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Bedtime Drinks For Diabetics

Bedtime Drinks? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Bedtime Drinks? | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member I used to have a sugary hot chocolate at bedtime in the winter and a flavoured milkshake in the summer. I immediately changed my hot chocolate to a diet version which is only 4g carbs per mug. I've been trying to find a low carb milkshake alternative now for this hotter weather, and I keep arriving at expensive Atkins low carb, high protein shakes. Would these be ok for me or does anyone have a quick easy recipe for a low carb chocolate milkshake? I used to have a sugary hot chocolate at bedtime in the winter and a flavoured milkshake in the summer. I immediately changed my hot chocolate to a diet version which is only 4g carbs per mug. I've been trying to find a low carb milkshake alternative now for this hotter weather, and I keep arriving at expensive Atkins low carb, high protein shakes. Would these be ok for me or does anyone have a quick easy recipe for a low carb chocolate milkshake? Not before bed, but I sometimes enjoy Crusha NAS milkshake mix in Lactofree milk. Lactofree (Whole) is 2.8g carbs per 100ml. Couldn't you use coconut milk for a low carb milkshake? Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member Not before bed, but I sometimes enjoy Crusha NAS milkshake mix in Lactofree milk. Lactofree (Whole) is 2.8g carbs per 100ml. Thank you for your suggestion, I had visions of mixing cream and water and cocoa powder half asleep at bedtime! This sounds much simpler! Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member Couldn't you use coconut milk for a low carb milkshake? Not very keen on coconut, but a different nut milk perhaps? Almond? Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member Ha ha! Thanks f Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

A1c Tip: What You Eat…before Bedtime!

A1c Tip: What You Eat…before Bedtime!

Unfortunately, the time of day when many people (whether or not they have diabetes) want to veg-out and eat some kind of junk food is at the very end of the day. There’s no mystery: it’s comforting to sit down with something delicious and perhaps less-than-ideal for a person with diabetes after long day at work. As the days get shorter and winter approaches, that urge can only grow stronger. But how is it affecting your overnight blood sugars and your blood sugar the next morning? Personally, I’ve found that when I have a really indulgent treat, like a slice of gluten-free blueberry pie, for example–something really high in both carbs and fat–that even if I manage my blood sugar tightly before bed and am “in-range” throughout the night, I actually see my blood sugar rise between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. the next morning! Normally, my blood sugar is extremely steady during the morning hours, but what I ate before bed can impact my blood sugar nearly 12 hours later. What are you eating before bed? How is it affecting your blood sugars not only through the night but the next day, too? What You Eat Before Bed: Things to Consider Here are just a few of things to consider if you think this particular time of day may be impacting your blood sugar levels and thus impacting your A1C goals, too: One of the biggest reasons people tend to over-eat at night is because they didn’t get enough food in during the day. Take a closer look at what you’re eating throughout the day: hardly anything? Are you starving by the time you get home? If you are struggling with your blood sugar throughout the night, or you’re simply waking up at 5 a.m. to find that you’ve been well above 200 mg/dL all night long, think about what proportion of the day that means your blood sugar was hig Continue reading >>

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Low blood sugar during the night can be a concern for people with diabetes, especially those on insulin. A 2003 study published in "Diabetes Care" investigated the impact of snack composition on nightly blood sugars in adults with Type 1 diabetes. The researchers concluded that bedtime snacks consisting of a carbohydrate and protein worked best in preventing low blood sugars when the bedtime blood sugar was less than 126 mg/dL. Video of the Day Most bedtime snacks contain about 15 to 30 g of carbohydrate, or two servings of a carbohydrate-containing food, and a serving of protein. It is not quite understood why protein helps to prevent nightly hypoglycemia, according to the authors of the "Diabetes Care" study, but it is believed to be related to the way protein is metabolized. Cereal and milk provides both carbohydrate and protein. A good bedtime snack consists of 3/4-cup serving of whole-grain cereal and 1-cup of low-fat milk. During cold months, you can try 1/2 cup of hot cereal with 2 tbsp. of raisins and 1 cup of skim milk as a cereal bedtime snack. Crackers and Peanut Butter Crackers provide the carbohydrate and peanut butter provides the protein. Spread 12 whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter or you can also try six whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter and 1-cup of skim milk. Each of these snacks contain 30 g of carbohydrate. Sandwiches also make a good bedtime snack for diabetics. Choose lean sources of meat to decrease your intake of saturated fat. Too much saturated fat in the diet increases blood cholesterol levels, another risk factor for heart disease. Bedtime sandwich ideas include two slices of whole wheat bread with 1 oz. of turkey, 1 oz. of lean ham, 1oz. of low-fat cheese or 1 oz. of canned tuna packed in water mixed with 1 ts Continue reading >>

