Education And Self Management Programme (desmond) For People With Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Three Year Follow-up Of A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial In Primary Care

Abstract Objective To measure whether the benefits of a single education and self management structured programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus are sustained at three years. Design Three year follow-up of a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care, with randomisation at practice level. Setting 207 general practices in 13 primary care sites in the United Kingdom. Participants 731 of the 824 participants included in the original trial were eligible for follow-up. Biomedical data were collected on 604 (82.6%) and questionnaire data on 513 (70.1%) participants. Intervention A structured group education programme for six hours delivered in the community by two trained healthcare professional educators compared with usual care. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. The secondary outcomes were blood pressure, weight, blood lipid levels, smoking status, physical activity, quality of life, beliefs about illness, depression, emotional impact of diabetes, and drug use at three years. Results HbA1c levels at three years had decreased in both groups. After adjusting for baseline and cluster the difference was not significant (difference −0.02, 95% confidence interval −0.22 to 0.17). The groups did not differ for the other biomedical and lifestyle outcomes and drug use. The significant benefits in the intervention group across four out of five health beliefs seen at 12 months were sustained at three years (P<0.01). Depression scores and quality of life did not differ at three years. Conclusion A single programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus showed no difference in biomedical or lifestyle outcomes at three years although there were sustained improvements in so Continue reading >>

Review Article Diabetes Self-management Education For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review Of The Effect On Glycemic Control

Review Article Diabetes Self-management Education For Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review Of The Effect On Glycemic Control

Highlights • DSME appears most effective when group and individualized intervention are combined (74). • DSME appears most effective delivered by a team rather than single provider (65). • People in poor glycemic control benefit from participation in quality DSME (65). • More than 10 hours of DSME increases the likelihood of resulting in significant A1C improvement (84). • Time period over which DSME is delivered does not affect its impact on A1C (62). Abstract Assess effect of diabetes self-management education and support methods, providers, duration, and contact time on glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, and PsycINFO to December 2013 for interventions which included elements to improve participants’ knowledge, skills, and ability to perform self-management activities as well as informed decision-making around goal setting. This review included 118 unique interventions, with 61.9% reporting significant changes in A1C. Overall mean reduction in A1C was 0.74 and 0.17 for intervention and control groups; an average absolute reduction in A1C of 0.57. A combination of group and individual engagement results in the largest decreases in A1C (0.88). Contact hours ≥10 were associated with a greater proportion of interventions with significant reduction in A1C (70.3%). In patients with persistently elevated glycemic values (A1C > 9), a greater proportion of studies reported statistically significant reduction in A1C (83.9%). This systematic review found robust data demonstrating that engagement in diabetes self-management education results in a statistically significant decrease in A1C levels. The data suggest mode of delivery, hours of engagement, and baseline A1C can affect the likelihood of achieving stat Continue reading >>

Tdc Tool Kit - Dsme Information

Tdc Tool Kit - Dsme Information

Diabetes Self-Management Join forces with the experts. You are the expert in caring for your patients. Diabetes educators are experts in helping people manage diabetes. Together, you form a team to help patients with diabetes adopt positive changes that delay or prevent complications. Why collaborate with a diabetes educator? Diabetes educators provide a level of attention that you can’t achieve in short office visits. They coach patients to understand diabetes in the context of their own lives and work with them to set – and meet – behavior changes to improve their health. And they keep you informed about patient progress at every step. Diabetes educators enhance your practice by: Spending more time with patients as they provide training, counseling, and follow-up. Helping you meet pay-for-performance and quality improvement goals. Providing status reports about patient progress. Emphasizing the role that self-management plays in preventing the onset of diabetes-related health complications. Visit the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) to learn more about making a referral and finding a licensed diabetes educator near you. Website for Patients: Prevent and Manage Diabetes Empowering your patients is strong medicine. Help patients answer questions about diabetes prevention and management with this website, available in English and Spanish. Download Materials Order Form for Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) and Medical Nutrition Therapy This form was created to capture all information required for successful patient referral. The back of the form has helpful information about DSME, including an algorithm describing when patients should be referred for additional services. Intended Use: This form is a guide for use by primary care physicians o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management Education

