diabetestalk.net

Beating Type 1 Diabetes

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

12 Steps To Beat Diabetes Naturally

12 Steps To Beat Diabetes Naturally

12 Steps to Beat Diabetes Naturally: Diabetes is a modern day epidemic with the American Diabetes Association claiming 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) have diabetes and another 86 million people (18.8%) have insulin-resistant pre-diabetes (1). The vast majority of diabetes is the type II variety known as degenerative diabetes. Research has shown that degenerative diabetes is an inflammatory disorder and is completely preventable & reversible through an anti-inflammatory lifestyle. When we eat sugar or carbohydrates our digestive system converts these larger molecules into glucose which is then absorbed into the bloodstream and taken to every cell of the body. Blood sugar fuels the cells keeping them healthy. For healthy function it is critical to maintain stable blood sugar levels. In this article, you will discover 12 steps to beat diabetes naturally. Diabetes and Your Blood Sugar: Diabetes is classically diagnosed by one of three different mechanisms. Hemoglobin A1C (Hg A1C): This is a form of hemoglobin (Hg) or red blood cell that is measured to identify the average plasma glucose concentration over a 3 month period of time. When Hg is exposed to plasma glucose there is a glycation reaction that takes place. As blood sugar increases the fraction of glycated Hg increases. Healthy HgA1C levels are considered below 5.7 although most functional medicine doctors like to see them below 5.4. Hg A1C levels above 6.5 are clinically diagnosed as diabetes mellitus. From 5.7-6.5 it is considered pre-diabetic. Fasting Plasma Glucose Test (FPG): This test measures fasting morning blood sugar levels. The individual is instructed not to eat any food within 12 hours of the test. So the individual typically told to skip breakfast and the test is usually performed in th Continue reading >>

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Three Articles On Type I Diabetes: Article #1: Introduction to Type I Diabetes (This Article) Article #2: Possible Causes of Type I Diabetes Article #3: The Treatment of Type I Diabetes Introduction to Type I Diabetes Did you know that there are two products that have cured advanced Type I diabetes cases? Both of them will be discussed in this article. But more importantly, one of these products can reverse cumulative severe side-effects of Type I or Type 2 diabetes. Type I diabetes is actually a set of symptoms, meaning it can be caused by several different things. The symptoms are that the blood lacks insulin. There are actually several things that can cause an abnormally low level of insulin in the blood. Type I diabetes is a very severe disease. The average lifespan of Type I diabetic is 5-8 years shorter than an average person. But death is not the worst thing about Type I diabetes. Here is a list of some of the health problems it can lead to: Amputation of limbs Blindness (retinopathy) – diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in America — 12,000 to 24,000 case annually Kidney failure (nephropathy) – frequently leading to dialysis or a kidney/pancreas transplant Liver disease Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) Heart disease Stroke (e.g. paralysis) High blood pressure Nerve damage (neuropathy) Dementia Urinary tract infection (mostly in women) Depression – Note: Aspartame (e.g. Equal, NutraSweet, etc.) and sugar are the leading causes of depression in non-diabetics. However, because the average diabetic consumes more aspartame than the average person, it is highly possible that aspartame is by far the REAL cause of depression in diabetics!! A diabetic should absolutely avoid aspartame and all other artificial sweeteners! Bone quali Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes No Match For Primal Lifestyle!

Type 1 Diabetes No Match For Primal Lifestyle!

Type 1 Diabetes No Match for Primal Lifestyle! Its Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Marks Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Marks Daily Apple community please contact me here . Ill continue to publish these each Friday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading! My name is Shawn and I am 28 years old. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about a year ago. I havent seen many stories or articles related to diabetes on the MDA website so I thought I would share how going Primal has helped me take back control over my health and wellbeing. First of all, I have actually been very healthy most of my life (or so I thought). In college I lifted weights, ran, and did pushups and sit-ups in my dorm room on a regular basis. I despised salad and fresh veggies, and loaded up on Hamburger Helper, cereal, and PB&J because it was convenient and I worked it all off during my workouts. I am 6 tall and my weight maxed out at about 205 lbs (92 kgs) during my last year of college (2007)perfectly healthy I thought. Fast forward several years (during which I managed to drop about 10 lbs thanks to army basic training) to September of 2011. I started losing weightlots of weightabout 25 lbs in 3 weeks to be exact, I drank water by the gallons, and I could no longer exercise without getting severe cramping in my legs. Something was obviously wrong, so I made an appointment with my doctor who I hadnt seen in about 10 years. I had a fasting blood sugar level of 350 ( normal is 70-99 mg/dL ). The last several months of 2011 were very challenging. There was no explanation why I got this disease (no family history) and trying to come to terms with the fact that I would have to de Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs. Type 1 Diabetes

