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10 Things You Need To Know About Fruits And Vegetables

10 Things You Need To Know About Fruits And Vegetables

Which fruits and vegetables are best for your diabetes diet and why? While the answer will vary somewhat based on your individual needs, there are a few rules to remember when planning your menu. In general, most people with diabetes are encouraged to eat plenty of vegetables and use the plate method to dictate their intake of protein, carbohydrates and veggies. Your health care team can provide feedback to help guide you in planning your meals. Leafy greens and vegetables like mushrooms, beets and carrots offer a variety of nutrients and won’t spike your carbohydrate intake. Focus on these veggies over other, more carbohydrate-rich choices, such as parsnips, green peas and winter squash. Vegetables rich in soluble forms of plant fibre may help to lessen blood sugar swings by slowing down how quickly food is digested and delaying the absorption of sugar into the blood. Steaming is healthier than boiling or frying, since it allows vegetables to retain most of their nutrients. Steaming can take a fraction of the time of boiling, and steamers can be purchased at kitchenware stores for as little as $10. Fruits offer important nutrients, and are a delicious and healthy treat. Nonetheless, fruit is carbohydrate-rich and must be consumed in moderate quantities. Some fruits are better choices for people with diabetes. For example, two cups of strawberries can be ideal, since they have less sugar than a whole mango. Regardless of which fruit you choose, opt for raw whole fruit over common alternatives such as fruit canned in sugar syrups or packaged fruit snacks. Sweet potatoes are a starchy food that offers a healthier alternative to white potatoes. They rank lower on the glycemic index, with a lower spike in blood sugar levels. Colourful fruits and veggies like carrots, pepp Continue reading >>

Are Beets Good For Diabetes?

Are Beets Good For Diabetes?

Use of the word "superfood" has grown in recent years. Many a vegetable has been given this title, often despite little evidence for the health benefits claimed for such foods. Could the humble beet qualify as a superfood? If the potential health benefits identified in a number of studies are confirmed in further research, the answer could be yes. Contents of this article: What are beets? Beets, also called beetroot, table beet, garden beet, and red beet, are one of several varieties of Beta vulgaris. Beets are grown for their edible root and leaves. Other cultivated varieties include the sugar beet, which has white flesh, and a leafy vegetable called chard. Beets are most often deep red in color. It is possible to obtain golden, white, and stripy red and white versions of the vegetable, however. They have been cultivated since the beginning of recorded history and were often used for medicinal purposes as well as for food. Medicinal uses included treating fevers, constipation, and skin complaints. The vegetable was also commonly used by the Romans as an aphrodisiac. Are beets good for people with diabetes? Lowering blood pressure Research has suggested that eating beets, or drinking beet juice, may benefit people with high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a common condition among people with diabetes, and particularly those with type 2 diabetes. The blood pressure-lowering effect is thought to be caused by the presence of nitrates in beet juice. These nitrates improve the ability of blood vessels to widen, improving blood flow. In a recent study published in the journal Hypertension, researchers found that drinking a cup of beet juice each day was associated with a significant fall in blood pressure among people with high blood pressure levels. The study involved Continue reading >>

Eating During Pregnancy: What Every Pregnant Woman And Her Partner Should Know

Eating During Pregnancy: What Every Pregnant Woman And Her Partner Should Know

Eating During Pregnancy: What Every Pregnant Woman And Her Partner Should Know First, let me say that there is no such thing as eating for two. I know this is a huge disappointment, as many people out there would love to use their pregnancy as an opportunity to eat every single thing that they ever thought tasted good (I know, Ive been there). But let me fast forward through your pregnancy a bitits unhealthy for you, its unhealthy for your baby, and the pregnancy weight is not going to magically fall off (unless you were the kind of person who would not gorge out in the first place). As you begin your pregnancy, I wanted to share some key things to remember: You only need about 300 extra calories a day during pregnancy to support your babys growth and development. Most doctors suggest women gain a total of 1 to 4 pounds total during the first 3 months of their pregnancy. Women who gain too much are more likely to have a large baby or a premature baby. A premature baby is born too early, before 37 weeks of pregnancy. These mothersmay also have health conditions, like diabetes and high blood pressure that can cause problems during pregnancy. Here are some tipsto help you create better eating habits: Watch how much juice you drink. Even all-natural and 100% juice is full of sugar and empty calories. If you find it impossible to cut out these sweet drinks, treat yourself to a small glass once a day. If you are gestational diabetic, you should really cut these out from your diet all together. Anything canned or frozen is full of salt. Theres no getting around it. Even if its a healthy meal, its still full of salt. Try snacking on something healthy every 2 hours or so. If you can pick the food up in a drive-through, its probably unhealthy. The total amount of weight you shou Continue reading >>

