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Before 1997 The Fasting Sugar Limit For Diabetes Was 140

Doctors Are Conspiring To Convince You You're Sick!

Doctors Are Conspiring To Convince You You're Sick!

An error occurred while trying to search with Solr: Solr endpoint unreachable. Doctors are conspiring to convince you you're sick! How do doctors decide what is healthy and unhealthy? Do they arbitrarily decide on risk factors to line their pockets - creating false epidemics as Sandy Szwarc at Junkfood Science suggests ? Or, is there actually a science, called epidemiology, that is the basis for health recommendations? As I've said repeatedly, one of the sure signs you're about to hear total BS is if someone suggests there is some conspiracy by scientists or doctors to hide the truth. In an article challenging the use of serum troponin levels to determine whether myocardial infarction (MI) has occurred (a more sensitive method) Sandy suggests this is yet another example of doctors lowering metrics of illness and risk to generate the impression of false epidemics. There must be a health crisis to bring the greatest funding for research, treatments and education... even if an epidemic has to be created. One of the most common tactics is to change the definition. When diagnostic criteria is broadened, suddenly, with the stroke of a pen, new cases can appear to explode in number. With heart disease deaths dropping dramatically for the past half century, the world's top four organizations representing heart disease interests have all gotten together to change the definition ... of a heart attack. The World Heart Federation, American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology have been championing the new criteria over recent years, and will officially release it next month in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and in the AHA journal, Circulation. The new definition will use elevations of troponin levels, rather th Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Glucose Level For Someone With Diabetes?

What Is A Normal Blood Glucose Level For Someone With Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Glucose: The Silent Killer

Glucose: The Silent Killer

The deadly effects of even slightly elevated glucose are fatally misunderstood. One reason for this calamity is physicians who continue to rely on obsolete blood glucose ranges. These doctors fail to recognize that any excess glucose creates lethal metabolic pathologies that are underlying factors behind multiple age-related diseases. People today thus suffer and die from diabetic-like complications without knowing their blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high! Life Extension long ago argued that most aging people have elevated blood glucose. Our controversial position has been vindicated as mainstream medicine consistently lowers the upper-level threshold of acceptable (safe) fasting blood glucose. As new evidence accumulates, it has become abundantly clear that maturing individuals need to take aggressive actions to ensure their fasting and after-meal glucose levels are kept in safe ranges. Our bodys primary source of energy is glucose. All of our cells use it, and when there is not enough glucose available, our body shuts down in a similar way that a car engine stops when the gasoline tank is empty. When glucose is properly utilized, our cells produce energy efficiently. As cellular sensitivity to insulin diminishes, excess glucose accumulates in our bloodstream. Like spilled gasoline, excess blood glucose creates a highly combustible environment from which oxidative and inflammatory fires chronically erupt. Excess glucose not used for energy production converts to triglycerides that are either stored as unwanted body fat or accumulate in the blood where they contribute to the formation of atherosclerotic plaque.1-6 If you were filling your automobile with gasoline and the tank reached full, you would not keep pumping in more gas. Yet most people keep fueling thei Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

The latest article in our Clinical Practice series reviews recommendations for diabetes screening, which vary with respect to whether and how to screen. The American Diabetes Association recommends screening persons 45 of age or older or with other risk factors by means of fasting glucose or glycated hemoglobin testing. Type 2 diabetes is a complex disease that is typically diagnosed in midlife and is characterized by progressive defects in insulin secretion and action. In the context of increased caloric intake and decreased activity levels in Westernized societies, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to climb. Clinical Pearls • Why did the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) lower the diagnostic threshold for diabetes from a fasting plasma glucose level of 140 mg per deciliter to 126 mg per deciliter in 1997? Before 1997, the diagnosis of diabetes was defined by the ADA and the WHO as a fasting plasma glucose level of 140 mg per deciliter or more or a 2-hour plasma glucose level of 200 mg per deciliter or more during an oral glucose-tolerance test conducted with a standard loading dose of 75 g. In 1997, with recommendations from the Expert Committee on the Diagnosis and Classification of Diabetes Mellitus, the ADA and the WHO lowered the diagnostic threshold to a fasting plasma glucose level of 126 mg per deciliter — the level at which a unique microvascular complication of diabetes, retinopathy, becomes detectable. • What is the approximate annualized risk of diabetes among patients with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose? Longitudinal investigations have shown that persons categorized as being “impaired” by virtue of having impaired glucose tolerance (as identified on the basis of a 2-hour Continue reading >>