Paleo Vs. Type 1 Diabetes

I received the following email today, pretty cool stuff: I emailed you about a month or so ago. I just want to give you an update on my situation: Ive lost about 15-20lbs. Ive taken no insulin for 5 weeks and Im type 1 Diabetic!. Because of my strict paleo diet(gluten and dairy free)my a1c is not going to be much higher than when I was taking crap load of insulin. My glucose has really stabilized in the low 100s (100-125)and I havent had a lowat all during this time nor haveI had extreme highs like when Iwas taking so much insulin. My blood pressure has dropped tremendously and my Internist thinks that my pancreas has jumped started again, because even when I have had a cheat meal my blood is responding in a completely different manner. We are going to do a c-peptide test again. Ive also started toincorporate bettersleepingpatterns (trying to get 9-10 hours) and my fasting glucose iseven better (lower) than before. All that to say, I really appreciate your help andyour blog. Its been incredibly resourceful and much more helpful than even myendocrinologist. Best of luck in the future! Ill try tokeep you posted when the end results come. It is well understood that Type 1 Diabetes is a failure of the beta cells of the pancreas to produce insulin. This is generally acknowledged to be the result of an autoimmune response, usually attributed to a viral infection or some kind of trauma. What is less known is the role of grain lectins in this process. Many people benefit not only from reducing the recommended American Diabetes Association 60% carb diet (higher even than the diet that causes most of the type 2 diabetes we see) because of a more fat fueled metabolism but also, occasionally, we see a return of normal pancreatic function with the removal of the neo-lithic foods. T Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

It’s possible to simply reverse type 2 diabetes. There are only two things you need to do. By reading this brief post you’ll know what they are, and how to get started. Or skip ahead to the two steps right away > Quick start Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A fully reversible disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing thi Continue reading >>

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Image Point Fr/Shutterstock A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes means a lifetime of constant diligence. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 usually develops early in life. Those diagnosed have to check blood sugar several times a day and take insulin as needed; the process is difficult, expensive, and potentially dangerous. That helps explain the excitement about a potential cure for type 1 diabetes using an already approved treatment. Doctors diagnose more than 18,000 children and teens with type 1 diabetes every year, according to the CDC. These kids lack the ability to make enough insulin, the hormone that processes blood sugar. Using insulin injections to control blood sugar with insulin is tricky because diet, exercise, and stress can quickly alter levels. Without enough insulin, kidney, heart, and nerve damage can be the result. Get too much, and blood sugar levels will plummet dangerously low. (This is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.) Researchers in Israel have tried treating type 1 diabetics with an immune system protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha-1)—it helps target germs. Normally, insulin gets lower and lower over time in diabetics, but extra alpha-1 seems to help the body produce more. Researchers gave 12 recently diagnosed type 1 diabetics an alpha-1 drip once a week for eight weeks in a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. For a year and counting following treatment, two of the participants have been making more of their own insulin. Another three saw only minor decreases—which is a good sign. “Compared to the natural course of the disease, which is downhill, even a flat line is considered success,” says study co-author Eli C. Lewis, PhD, biochemical and pharmacology professor at Ben-Gurion University of the N Continue reading >>