Diabetes Self-management Education

Module Sections Programs in Your Area Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) programs are conveniently located in nearly all of Wisconsin’s 72 counties. Click on the program names below and follow instructions to locate programs in your immediate area. Most Wisconsin Tribal Health Programs provide diabetes education as well, although they are not ADA-Recognized or AADA-Accredited. If your community does not have a DSME program, you may want to consider referring patients to the more general Living Well with Chronic Conditions evidence-based classes. Reimbursement for Services MEDICARE has very specific coverage policies for DSMT. A specific number of DSMT services are covered if the diagnosis of diabetes follows the Medicare-specific definition, the treating physician or qualified non-physician practitioner documents that these services are necessary, and the education program is accredited. Medicare requires the DSMT program to be accredited by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE), American Diabetes Association (ADA) or the Indian Health Service (IHS) to qualify for reimbursement. Reference for these specific requirements can be retrieved from the Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service (2011). COMMERCIAL INSURERS may pay for services provided by DSME/T programs that have no formal recognition. Some commercial insurers require prior authorization for diabetes education. Wisconsin mandate for diabetes education and supplies Diabetes education or diabetes self-management education/training (DSME/DSMT) is an interactive, ongoing process of training, counseling and support that diabetes educators provide to persons with diabetes and their caregiver or families. Diabetes educators (often known as certified diabe Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Diabetes Self-management For Health Plan Members: A 6-month Translation Study

Benefits Of Diabetes Self-management For Health Plan Members: A 6-month Translation Study

Background: Diabetes self-management education has been shown to be effective in controlled trials. However, few programs that meet American Association of Diabetes Educators standards have been translated into widespread practice. Objective: This study examined the translation of the evidence-based Better Choices, Better Health-Diabetes program in both Internet and face-to-face versions. Methods: We administered the Internet program nationally in the United States (n=1010). We conducted face-to-face workshops in Atlanta, Georgia; Indianapolis, Indiana; and St. Louis, Missouri (n=232). Self-report questionnaires collected health indicator, health behavior, and health care utilization measures. Questionnaires were administered on the Web or by mail. We determined hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from blood samples collected via mailed kits. Paired t tests determined whether changes between baseline and 6 months differed significantly from no change. Subgroup analyses determined whether participants with specific conditions benefited (high HbA1c, depression, hypoglycemia, nonadherence to medication taking, and no aerobic exercise). We calculated the percentage of participants with improvements of at least 0.4 effect size in at least one of the 5 above measures. Results: Of the 1242 participants, 884 provided 6-month follow-up questionnaires. There were statistically significant improvements in 6 of 7 health indicators (including HbA1c) and in 7 of 7 behaviors. For each of the 5 conditions, there were significant improvements among those with the condition (effect sizes 0.59–1.1). A total of 662 (75.0%) of study participants improved at least 0.4 effect size in at least one criterion, and 327 (37.1%) improved in 2 or more. Conclusions: The Diabetes Self-Management Program, offered Continue reading >>

Thousands Benefit From Diabetes-self Management Education In South Texas

Thousands Benefit From Diabetes-self Management Education In South Texas

Daniel felt weak. On most days, when he came home from working at his rental business in Corpus Christi, TX, he’d lay on the couch and sleep the evening away, leaving little time or motivation to enjoy his many hobbies. His wife took notice and encouraged him to visit his doctor, where he found out he’d been living with diabetes, likely for some time. His kids’ smiles flashed before his eyes and struck his heart—he had lost too many friends to uncontrolled diabetes, and today would not be his day. Daniel is among the nearly one in four (20%) adults in South Texas that has been diagnosed with diabetes, but even more have it and don’t know it. In the Coastal Bend, more than 31 percent of adults are overweight and 42 percent are obese, meaning nearly three quarters of Coastal Bend residents are at increased risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. In response to this epidemic, the Texas A&M Health Science Center Coastal Bend Health Education Center (CBHEC) provides resources to residents and health professionals of the Coastal Bend on how to prevent and control the disease. Just days after receiving his diagnosis, Daniel registered for CBHEC’s Diabetes Education Program. Accredited by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the program provides support to prevent onset of type 2 diabetes and to keep the disease under control once diagnosed. In addition, community events offer programs to schools and workplaces across the Coastal Bend. Last year, nearly 3,000 people were touched by the efforts of the program. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a critical part of care for those with diabetes and, according to the ADA, is necessary in order to improve patient outcomes. CBHEC’S DSME classes are offered in English and Spanish to provide guidance with blood Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self Management Education