Normal Fasting Plasma Glucose Levels And Type 2 Diabetes In Young Men

Normal Fasting Plasma Glucose Levels And Type 2 Diabetes In Young Men

Normal Fasting Plasma Glucose Levels and Type 2 Diabetes in Young Men The normal fasting plasma glucose level was recently defined as less than 100 mg per deciliter (5.55 mmol per liter). Whether higher fasting plasma glucose levels within this range independently predict type 2 diabetes in young adults is unclear. We obtained blood measurements, data from physical examinations, and medical and lifestyle information from men in the Israel Defense Forces who were 26 to 45 years of age. A total of 208 incident cases of type 2 diabetes occurred during 74,309 person-years of follow-up (from 1992 through 2004) among 13,163 subjects who had baseline fasting plasma glucose levels of less than 100 mg per deciliter. A multivariate model, adjusted for age, family history of diabetes, body-mass index, physical-activity level, smoking status, and serum triglyceride levels, revealed a progressively increased risk of type 2 diabetes in men with fasting plasma glucose levels of 87 mg per deciliter (4.83 mmol per liter) or more, as compared with those whose levels were in the bottom quintile (less than 81 mg per deciliter [4.5 mmol per liter], P for trend <0.001). In multivariate models, men with serum triglyceride levels of 150 mg per deciliter (1.69 mmol per liter) or more, combined with fasting plasma glucose levels of 91 to 99 mg per deciliter (5.05 to 5.50 mmol per liter), had a hazard ratio of 8.23 (95 percent confidence interval, 3.6 to 19.0) for diabetes, as compared with men with a combined triglyceride level of less than 150 mg per deciliter and fasting glucose levels of less than 86 mg per deciliter (4.77 mmol per liter). The joint effect of a body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of 30 or more and a fasting plasma glucose l Continue reading >>

Changing Standards For Diagnosis

Changing Standards For Diagnosis

In 1997, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the federal government lowered the per se standard for diagnosing diabetes from a fasting blood glucose level of 140 mg/dL to 126 mg/dL.7 The CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report notes that "the potential impact on the prevalence estimates of the change in diagnosis of diabetes adopted by the ADA in 1997 should be accounted for." However, the CDC's estimate of a 61 percent increase fails to account for changes in how diabetes is diagnosed. The ADA's "Report of the Expert Committee on the Diagnosis and Classification of Diabetes Mellitus" notes: "Widespread adoption of the new criteria may, however, have a large impact on the number of people actually diagnosed with diabetes. Presently, about half the adults with diabetes in the U.S. are undiagnosed, but many might now be diagnosed if the simpler FPG [Fasting Plasma Glucose] test were always used." Doctors Steven Woolf and Stephen Rothemich from Virginia Commonwealth University report in the journal American Family Physician that among American adults this redefinition increased the number of diabetics by nearly 50 percent: "Lowering the diagnostic threshold shifts the definition of diabetes into the central bulge of the bell curve where the glucose level of most Americans falls. Among U.S. adults 40 to 74 years of age who have not been diagnosed with diabetes, 1.9 million have fasting plasma glucose levels of 126 to 140 mg per dL (7.0 to 7.8 mmol per L), which is almost as many as the 2.2 million who have levels over 140 mg per dL (7.8 mmol per L). Under the new guidelines, at least 1 million Americans (and possibly more) with fasting plasma glucose levels of 126 to 140 mg per dL (7.0 to 7.8 mmol per L), who previously would have been told that they had normal Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is the precursor stage before diabetes mellitus in which not all of the symptoms required to diagnose diabetes are present, but blood sugar is abnormally high. This stage is often referred to as the "grey area."[1] It is not a disease; the American Diabetes Association says,[2] "Prediabetes should not be viewed as a clinical entity in its own right but rather as an increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Prediabetes is associated with obesity (especially abdominal or visceral obesity), dyslipidemia with high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension."[2] It is thus a metabolic diathesis or syndrome, and it usually involves no symptoms and only high blood sugar as the sole sign. Impaired fasting blood sugar and impaired glucose tolerance are two forms of prediabetes that are similar in clinical definition (glucose levels too high for their context) but are physiologically distinct.[3] Insulin resistance, the insulin resistance syndrome (metabolic syndrome or syndrome X), and prediabetes are closely related to one another and have overlapping aspects. Classification[edit] Impaired fasting glucose[edit] Main article: Impaired fasting glycaemia Impaired fasting glycaemia or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) refers to a condition in which the fasting blood glucose or the 3-month average blood glucose (A1C) is elevated above what is considered normal levels but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus. It is considered a pre-diabetic state, associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology, although of lesser risk than impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG sometimes progresses to type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a 50% risk over 10 years of progressing to overt diabetes. Many newl Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Guidelines: A Closer Look At The Evidence