50 Years Later — Beating The Type 1 Diabetes Prognosis

50 Years Later — Beating The Type 1 Diabetes Prognosis

Twenty years ago, I wrote an op-ed piece for The Courant on living with Type 1 insulin-dependent diabetes, and said my goal was to receive a 50-year medal from Joslin Diabetes Center at Harvard. Well, I did it. It will be 50 years on Wednesday. More than 4,000 medals have been awarded to people who have lived with Type 1 diabetes for 50 years. I am humbled and proud to be a member of this very small, unique, class. My first day on insulin, a hormone that allows glucose to enter the cells to be converted to energy, was Dec. 10, 1964. Back then, reaching age 50, let alone 50 years on insulin, was a long shot. Diabetes was a leading cause of death and blindness. Life expectancy was estimated to be one-third less than for people without diabetes. My making 50 didn't look promising when I was admitted to New Britain General Hospital (now The Hospital of Central Connecticut). I had lost 20 pounds in six months. My body was starving itself. I was 10 ½ and weighed 68 pounds. There are no off days living with Type 1 diabetes, which is when the pancreas does not produce insulin. Only 5 percent of people with diabetes have this form of the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 is when insulin is not used properly by the body and often is treated with diet, exercise, oral and/or injectable medications. Today I have none of the common complications of some Type 1s, such as neuropathy, blindness, stroke and kidney and heart disease. Why am I one of the fortunate ones? First of all, there were many, great medical advances in the treatment of Type 1 diabetes, since those early days of glass syringes and a blood glucose test about every three months. Patients live longer and enjoy better lives. Now, I'm on an insulin pump, which is like a mini pancreas. I test Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Home Treatment

Type 1 Diabetes - Home Treatment

Type 1 diabetes requires daily attention to diet, exercise, and insulin. You may have times when this job feels overwhelming, but getting into a daily routine can help. And taking good care of yourself will also help you feel better, have a better quality of life, and prevent or delay complications from diabetes. Carbohydrate is the one nutrient in your diet that most affects blood sugar levels. A registered dietitian can help you learn about what foods contain carbohydrate and how to manage it in your diet. You need to take injections every day, because your pancreas no longer produces insulin. To learn more, see Medications. Your doctor will want you to test your blood sugar level several times a day. It's also important to know how to recognize and treat high or low blood sugar quickly. Try to do moderate activity at least 2½ hours a week.1 One way to do this is to be active 30 minutes a day, at least 5 days a week. Exercise safely. Drink plenty of water before, during, and after you are active. This is very important when it's hot out and when you do intense exercise. You can also try keeping track of your exercise on an activity log(What is a PDF document?). Daily foot care can prevent serious problems. Foot problems caused by diabetes are the most common cause of amputations. In addition to exercising, it is a good idea to limit the amount of alcohol you drink. The American Diabetes Association recommends that women with diabetes have no more than 1 drink a day and men with diabetes have no more than 2 drinks a day.2 One drink is 12 fl oz (0.4 L) of beer, 5 fl oz (0.2 L) of wine, or 1.5 fl oz (44.4 mL) liquor. Having type 1 diabetes can cause a lot of problems in your body. Smoking can make many of these problems worse, especially heart and blood vessel disease. Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

You Can Beat Diabetes

You Can Beat Diabetes

En español | FICTION: If you're at high risk for diabetes, you're going to get the disease. FACT: The Diabetes Prevention Program — which followed more than 3,000 overweight, prediabetic men and women at 27 research centers — found that people who lost even a little weight and exercised consistently (a goal of 30 minutes five days a week) reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. (People 60 and up cut their risk by a whopping 71 percent.) "If you're overweight, try to reduce your daily intake by 500 calories," says Christine Tobin of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). FICTION: Diabetics need a special diet. FACT: Not long ago diabetics were urged to forgo sweets and drastically limit their intake of carbohydrates. But a slew of new research suggests that diabetics are best served by following the same healthy guidelines everyone else does: plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and dairy products, and sparing amounts of heart-healthy fats. FICTION: There's a cure for diabetes. FACT: Halle Berry's claims to the contrary — in 2007 she announced she had been cured of her type 1 diabetes — there is no cure for either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, says Sue Kirkman, M.D., senior vice president at the ADA. According to a study published last year in the Annals of Internal Medicine, however, 56 percent of type 2 diabetics who followed a Mediterranean-style diet could control their blood sugar without medication. FICTION: Being overweight causes diabetes. FACT: Just because you're heavy doesn't mean you'll automatically get diabetes. In fact, 34 percent of adults 20 and older are obese, but just 10.7 percent have diabetes. Still, experts agree that being obese, especially combined with a genetic predisposition for diabetes, can tr Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Beat The Diabetes Blues