Eating For Gestational Diabetes

Eating For Gestational Diabetes

If you have gestational diabetes, you may need to measure your blood sugar levels. If you have been diagnosed with insulin resistance or gestational diabetes , your healthcare provider or dietitian will teach you how to manage your condition. You will be asked to eat differently and monitor your blood sugars during your pregnancy, the goal being to keep your blood glucose within a normal range so that you don't gain too much weight. This will also help to keep your baby from having additional problems during and after birth. Your OB provider might be concerned that your baby will grow to be larger than average and high blood sugars can make both you and your baby sick. When you are eating for gestational diabetes, you need to eat less sugar and fewer starchy carbohydrates. Sugar, rice, pasta, and starchy vegetables such as corn, potatoes, beets, and peas can all cause your blood sugar to go higher than normal. Most of us love these foods, but they can make your blood sugar spike and then drop quickly afterwards -- making you want to eat more. This causes erratic blood sugar levels. Also, the starchy carbohydrates can make it easier for you to gain weight. In order to manage your blood sugar levels with gestational diabetes, you can follow some basic rules : Eat three meals and three snacks daily. Space snacks so that there is no more than three hours without eating. Eat a late afternoon snack and a bedtime snack that includes some protein. This will help you sleep and to keep your blood sugar more normal during the night. Choose protein to eat with any carbohydrates you eat. Foods with high sugar content , carbohydrates, or juices can adversely affect your blood sugar levels. Avoid adding sugar (white sugar, brown sugar, or honey) to foods. Avoid soda pop, lemonade, an Continue reading >>

Could Beetroot Juice Be Used To Treat Fetal Growth Restriction?

Could Beetroot Juice Be Used To Treat Fetal Growth Restriction?

Could beetroot juice be used to treat fetal growth restriction? Could beetroot juice be used to treat fetal growth restriction? Could beetroot juice be used to treat fetal growth restriction? Dr Elizabeth Cottrell, Dr Teresa Tropea, Professor Colin Sibley, Dr Susan Greenwood, Dr Mark Wareing, Catherine Chmiel, Dr Laura Ormesher, Dr Ed Johnstone, Dr Jenny Myers Supplementation with dietary nitrate can improve heart and blood vessel function, enhance exercise performance and increase blood flow. We've found that this could also treat fetal growth restriction. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is when a babys growth in the womb slows or stops, and affects around 5% of all pregnancies. Often when this happens, there isnt enough blood flowing across the placenta: this means the baby cant get the food and oxygen it needs to grow. Currently, there is no treatment for FGR: early delivery is the only option. Funded by the British Heart Foundation and Central Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, researchers at the Tommys London centre are trying to change this. Nitric oxide is a small molecule made throughout the body that makes our blood vessels get wider, allowing blood to flow more easily. It is particularly important in making sure enough blood flows across the placenta during pregnancy. Too little nitric oxide has been associated with decreased blood flow in pregnancies where the baby isnt growing normally. Recently, scientists have shown that nitrate which we eat plenty of in green leafy vegetables and beetroot can be activated in the body to increase levels of nitric oxide. Studies in non-pregnant humans and animals have shown that supplementing the diet with nitrate can improve heart and blood vessel function, lead to better exercise performance and increase blood flow. We have Continue reading >>