Diabetes Self Management Education

Diabetes self-management education and support has been shown to be cost-effective by reducing hospital admissions and readmissions (10 (link is external)–12 (link is external)), as well as estimated lifetime health care costs related to a lower risk for complications (13 (link is external)). Given that the cost of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012 was reported to be $245 billion (14 (link is external)), DSME/S offers an opportunity to decrease these costs (11 (link is external),12 (link is external)). It has been projected that one in three individuals will develop type 2 diabetes by 2050 (15 (link is external)). The U.S. health care system will be unable to afford the costs of care unless incidence rates and diabetes-related complications are reduced. DSME/S improves hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by as much as 1% in people with type 2 diabetes (3 (link is external),7 (link is external),16 (link is external)–20 (link is external)). Besides this important reduction, DSME has a positive effect on other clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral aspects of diabetes. DSME/S is reported to reduce the onset and/or advancement of diabetes complications (21 (link is external),22 (link is external)), to improve quality of life (19 (link is external),23 (link is external)–26 (link is external)) and lifestyle behaviors such as having a more healthful eating pattern and engaging in regular physical activity (27 (link is external)), to enhance self-efficacy and empowerment (28 (link is external)), to increase healthy coping (29 (link is external)), and to decrease the presence of diabetes-related distress (16 (link is external),30 (link is external)) and depression (31 (link is external),32 (link is external)). These improvements clearly reaffirm the importance and value-added benefit of DSM Continue reading >>

2017 National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

2017 National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support facilitates the knowledge, skills, and ability necessary for diabetes self-care as well as activities that assist a person in implementing and sustaining the behaviors needed to manage their condition on an ongoing basis. The evidence indicates that health care providers and people affected by diabetes are embracing technology, and this is having a positive impact of DSMES access, utilization, and outcomes. Quality DSMES continues to be a critical element of care for all people with diabetes. The DSMES services must be individualized and guided by the concerns, preferences, and needs of the person affected by diabetes. Even with the abundance of evidence supporting the benefits of DSMES, it continues to be underutilized, but as with other health care services, technology is changing the way DSMES is delivered and utilized with positive outcomes. Continue reading >>

National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

By the most recent estimates, 18.8 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with diabetes and an additional 7 million are believed to be living with undiagnosed diabetes. At the same time, 79 million people are estimated to have blood glucose levels in the range of prediabetes or categories of increased risk for diabetes. Thus, more than 100 million Americans are at risk for developing the devastating complications of diabetes (1). Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a critical element of care for all people with diabetes and those at risk for developing the disease. It is necessary in order to prevent or delay the complications of diabetes (2–6) and has elements related to lifestyle changes that are also essential for individuals with prediabetes as part of efforts to prevent the disease (7,8). The National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education are designed to define quality DSME and support and to assist diabetes educators in providing evidence-based education and self-management support. The Standards are applicable to educators in solo practice as well as those in large multicenter programs—and everyone in between. There are many good models for the provision of diabetes education and support. The Standards do not endorse any one approach, but rather seek to delineate the commonalities among effective and excellent self-management education strategies. These are the standards used in the field for recognition and accreditation. They also serve as a guide for nonaccredited and nonrecognized providers and programs. Because of the dynamic nature of health care and diabetes-related research, the Standards are reviewed and revised approximately every 5 years by key stakeholders and experts within the diabetes education community. In the fall Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management Education: More Is Better

Diabetes Self-management Education: More Is Better

There has been a growing understanding about the benefits of diabetes self-management education (DSME) in recent years. One of the key findings guiding the most recent research and intervention efforts in this field is the growing evidence of the sustainability of improvements and behavioural changes made during DSME. We now understand that improvements made during education tend to fade after 6 months (1-3). While some might view this as evidence that DSME is ineffective, in reality the contrary is true. To access this article, please choose from the options below Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management Education And Support In Type 2 Diabetes: A Joint Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association, The American Association Of Diabetes Educators, And The Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics

Diabetes Self-management Education And Support In Type 2 Diabetes: A Joint Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association, The American Association Of Diabetes Educators, And The Academy Of Nutrition And Dietetics

Diabetes is a chronic disease that requires a person with diabetes to make a multitude of daily self-management decisions and to perform complex care activities. Diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) provides the foundation to help people with diabetes to navigate these decisions and activities and has been shown to improve health outcomes (1–7). Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is the process of facilitating the knowledge, skill, and ability necessary for diabetes self-care. Diabetes self-management support (DSMS) refers to the support that is required for implementing and sustaining coping skills and behaviors needed to self-manage on an ongoing basis. (See further definitions in Table 1.) Although different members of the health care team and community can contribute to this process, it is important for health care providers and their practice settings to have the resources and a systematic referral process to ensure that patients with type 2 diabetes receive both DSME and DSMS in a consistent manner. The initial DSME is typically provided by a health professional, whereas ongoing support can be provided by personnel within a practice and a variety of community-based resources. DSME/S programs are designed to address the patient’s health beliefs, cultural needs, current knowledge, physical limitations, emotional concerns, family support, financial status, medical history, health literacy, numeracy, and other factors that influence each person’s ability to meet the challenges of self-management. It is the position of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) that all individuals with diabetes receive DSME/S at diagnosis and as needed thereafter (8). This position statement focuses on the particular needs of individuals with type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management Education And Support (dsmes)