Have Diabetes? Can’t Sleep? Don’t Eat These Tonight

Have Diabetes? Can’t Sleep? Don’t Eat These Tonight

There is a lot of evidence that sleeping well improves diabetes control, so anything that will help us sleep better catches my interest. I am also drawn to ideas that make life easier with Type 2 diabetes, especially when they involve food. You may know about tryptophan, the amino acid that has the ability to increase melatonin at night, which can improve our sleep. But I have learned that there are also things we should not eat in the hours before bedtime. Some make it harder to fall asleep, while others might affect the quality or duration of our sleep. Here is a partial list and the reasons why you may want to avoid these foods in the evening. You have a unique metabolism, so not all of them will necessarily affect you. However, reading this list may give you insight into why it is hard to get to sleep sometimes. Did you know that cured meats can keep you awake? They contain tyramine, a substance in various foods that leads to a boost in brain activity, which delays sleep. Tyramine is also found in aged cheese and fermented foods. This means a submarine sandwich with salami and Swiss cheese is not a good nighttime snack. Of course, any heavy meal takes longer to digest. That is why it is better to wait at least three or four hours before trying to sleep after eating something like that. Meats like steak and roast, which contain a lot of protein, spend a long time in your digestive system, so it is better to eat them earlier in the day, giving you more time to digest them before you lie down. Fried foods and other items high in fat are also digested slowly. It can be hard to stay asleep after a heavy meal, and aging with diabetes often means your digestion has slowed down. It may be easier on you to have the foods mentioned above for lunch instead of supper. Highly sp Continue reading >>

9 Ways To Sleep Better When You Have Diabetes

9 Ways To Sleep Better When You Have Diabetes

Shutterstock How Sleep Affects Type 2 Diabetes Everyone needs good sleep, but it’s particularly important when you have type 2 diabetes. “Getting inadequate amounts of sleep can negatively impact blood sugar levels short and long term,” says Gregg Faiman, MD, an endocrinologist at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland. In fact, sleep is as essential to your health as nutrition and exercise, he says. Too little sleep puts stress on your body, causing it to release hormones like cortisol. “Cortisol reduces insulin resistance and increases blood sugar levels,” Dr. Faiman says. Here’s how to get good sleep with type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

Many people have childhood memories of parents urging them to drink lots of milk. When you’re a child, you typically have to drink whatever milk your parents provided for you. It may have been a more traditional option such as whole milk or a sweet alternative such as almond milk. Now that you’re the one doing the choosing, you can pick the best type of milk for you. If you have diabetes, you should know that not all types of milk are beneficial for you. Although you need the nutritious calcium and protein found in milk, it’s important to note the saturated fats, carbohydrates, and sugar levels in each. This information will help you pick the best milk for your dietary needs. People with diabetes are not able to make, or use, insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar. When insulin isn’t doing its job efficiently, blood sugar levels can spike. There are two kinds of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. No matter which type you have, managing your sugar intake is important. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, which is why carb counting is often recommended for people with diabetes. People with diabetes may also have high cholesterol or triglycerides in their blood. Triglycerides are a type of fat, which can increase the risk for a heart attack. Keeping an eye on the saturated and trans fat content in your diet is important. Diabetes can also make some people more susceptible to bone fractures. A diet high in calcium can help keep bones strong. One way to do this is by drinking milk daily. Adding calcium-rich milk into your diet may take a bit of planning. Creating a meal plan specifically designed for people with diabetes can be a good place to start. The American Diabetes Association recommends several meal plans geared toward keeping blood s Continue reading >>