7 Ways To Beat The Diabetes Blues

Written by Susan McQuillan, MS, RDN, CDN Up to 29% of people with diabetes also suffer from major depression. Those who have type 2 diabetes and use insulin have higher rates of depression than those with type 1 or with type 2 not using insulin. Women are almost twice as likely as men to succumb to major depression, which hits hardest between the ages of 30 and 59. If you become depressed, it can affect your ability to manage your own health. Heres what you can do to control your emotions before they control you. Talk to your family and friends about what it means to have diabetes so they understand your needs, concerns and frustrations. Describe what it feels like when your blood sugar goes out of range. Let them know exactly how they can help. Explain that you are not always able to control your blood sugar , even when youre doing everything right, so you may need some empathy. If you are changing your diet and making healthier food choices, you may want to ask them to join you, and keep junk food out of the house. Try to find an exercise buddy. Taking steps to manage your blood sugar levels and generally taking good care of yourself is obviously essential for your own physical and mental health, but staying in control also helps strengthen your relationships, because it puts less pressure on your loved ones, who may worry about you or have to help take care of you. When you are consistent, and your blood sugar routinely stays within an acceptable range, diabetes can become just one more thing in your life; it doesnt have to be the big thing that takes over your life or anyone elses. When you are diagnosed with diabetes, you have to make changes in some of your daily habits in order to stay healthy. Change usually doesnt usually come easily or quickly because most of Continue reading >>

12 Monumental Ways To Beat Diabetes Today

12 Monumental Ways To Beat Diabetes Today

Diabetes Can Be Reversed Despite Common Belief Diabetes is a growing global epidemic that affects millions of people worldwide, but recent studies on various natural remedies for diabetes provide hope for reversing this disease. From adopting a fasting-mimicking diet to incorporating superfoods like spirulina and ginseng, there are lots of natural options that provide long-lasting results. Committing to healthy choices and positive lifestyle changes has helped many people overcome the disease, proving that Diabetes does not have to be a life sentence. Diabetes: Risk Factors Type 2 Diabetes plagues the United States, but is even more rampant in many developing countries, triggered in large part by a shift to less healthy nutritional habits and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, all fueled by the drive of rapid urbanization and economic growth. Asia is one of the largest epicenters of this disease, with an estimated 60 percent of the world’s diabetes patients living in that region. Diabetics often find their bodies swinging wildly out of equilibrium. In Type 1 Diabetes, the body attacks insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, causing a rise in blood sugar levels. In Type 2 Diabetes there is insufficient insulin produced in the pancreas, which slows the metabolism and elevates blood sugar levels. Both conditions, if not treated correctly, can cause a host of unpleasant side effects including high blood pressure, neuropathy, kidney damage, and in extreme cases amputation and even death. Diabetes Conventional Treatments Conventional treatment for Type 1 Diabetes generally involves insulin supplementation in the form of injections. Because Type 1 is an autoimmune disorder, it can affect both children and adults, and it’s not uncommon for diabetics to be dependent on life Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes . . . Cured?

Type 1 Diabetes . . . Cured?

Carrie posted this wonderfully thought-provoking comment about her diabetic son: My 13 yr old son was diagnosed over a year ago with Type 1 [diabetes]. Before his diagnosis, I was very ‘green’ — bought organic foods, bought meat from free-range, grass-fed local farms, cleaned my house with products I made myself from vinegar and natural products. But we did follow the low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, healthy whole grain diet. We were told “eat whatever you want” — just dose for it [with insulin] and be healthy (yep: low-fat, high-fiber, etc.) I didn’t think so: If he has a carb problem, then limit carbs! We immediately went low-carb, causing us to remove a lot of wheat products, but didn’t know about the damages of gluten then. His last two A1Cs [hemoglobin A1c’s, a 60-90 day reflection of blood sugar fluctuations] have been 5.3% [normal range]. He was taken off his basal insulin and his bolus, continuing to less and less. Today, he is OFF insulin! YES, he is a Type 1 diabetic: They double-checked for the antibodies in case he was misdiagnosed–they are there. Even without insulin, his blood sugars are better than me or his dad, or even sister (we all check now). And all this while growing over 5 inches in one year, going through puberty and the stomach flu with no problems (scary for Type 1 diabetics). His doctors are amazed. We all still did not know how he was this way, until someone shared with me Wheat Belly. We are all going completely gluten-free now and staying low-carb. Maybe my asthma will be gone and my daughter’s horrible itchy rash all over her arms will finally leave! Absolutely wonderful book, thank you! Wow. We know that consumption of modern wheat is associated with causing type 1 diabetes in children, average age of onset 4 years Continue reading >>

More in diabetes