Diabetes Self-management Education And Support (dsmes)

Are you or a loved one having to think about or take care of diabetes? Don't go it alone! Helpful professionals will listen and help you make a plan to feel better, reduce diabetes complications and improve your health. It's called Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support (DSMES). What do diabetes educators do? They: Find out what your needs are for caring for or managing your diabetes. Find out what your personal goals are for managing or preventing diabetes, or its complications. Help you design a plan of action to make changes that meet your goals but still fit into your life. Give you the tools and know-how you need to take care of your diabetes. Support you now and in the future as you live with and manage diabetes. Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support sounds like a lot. But, really, it is all about YOU and what you want! Feel better when living with diabetes. Professional diabetes educators and DSMES can help! Hospital or Health Department Based Programs in Michigan (Accept Medicaid and Other Insurance) View a list sorted by hospital name Search for a program near you Who is Eligible? People with diabetes that are newly diagnosed have had a change in treatment or condition have never received comprehensive diabetes self-management education Meeting these conditions does not assure coverage. Most people can meet with their diabetes educator yearly as needed. Four Critical Times To Consider a Referral to DSMES In June, 2015, a joint statement regarding Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support was released by the American Diabetes Association, American Association of Diabetes Educators and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. At Diagnosis: All newly diagnosed persons with type 2 diabetes should receive DSME. Annually: All persons with diabete Continue reading >>

Dsme Support In Diabetes

Dsme Support In Diabetes

Powers et al 1 Margaret A. Powers, PhD, RD Joan Bardsley, MBA, RN Marjorie Cypress, PhD, RN, CNP Paulina Duker, MPN, RN Martha M. Funnell, MS, RN Amy Hess Fischl, MS, RD Melinda D. Maryniuk, MEd, RD Linda Siminerio, RN, PhD Eva Vivian, PharmD, MS From International Diabetes Center at Park Nicollet, Minneapolis, Minnesota (Dr Powers); MedStar Health Research Institute and MedStar Nursing, Hyattsville, Maryland (Ms Bardsley); ABQ Health Partners, Albuquerque, New Mexico (Dr Cypress); LifeScan, a Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Solutions Company, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (Ms Duker); University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan (Ms Funnell); University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (Ms Fischl); Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, Massachusetts (Ms Maryniuk); School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Siminerio); and University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (Dr Vivian). Correspondence to Margaret A. Powers, International Diabetes Center at Park Nicollet, Minneapolis, MN 55416-2699, USA. ([email protected]). Acknowledgments: The authors gratefully acknowledge the commitment and support of the collabo- rating organizations—the American Association of Diabetes Educators, the American Diabetes Association, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics; their colleagues, including members of the Executive Committee of the National Diabetes Education Program, who participated in discussions and reviews about this inaugural position statement; and patients who teach and inspire them. The authors also thank Erika Gebel Berg (American Diabetes Association) for her invaluable editorial contribution. The position statement was reviewed and approved by the Professional Practice Committee of the American Associa Continue reading >>

Address Correspondence To:

Address Correspondence To:

Katherine Pereira, DNP, RN, FNP-BC, ADM-BC, Beth Phillips, MSN, Constance Johnson, PhD, and Allison Vorderstrasse, DNSc Background: Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of successful diabetes management. Various methods have been used to reach the increasing numbers of patients with diabetes, including Internet-based education. The purpose of this article is to review various delivery methods of Internet diabetes education that have been evaluated, as well as their effectiveness in improving diabetes-related outcomes. Materials and Methods: Literature was identified in the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Medline, EBSCO, the Cochrane Library, and the Web of Science databases through searches using the following terms: “type 2 diabetes AND internet/web based AND education” and “type 2 diabetes AND diabetes self-management education (DSME) AND web-based/internet OR technology assisted education.” The search was limited to English language articles published in the last 10 years. The search yielded 111 articles; of these, 14 met criteria for inclusion in this review. Nine studies were randomized controlled trials, and study lengths varied from 2 weeks to 24 months, for a total of 2,802 participants. Results: DSME delivered via the Internet is effective at improving measures of glycemic control and diabetes knowledge compared with usual care. In addition, results demonstrate that improved eating habits and increased attendance at clinic appointments occur after the online DSME, although engagement and usage of Internet materials waned over time. Interventions that included an element of interaction with healthcare providers were seen as attractive to participants. Conclusions: Internet-delivered diabetes educa Continue reading >>

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