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes

Foods You Can Eat With Gestational Diabetes A health-care professional for more than 10 years, Rica Lewis has obtained numerous certifications in the industry. In 2006 she began channeling her knowledge into health-related articles for print and online publications. Her work has appeared in "Metroparent Magazine," "Anew Heart Healthcare Magazine" and community newspapers. Lewis earned a diploma from LongRidge Writers Institute. Special meal planning for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects pregnant women whose blood sugar levels are elevated during pregnancy. Women who do not have diabetes outside of pregnancy can get gestational diabetes. Expecting mothers are typically tested as a routine part of medical care. The disease is thought to be caused by the placentas hormones blocking the action of the mothers insulin, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The goal of treatment is to keep blood glucose levels normal. Special meal planning in addition to blood glucose monitoring and insulin injections are all aspects of treatment. When planning meals, the ADA recommends women with gestational diabetes limit fat intake to 30 percent or less of daily calories. A healthy breakfast for women with gestational diabetes might begin with whole grain toast with sugar-free jelly, a teaspoon of butter or margarine, one egg and a side of fresh fruit. Lunch could include a leafy green salad with a variety of vegetables, topped with a vinegar and oil dressing or a light variety with low sugar. Lean meats like turkey or chicken are also great salad toppers and can provide a substantial source of protein. Soups can also be great lunch meals and can incorporate a host of vegetables. Packaged foods should be limited, as they are often higher in calories, carboh Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (pronounced jess-TAY-shun-ul die-uh-BEET-eez) is one of the most common health problems for pregnant women. It affects about 5 percent of all pregnancies, which means there are about 200,000 cases each year. If not treated, gestational diabetes can cause health problems for mother and fetus. The good news is that gestational diabetes can be treated, especially if it is found early in the pregnancy. There are some things that women with gestational diabetes can do to keep themselves well and their pregnancies healthy. Controlling gestational diabetes is the key to a healthy pregnancy. and can be achieved by following the Gestational Diabetes Treatment Plan. Gestational Diabetes is a kind of diabetes that only pregnant women get. In fact, the word gestational means “during pregnancy.” If a woman gets diabetes or high blood sugar when she is pregnant, it is gestational diabetes. Diabetes Diabetes means your blood sugar is too high. Diabetes is a disease of metabolism, which is the way your body uses food for energy and growth. Your stomach and intestines break down (or digest) much of the food you eat into a simple sugar called glucose (pronounced GLOO-kos). Glucose is your body’s main source of energy. After digestion, the glucose passes into your bloodstream, which is why glucose is also called blood sugar. Once in the blood, the glucose is ready for your body cells to use. However, your cells need insulin (pronounced IN-suh-lin), a hormone made by your body, to get the glucose. Insulin “opens” your cells so that glucose can get in. When your metabolism is normal, your body makes enough insulin to move all the glucose smoothly from your bloodstream into your cells. If you have diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin and your cells Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetic Diet

Gestational Diabetic Diet

Gestational diabetic diet is a bit of a misnomer. A healthy diet that everybody on this planet should follow, is all it is. There is no standard diet plan for the gestational diabetic. Each person is unique. Therefore, the diet plan must consider the weight, age, stage in pregnancy and personal preferences, individually. The overriding factor must be to provide proper nutrition to the mother and baby. The word diet has some connotations that must be clarified. Most people think diet is what you do when attempting to lose weight. Diet actually means the sum of the food consumed. More specifically, it means, the deliberate selection of food to control nutrient intake or body weight. It is not a good idea to diet for weight loss when pregnant. You should have done that before getting pregnant! Therefore, gestational diabetic diet refers to the deliberate selection of food to control nutrient intake. Your gestational diabetic diet should not be seen as a restricting exercise. Existing eating habits and personal preferences must also be taken into account. The gestational diabetic diet plan is merely a different pattern of eating. The focus must mainly be on healthy, nutritious food combinations. The need that the gestational diabetic diet must address is to slow down the body's glycemic response. Low glycemic carbohydrates enter the bloodstream slowly, helping to maintain stable blood sugar levels. Assist your body to metabolize sugar effectively, by eating small meals every 3 - 4 hours. This also ensures that the stomach is not empty for long periods during the day. Low glycemic carbohydrates will ensure a sustainable energy level, and continually provide nutrients for the baby. To maintain stable glucose levels during the night, consume some protein rich food at bedtime. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Making lifestyle changes to follow a good gestational diabetes diet will mean achieving lower blood sugar levels which will ultimately benefit your baby hugely and reduce the risks and complications associated with gestational diabetes. But what is a good gestational diabetes diet? Our golden rules to eating The best approach to food we have found is to stick to these 8 golden rules: Eat little & often, ideally 3 meals and 3 snacks a day 'Pair' foods so that they will be tolerated better, "food pairing" is a term that we use in relation to the GD diet Eat high protein Eat good, natural fats Eat low amounts of unrefined complex starchy carbohydrates at every meal Bulk up meals with lots of vegetables & salad Drink plenty of water Go for a stroll We explain all these points in more detail below... #1. Eat little and often Ideally we want blood sugar levels which look (if we were to draw a picture) like rolling hills, rather than huge spikes and crashes. The best way to achieve good control over levels is to choose sensible foods and to eat little amounts often. We advise aiming for 3 meals and 3 snacks a day. Avoiding to eat is something that many mothers do when they are first diagnosed with gestational diabetes as they are unsure or too scared over what to eat. This can actually have a detrimental effect on blood sugar levels. If a meal or snack is missed then blood sugar levels can drop low and when this happens the liver dumps glucose into the bloodstream to give us energy and keep us going. The glucose can raise our levels high and then when eating our next meal, as levels are higher than they should be, they raise even higher. Following a big spike in levels, the body will signal the pancreas to produce insulin, but with gestational diabetes we may not be able to pr Continue reading >>