New Diabetes Guidelines: A Closer Look At The Evidence

New Diabetes Guidelines: A Closer Look at the Evidence STEVEN H. WOOLF, M.D., M.P.H., and STEPHEN F. ROTHEMICH, M.D., Medical College of Virginia at Virginia, Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia Am Fam Physician.1998Oct15;58(6):1287-1290. In this issue of American Family Physician, Mayfield 1 summarizes recent recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), which broaden the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus and advocate routine screening. Under the new guidelines, 2 the threshold fasting plasma glucose level for the diagnosis of diabetes has been lowered from 140 mg per dL (7.8 mmol per L) to 126 mg per dL (7.0 mmol per L). Screening is recommended every three years, beginning at age 45 (or earlier in high-risk groups). These recommendations have broad implications. Lowering the diagnostic threshold shifts the definition of diabetes into the central bulge of the bell curve where the glucose level of most Americans falls. Among U.S. adults 40 to 74 years of age who have not been diagnosed with diabetes, 1.9 million have fasting plasma glucose levels of 126 to 140 mg per dL (7.0 to 7.8 mmol per L), which is almost as many as the 2.2 million who have levels over 140 mg per dL (7.8 mmol per L). Under the new guidelines, at least 1 million Americans (and possibly more) with fasting plasma glucose levels of 126 to 140 mg per dL (7.0 to 7.8 mmol per L), who previously would have been told that they had normal (or impaired) glucose tolerance, will now be informed that they harbor a disease. 3 This more aggressive policy has strong support among those committed to detecting diabetes earlier and in larger numbers. The new threshold will certainly do this, but clinicians should look closely at the evidence and consider the potential harms before chang Continue reading >>

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

Your blood sugar levels are a critical part of your overall health and your bodys ability to function properly on a daily basis. For those of us with diabetes, striving to achieve normal blood sugar levels is a constant, hour-by-hour pursuit. And it isnt easy. In this article, well look at normal blood sugar levels and goal ranges for a non-diabetics body, and realistic blood sugar goals for people with prediabetes , type 1, and type 2 diabetes. Still frustrated with your blood sugar and A1c results? Normal blood sugar ranges in healthy non-diabetics For a person without any type of diabetes, blood sugar levels are generally between 70 to 130 mg/dL depending on the time of day and the last time they ate a meal. Newer theories about non-diabetic blood sugar levels have included post-meal blood sugar levels as high as 140 mg/dL. (If you live outside the US and are used to measures in mmol/L, just divide all numbers by 18) Here are the normal blood sugar ranges for a person without diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association : Fasting blood sugar (in the morning, before eating): 70 to 90 mg/dL 5 or more hours after eating: 70 to 90 mg/dL Diagnosing prediabetes, type 2, and type 1 diabetes According to the American Diabetes Association , the following blood sugar and A1c results are used to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes: 2 hours after a meal: 140 mg/dL to 199 mg/dL 2 hours after a meal: 200 mg/dL or higher Please note: Type 1 diabetes tends to develop very quickly which means that by the time symptoms are felt, blood sugar levels are generally well above 200 mg/dL all the time. For many, symptoms come on so quickly they are dismissed as the lingering flu or another seemingly ordinary virus. By the time blood sugar levels are tested, many newly diagnosed typ Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet Fasting, as the name suggests, means refraining from eating of drinking any liquids other than water for eight hours. It is used as a test for diabetes. After fasting, a carbohydrate metabolism test is conducted which measures blood glucose levels. Glucagon during fasting When fasting the hormone glucagon is stimulated and this increases plasma glucose levels in the body. If a patient doesn’t have diabetes, their body will produce insulin to rebalance the increased glucose levels. However people with diabetes either don’t produce enough insulin to rebalance their blood sugar (typically in type 1 diabetes) or their body is not able to use the insulin effectively enough (typical of type 2 diabetes). Consequently when blood glucose levels are tested, people with diabetes will have blood sugar levels significantly higher than people who do not have diabetes. What is the fasting blood sugar test used for? The fasting blood sugar test is also used to test the effectiveness of different medication or dietary changes on people already diagnosed as diabetic. Fasting tests The fasting test should be conducted on two separate occasions to ensure consistent results and in order to avoid a false diagnosis. This is the case as increased blood glucose levels may be as a result of Cushing’s syndrome liver or kidney disease, eclampsia and pancreatitis. However many of these conditions are often picked up in lab diagnostic tests. Fasting test results The results of a fasting test with respect to glucose levels in the body are as follows: Normal: 3.9 to 5.5 mmols/l (70 to 100 mg/dl) Prediabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance: 5.6 to 7.0 mmol/l (101 to 126 mg/dl) Diagnosis of diabetes: more than 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) The American Diabetes Association reduced the level of diagno Continue reading >>