Eating For Better Sleep

Eating For Better Sleep

Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise. Easy for Ben Franklin to say. According to the CDC, more than a third of Americans dont get enough sleep on a regular basis , let alone get to bed early. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society recommend that adults get at least 7 hours of sleep every night for optimal health and well-being. Yet getting sufficient sleep, along with quality sleep, continues to elude many of us. Not getting enough sleep is certainly a nuisance. It leaves us feeling groggy, grumpy, and unfocused the next morning, making it hard to concentrate at work or school. And while poor performance at our jobs is nothing to take lightly, the reality is that there are serious health consequences from insufficient sleep. A higher risk of Type 2 diabetes , high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and obesity is linked to a lack of sleep. In addition, shortchanging yourself on sleep can affect your immune system, making you more susceptible to the flu, colds, and other infections. Just last month, a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association revealed that people who had diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or obesity had double the chances of dying from heart disease or stroke compared to people without these risk factors if they got less than six hours of sleep each day. Having diabetes is already a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. Gloomy news aside, there are steps you can take to help you sleep better. Many of these are related to lifestyle measures, and include : Setting up a sleep schedule and staying with it. This means going to bed and getting up at about the same times each day. Exercising regularly (but not too close to bedtime). Keeping your bedroom Continue reading >>

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Drinking Alcohol Safely With Diabetes

Alcohol. Yep, some people with diabetes drink it. I do, on occasion. Some argue that drinking alcohol with diabetes isnt the healthiest choice, but I could say the same thing about diet soda. Whatever your stance on it is, it is something that should be handled with care, especially when you are dealing with diabetes. As anyone with diabetes (or someone who loves a PWD) knows, it is a balancing act. Between food, exercise, hormones and the like, we are constantly chasing that elusive 100 mg/dl on the meter. Alcohol can really throw your blood sugars into a tailspin. Lets not even start on carbohydrates in your drink. Your liver and its functions are a very big player in how you manage diabetes while drinking. Instead of helping to regulate your blood sugar, your liver is busy metabolizing the alcohol, which can result in some scary lows. Be prepared with glucose tabs and make sure to check regularly if you are having a drink. I like to stick to drinks that dont have carbohydrates in them: a good red wine, vodka and club soda or Fresca, or an occasional martini are predictable for me. Plus, I dont have to take any insulin with them which makes it easier. If I am having a beer or something fruity like rum punch, I make sure to limit how much I am having. I once had an endocrinologist tell me that after every 3 drinks make your fourth one with carbs. I dont know how good that advice was, I dont follow it But I do stick to what I know, I test very often, and I make sure to eat something while I am drinking. Yes, you should be cautious before bed even when not drinking but you need to be even more on track of what your blood sugar is when you are. I cannot stress enough to test right before bed (and before you brush your teeth) to make sure you are in a healthy range. I usu Continue reading >>

20 Comforting & Delicious Low Carb Hot Drink Recipes

20 Comforting & Delicious Low Carb Hot Drink Recipes

There’s nothing more comforting than coming in from a cold winter’s day and wrapping your hands around a hot mug full of something delicious. But most hot drinks aren’t exactly diabetes-friendly, filled with sugar and carbs as they are. Here are 20 delicious low carb hot drink recipes that will warm you down to your toes without sending your blood sugar into the stratosphere. Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Prevent Low Blood Sugar At Night