These Juices Will Keep You Healthy During Pregnancy

These Juices Will Keep You Healthy During Pregnancy

These Juices will keep you healthy during Pregnancy These Juices will keep you healthy during Pregnancy Once you get pregnant, youre not just eating for yourself anymore. You need vitamins, minerals, and nutrients to support the growth of a whole new human being! But consuming enough healthy foods can be difficult for a pregnant women, especially if youre experiencing severe morning sickness. Most pregnant women take supplements, but they cannot replace fresh fruits and vegetables. An easy way to keep you and baby healthy is juicing. Below are the best pregnancy juices and how they help meet your bodys needs during each pregnancy trimester, which comes with its own needs and challenges. Here are the Top 5 Juicers we recommend for Pregnancy Juicing RECOMMENDED: What are the best fruits to eat during pregnancy ? Find out here. The first pregnancy trimester is marked by fatigue, nausea and vomiting, and lack of energy. It is vital that pregnant women consume folate to prevent birth defects, along with calcium and vitamins C, A, and E. The second pregnancy trimester is often the easiest, but it can be accompanied by heartburn. Consuming iron-rich foods as well as lots of calcium help with that and the embryos development. If you develop gestational diabetes during this trimester, cut down on your sugar and carbohydrate intake. The third pregnancy trimester is a time to help the baby grow and reduce the risk of complications. Consume iron, calcium, and vitamins D, E, C, and A during this time period. Beetroot juice has tons of health benefits for pregnant women. However, keep your daily consumption between or a beetroot. If you feel the juice is too strong, mix it with carrot juice and/or water. Experts recommend letting beetroot juice sit for at least 2 hours before drinki Continue reading >>

Beets: Sweet, Nutritious And Diabetic-friendly?

Beets: Sweet, Nutritious And Diabetic-friendly?

Beets are a great nutrient-rich vegetable with low calorie content despite their sweet taste. They are an excellent source of folate, a B vitamin that is heart-healthy and, because of its role in producing and repairing DNA, seems to be part of our anti-cancer arsenal, too. The red color comes from compounds called betalains, which laboratory studies suggest could be both heart- and cancer-protective. In animal studies, beets seem to inhibit carcinogen formation and increase production of immune cells and body enzymes that help fight cancer development. Nutritionally, beets are a diabetic-friendly food choice. One beet (82g) provides only 35 calories, zero fat and 8 grams of carbohydrate, along with 2 grams of dietary fiber and 6 grams of sugars. Whether cooked, canned or raw, beets provide an array of nutrients, including potassium (267 mg) and vitamin C (4 mg). Gently home-cooked beets maintain much of the nutrition, and raw beets preserve even more of the heat-sensitive nutrients. Try them peeled and grated raw into salads for an added burst of color. Cooking beets is easy: leave about one inch of stem intact to minimize color loss while cooking, and roast them in the oven on their own or mixed with other vegetables, or steam them lightly. For best nutrient content, don't overcook: keep roasting to 45 to 60 minutes and steaming to 15 minutes or less. Pop them out of their skin after cooking, perhaps wearing rubber gloves to avoid temporarily pink-colored fingers. Golden beets are less common, and though without the red betalain compounds, they provide lutein, a healthful carotenoid compound. Here are some beet recipes to try. Roasted Beet and Carrot Salad Yield: 4 servings. Serving size: 1-1/2 cups (375 mL). Source: The Heart-Smart Diabetes Kitchen: Fresh, Fast and F Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