Could Slightly High Blood Sugar Cause Neuropathy?

Could Slightly High Blood Sugar Cause Neuropathy?

My glucose levels usually run between 120 and 135 with a nonfasting blood test, though do not have a diagnosis of diabetes. I suffer greatly with my feet and been told by a podiatrist that it is neuropathy. Is it possible that my high glucose levels are causing the neuropathy? Dear Terry, Thanks for your question. I like to think of blood glucose values as a spectrum of numbers with no clear cutoff between nondiabetic and diabetic. In similar manner there is a gray area of blood glucose that defines pre-diabetes. Many people use blood sugar and blood glucose interchangeably. The definition of diabetes has changed over time. The numbers you quote might very well be considered diagnostic of diabetes today whereas they were not 20 years ago. In 1997, the American Diabetes Association definition of normal blood glucose decreased from 120 to 110 mg/dL (6.1 mmol/L). In 2002, the American Diabetes Association defined a normal fasting blood glucose as less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Today we consider fasting blood sugars of 100 mg/dl to 125mg/dl to be in the realm of glucose intolerance which is sometimes called pre-diabetes. These patients are at increased risk for developing frank diabetes. Several fasting glucose levels over 125 or a single random glucose over 200 mg are considered diagnostic of diabetes. There are other tests used to make the diagnosis of pre-diabetes or diabetes. Pre-diabetes is defined as a blood sugar of 140 to 199 mg/dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol/L) two-hour after drinking 75 grams of an oral glucose solution. The diagnosis of diabetes is confirmed with a blood sugar of 200 mg/dL or greater, two hours after ingestion of the glucose solution. Hemoglobin A1C is a blood test that gives an estimate of blood sugar levels over the previous three months. Persons with Continue reading >>

Was The Fasting Sugar Limit Of Diabetes Lowered To 100 In 2003? If Yes, Why?

Was The Fasting Sugar Limit Of Diabetes Lowered To 100 In 2003? If Yes, Why?

The American Diabetic Association has got it totally wrong. if you were to follow their recommendations, a prediabetic would be regarded a full blown diabetic and a diabetic would be one with an advanced stage of the disease with multiple health complications. I do not want to get on to the ugly side of big pharma money on this but I wish to share some facts that would make people stop and take notice. To quote from anh-usa.org, “The main screening for diabetes is one’s fasting blood sugar levels, that is, glucose levels upon awakening, before breakfast. An optimally functioning metabolism will have fasting glucose levels of no more than 85 mg/dl, though the standard laboratory references call a reading of up to 99 “normal,” which is really too high. Also, blood sugar levels after meals should never spike more than 35 or 40 points above one’s fasting level, and should return to near-fasting level within two hours of eating. The problem is, as one’s blood sugar starts to go awry, after-meal blood sugars can swing into the diabetic range at the two-hour mark. But because doctors typically only measure the fasting glucose, they don’t see this and miss the opportunity for early diagnosis and a higher likelihood of reversal. Blood sugars can swing this way for years before the fasting levels rise to the diabetic range, and at that point, the person usually has some diabetes-related complications. Consumers are receiving false information in two critical ways: the unconscionable ADA misinformation, and conventional physicians telling them they are not diabetic and don’t need to worry, because their fasting glucose is “normal” based solely on fasting glucose tests—when in fact they may be in the beginning stages of diabetes and fully able to reverse it, w Continue reading >>