6 Ways To Prevent Low Blood Sugar At Night

Nighttime dips in blood sugar levels are common among people with diabetes. Authors of a study published in June 2013 in Quality of Life Research noted that people with diabetes — type 1 or type 2 — experience low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during sleep more frequently than many doctors realize. Nighttime hypoglycemia can be caused by a number of different factors, from exercising too close to bedtime to drinking alcohol in the evening. If untreated, low overnight blood sugar levels can lead to headaches and loss of sleep — and in extreme cases, seizures or even death. The good news is that preventing low blood sugar while you sleep can be achieved with a few simple steps: 1. Check Your Blood Sugar Before Bed “For everybody with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it’s absolutely critical that they check their blood sugar before going to bed to make sure they’re not going to have an episode of low blood sugar during the night,” says Helena W. Rodbard, MD, medical director of Endocrine and Metabolic Consultants, a private practice in Rockville, Maryland, and past president of the American College of Endocrinology. If your blood sugar levels are low at bedtime, eat a healthy snack before going to sleep. The size of the snack should be in proportion to the dip in blood sugar. For instance, a small drop in blood sugar requires only a small snack. If you use an insulin pump, consider temporarily reducing the active dose of insulin. 2. Know the Signs of Low Overnight Blood Sugar Symptoms of hypoglycemia usually develop when blood sugar levels drop below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl). They include shakiness, sweating, confusion, erratic behavior, headache, and lightheadedness. With nighttime hypoglycemia, you may wake up with these symptoms or with a higher blood su Continue reading >>

10 Low-carb Beverages To Drink When You Have Diabetes

10 Low-carb Beverages To Drink When You Have Diabetes

10 Low-Carb Beverages To Drink When You Have Diabetes Reviewed by Robert Hurd, MD on Aug 26, 2017 Just because you control your diabetes with a low-carb diet doesnt mean that you dont have lots of choices of great drinks. In fact, all of the treats here will fit your healthy lifestyle and still satisfy your taste buds. Water is so common that we take it for granted until we run out of it. Besides air, nothing is more necessary for life. But dont settle for unfiltered tap water or waste money on bottles of it. A home filter removes impurities and greatly improves the taste by taking out the chlorine. Keeping a bottle of water in the fridge or adding ice cubes can give it some variety. You can buy sparkling water at all the food stores, but you can make it sparkle at home without buying bottles or carting them home. For years Ive added fizz to my water and to my life with a Sodastream CO2 carbonator. Even better is enhancing its flavor with zero carb SweetLeaf Water Drops or by simply adding a slice of lemon. Is drinking coffee bad for people with diabetes? Or does it help? Hundreds of studies seem to show one extreme or the other. But many experts now say that drinking one to three cups to day is either neutral or helpful. If you like it white, instead of adding milk or half & half (too many carbs), you can switch to a milk alternative (see slide 9). Instead of sugar, you can use carb-free stevia. After water, more people drink tea than anything else. Im one of them (along with my morning coffee), and I prefer some of the black teas that dont need milk to bring out the flavor, especially those from the Assam and Darjeeling regions of India. Green tea from China with jasmine is another of my favorites. In fact, we have so many choices of tea that entire books are written Continue reading >>

How A Cup Of Hot Chocolate Before Bedtime Could Prevent Diabetes

How A Cup Of Hot Chocolate Before Bedtime Could Prevent Diabetes

How a cup of hot chocolate before bedtime could PREVENT diabetes Mice fed cocoa powder-rich diet had 30% lower levels of a fat in the blood Triglycerides cause fatty liver disease; are directly related to T2 diabetes Dark chocolate is rich in flavanols, plant chemicals that boost blood flow by widening vessels Forget everything you've been told about hot chocolate being an indulgence: a cup before bedtime could fend off diabetes, a study has found. Mice fed a high fat diet that causes type 2 diabetes - the obesity-related form of the condition - suffered less inflammation when given cocoa powder as well. Researchers believe their findings, published by the European Journal of Nutrition, may apply to humans. Dark chocolate is rich in flavanols, plant chemicals that boost blood flow by widening vessels. They have previously been linked to a host of health benefits. In the study the mice ate the human equivalent of 10 tablespoons of cocoa powder, about four or five cups of hot cocoa, during a ten week period. Professor Joshua Lambert said: 'What surprised me was the magnitude of the effect. There was not as big of an effect on the body weight as we expected, but I was surprised at the dramatic reduction of inflammation and fatty liver disease.' Several indicators of inflammation, which causes type 2 diabetes by prompting insulin resistance, were much lower in the mice fed the cocoa, and almost identical to a control group that just received low fat foods. For example, they had about 27 per cent less insulin in their plasma, high levels of which suggest a patient may have diabetes, than those on the high fat diet without the supplement. The cocoa powder also reduced amounts of harmful liver fats called triglycerides by about a third. Too much of these are a sign of fatty l Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

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