Beets And Diabetes Type 2

Beets And Diabetes Type 2

When you are a diabetic, you have to be especially careful about your diet. While most vegetables are good for diabetics and are always a part of a healthy diabetes diet plan, certain root vegetables that are high in natural sugars can get left off the diet list for fear that they may cause a spike in blood sugar levels. Beetroot is a classic example of this. In fact, most people don’t know that beets and diabetes make a good combination! High in folate, vitamin C and alpha-lipoic acid , beets can be extremely beneficial for diabetics who suffer from nerve damage. According to Society for Biomedical Diabetes Research, alpha-lipoic acid seems to delay or reverse peripheral diabetic neuropathy through its multiple antioxidant properties. Studies have shown that drinking beet juice can heal nerve damage and treat both pain and numbness of hands and feet in diabetics. RELATED: 8 Top Research-Backed Diabetes Superfoods Beets And Diabetes: Why Is It Good For You? Beets are high in fiber, potassium, nitrate content, folate, and metabolites. While their glycemic index is 64, the natural sugars in beetroot don’t readily covert into glucose too quickly, so it doesn’t cause a spike in blood glucose levels. In fact, beetroot juice high in dietary nitrate improves cognitive function in diabetics when consumed consecutively for 14 days. In a study done by NIHR Exeter Clinical Research Facility and Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical School to study the effect of dietary nitrate on blood pressure, endothelial function, and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes, it was reported that dietary nitrate rich beetroot juice used for clinical trials improved cognitive function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Beets are exceptionally good Continue reading >>

Advice: Failed 1 Hr Glucose

Advice: Failed 1 Hr Glucose

Rough morning. I know gestational diabetes has nothing to do with activity level or diet necessarily...I'm a nurse so wrapping my mind around this is really hard! Im 27 weeks and still running 3.5miles a day 5 days a week. I don't eat horribly either. I failed my 1 hr glucose test horribly at 185. We did go out to dinner the night before at Shoguns to celebrate a friend's bday. I stayed away from the rice and noodles and just ate veggies and shrimp. I ate more than usual for dinner and still felt full the next morning before my 9am test. My doc doesn't require fasting so I had 2 hard boiled eggs and black coffee before the test just so I wouldn't get nauseated. I don't necessarily think dinner or breakfast messed up my results but basically I just want to know if anyone else has failed miserably and passed the 3 hr?!? It just seems so unfair...I know, I'm having a major pity party this morning ;) Also, what do I expect for the 3 hour?!? Another sugary drink?!? I don't have any insight or advice, but I also just got word that I failed my 1 hour test. Not by much, but still a little high for their liking. Like you, I am still actively exercising and eating a healthy diet. So depressed that I have to go back for the 3-hour test and choke down another sugary drink! The nurse who called and gave me the news said that she would be sending me a letter in the mail with a suggested diet for 3 days before the test, as well as some other info. Ugh! What a pain! I wish you the best! I failed 1hr test , it was just height slightly , but I was told I have to take the 3hours test, which failed , it was hight by 5 point. Just like you I usually run 3 to 5 miles a day. I guess it all comes down to how your body process hight sugar foods (carbs) . It's not so bad, ones you get use to ea Continue reading >>

Is Beetroot Good For Diabetics?

Is Beetroot Good For Diabetics?

If you or your loved one is suffering from diabetes, it is always important to be very cautious about what you eat. While many are wary about certain vegetables that are high on the glycemic index for the sheer fear of a rise in blood sugar, some of the nutritious vegetables also go off the diet list for the same reason. One such vegetable is beetroot. Here are 11 amazing benefits of beetroots. Since this vegetable is high in natural sugar content, many people stay away from consumption of beetroots if they suffer from diabetes. However, this vegetable is more beneficial to them for more than one reason. Here is why: Apart from having natural sugar they are also high in fibre, potassium and folate that are good for every individual including a diabetic. They have a glycemic score of 64 which isn’t too low, but when consumed the natural sugars don’t get converted into glucose too quickly. A study published in the journal Nitric Oxide Society pointed out that since beetroots are high in nitrate content, they also help to improve cognitive function in diabetic patients if consumed for a fortnight at a stretch [1]. Also, beetroot juice is a rich source of betalain and neo betanin, two nutrients that help to lower glucose levels, increase insulin sensitivity and prevent oxidative stress-induced changes in patients with diabetes [2]. Here are six other ways in which beetroot juice can save your life. The best way to have it Studies indicate that beetroots give the best benefits to diabetics when had in the form of juice [1]. However, prefer to have it in the morning so it can convert into glucose slowly and steadily and provide you with the required energy throughout the day. Here are a list of foods that can help fight diabetes better. If you don’t wish to have the jui Continue reading >>

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