Diagnosis And Classification Of Diabetes Mellitus: New Criteria

Diagnosis And Classification Of Diabetes Mellitus: New Criteria

New recommendations for the classification and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus include the preferred use of the terms “type 1” and “type 2” instead of “IDDM” and “NIDDM” to designate the two major types of diabetes mellitus; simplification of the diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus to two abnormal fasting plasma determinations; and a lower cutoff for fasting plasma glucose (126 mg per dL [7 mmol per L] or higher) to confirm the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. These changes provide an easier and more reliable means of diagnosing persons at risk of complications from hyperglycemia. Currently, only one half of the people who have diabetes mellitus have been diagnosed. Screening for diabetes mellitus should begin at 45 years of age and should be repeated every three years in persons without risk factors, and should begin earlier and be repeated more often in those with risk factors. Risk factors include obesity, first-degree relatives with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia or previous evidence of impaired glucose homeostasis. Earlier detection of diabetes mellitus may lead to tighter control of blood glucose levels and a reduction in the severity of complications associated with this disease. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders with one common manifestation: hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia causes damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart and blood vessels. The etiology and pathophysiology leading to the hyperglycemia, however, are markedly different among patients with diabetes mellitus, dictating different prevention strategies, diagnostic screening methods and treatments. The adverse impact of hyperglycemia and the rationale for aggressive treatment have recently been reviewed.1 In June 1997, an international Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Worldwide According To The New Classification And Criteria

Type 2 Diabetes Worldwide According To The New Classification And Criteria

Paul Z. Zimmet, MD, PHD, FRACP Daniel McCarty, PHD Maximilian de Courten, MD Two major reports have recently revised the classification of and diagnostic criteria for diabetes. Classification was previously based on the need for insulin (insulin-dependent or non–insulin-dependent), but this has become increasingly confusing. Now, the type of diabetes is determined by the etiological process rather than the treatment modality. Type 1 diabetes is thus characterized by islet cell destruction and type 2 diabetes by a combination of defects in insulin secretion and action. An individual with either type of diabetes may be on any treatment modality. This classification should prove to be more logical and, for example, allow latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, which typically does not require insulin at presentation, to be classified as type 1 diabetes. The fasting plasma glucose diagnostic threshold for diabetes has been lowered to 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl), and impaired fasting glucose (fasting plasma glucose 6.1–6.9 mmol/l [110–125 mg/dl]) has been introduced as a new category of intermediate glucose metabolism. These changes recognize that the old fasting threshold did not match the 2-h (postload) threshold well and that both micro- and macrovascular disease develop at lower fasting glucose levels than previously recognized. Although the prevalences of diabetes according to the new fasting and 2-h criteria are now similar in most populations, the actual individuals identified as having diabetes are often different. Over 30% of all those with diabetes have a nondiabetic fasting glucose but still have increased cardiovascular mortality. Thus, it is important to retain the oral glucose tolerance test for the diagnosis of diabetes. CHANGES IN CLASSIFICATION — In 1979 an Continue reading >>

Doctors Are Conspiring To Convince You You’re Sick!

Doctors Are Conspiring To Convince You You’re Sick!

How do doctors decide what is healthy and unhealthy? Do they arbitrarily decide on risk factors to line their pockets – creating false epidemics as Sandy Szwarc at Junkfood Science suggests? Or, is there actually a science, called epidemiology, that is the basis for health recommendations? As I’ve said repeatedly, one of the sure signs you’re about to hear total BS is if someone suggests there is some conspiracy by scientists or doctors to hide the truth. In an article challenging the use of serum troponin levels to determine whether myocardial infarction (MI) has occurred (a more sensitive method) Sandy suggests this is yet another example of doctors lowering metrics of illness and risk to generate the impression of false epidemics. There must be a health crisis to bring the greatest funding for research, treatments and education… even if an epidemic has to be created. One of the most common tactics is to change the definition. When diagnostic criteria is broadened, suddenly, with the stroke of a pen, new cases can appear to explode in number. With heart disease deaths dropping dramatically for the past half century, the world’s top four organizations representing heart disease interests have all gotten together to change the definition … of a heart attack. The World Heart Federation, American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology have been championing the new criteria over recent years, and will officially release it next month in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and in the AHA journal, Circulation. The new definition will use elevations of troponin levels, rather than the traditional cardiac biomarkers, such as the MB-CK enzyme. This is a truly bizarre argument. Because measuring troponin Continue reading >>

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