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Diabetes And Beer: 4 Tips For Your Night Out

Diabetes And Beer: 4 Tips For Your Night Out

People with diabetes are accustomed to monitoring their food choices and portions. However, they often overlook some critical areas of their disease. One of these is alcohol consumption. The common way of thinking is that unless the individual is an alcoholic, drinking beer isn't going to have a negative impact on their disease. But is that really true about diabetes and beer? Can even one beer alter blood glucose levels? The short answer is yes. Alcohol can lower glucose levels, whether you have one beer or 10. This can be dangerous for individuals who are taking insulin, since combining insulin with beer can create a hypoglycemic episode. Social drinking can be even more dangerous because it's easier to lose sight of how much alcohol you are consuming until your blood sugar drops too low. Some may argue that only drinking a few beers isn't going to cause enough damage to warrant concern. In reality, anytime blood sugar levels get too high or too low, your body will be impacted. Nevertheless, you don't have to give up drinking entirely. Here are four tips on how to drink responsibly. 1. Eat while you drink Remember: alcohol remains in your system longer than glucose from food, so you should only consume beer with food. Drinking beer with a meal helps slow the rate of alcohol absorption and offers some protection against sugar spikes or dips. 2. Try a light beer, but be aware Light beer or brands that are low carb can help a little, but they don't entirely solve the problem. Beer is loaded with sugar, so remember that you need to treat it like a sugar-laden dessert. Check out this table of popular beers and their alcohol and carb content to help you plan ahead. 3. Know your meds Those who use insulin aren't the only ones who need to be aware of their beer consumption. T Continue reading >>

Bears And Diabetes | Oupblog

Bears And Diabetes | Oupblog

Eric Chivian , MD, is the founder and Director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School. In 1980, he co-founded, with three other Harvard faculty members, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War , which won the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. Aaron Bernstein , MD has been affiliated with the Center for Health and the Global Environment since 2001 and is currently a resident in the Boston Combined Residency in Pediatrics . Together they wrote Sustaining Life: How Human Health Depends on Biodiversity which presents a comprehensive review of how human medicines, biomedical research, the emergence and spread of infectious diseases, and the production of food all depend on biodiversity. Chivian was recently interview on Canadas The Hour, you can watch him here . In the excerpt below from the book we learn more about the importance of Polar Bears. Nine species of bears are listed on the IUCNs 206 Red List of Threatened Animal Species, including the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus), the Giant Panda (Alluropoda melanoleuca) and the Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus). In 2005, the Polar Bear Specialist Group of the IUCN Species Survival Commission reviewed the status of the Polar Bear and decided to list it as a Vulnerable species, increasing its degree of threat from Lower Risk, given the projected loss of habitat resulting from global climate change. And in 2006, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began a review to consider whether Polar Bears should also be protected under the Endangered Species Act, a decision that is expected in early 2008. Influencing this decision will be a series of studies released in September 2007 by the U.S. Geological Survey predicting that two-thirds of the worlds Polar Bears will be lost by 2050 beca Continue reading >>

How Fat Grizzly Bears Stay Diabetes-free

How Fat Grizzly Bears Stay Diabetes-free

Every fall, grizzly bears pack on the pounds in preparation for their winter hibernation. In humans, such extreme weight gain would likely lead to diabetes or other metabolic diseases, but the bears manage to stay healthy year after year. Their ability to remain diabetes-free, researchers have now discovered, can be chalked up to the shutting down of a protein found in fat cells. The discovery could lead to new diabetes drugs that turn off the same pathway in humans. The findings are “provocative and interesting,” says biologist Sandy Martin of the University of Colorado, Denver, who was not involved in the new work. “They found a natural solution to a problem that we haven’t been able to solve.” As people gain weight, fat, liver, and muscle cells typically become less sensitive to the hormone insulin—which normally helps control blood sugar levels—and insulin levels rise. In turn, that increased insulin prevents the breakdown of fat cells, causing a vicious cycle that can lead to full-blown insulin resistance, or diabetes. Get more great content like this delivered right to you! By signing up, you agree to share your email address with the publication. Information provided here is subject to Science's privacy policy. Developing new diabetes drugs has been hampered by the fact that findings from many mouse models of diabetes have not translated to humans. So Kevin Corbit, a senior scientist at Thousand Oaks, California–based drug company Amgen, decided to start looking at obesity and metabolic disease in other animals. “When I was thinking about things that are quite fat, one of the first things I thought of was bears, and what they do to prepare to go into hibernation,” he says. “But of course you don’t see bears running around with diabetes and Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear

Jerry The Bear

Jerry is currently available in the US through Beyond Type 1 Jerry is currently available in Canada through Diabetes Express By taking care of Jerry's diabetes, children gain hands-on practice with counting carbs, monitoring Jerry's blood sugar, and dosing Jerry with insulin. Kids care for Jerry using the virtual diabetes tools and the digital pantry in our app! Check Jerry's blood sugar by lancing Jerry's finger and adding a test strip to the glucometer! When Jerry's blood sugar goes high or low, Jerry speaks symptoms, encouraging kids to recognize how they feel. Use Jerry's insulin pen or pump to dose insulin. Learn about injection site rotation by using the injection sites on Jerry's arms, legs, belly, and butt. Feed Jerry a healthy diet or give him junk food! Either way, kids learn about the impact that carbs have on blood sugar, and learn carb counts for basic foods in Jerry's virtual kitchen. Follow along with Jerry's journey to train for the All Stars Games! All 21 interactive story books are paired with care tasks to reinforce important diabetes lessons. Our curriculum is co-designed with doctors, educators, and families to create educational content that kids love. Check Jerry's blood sugar by following the steps of lancing Jerry's finger and adding a test strip to the glucometer! When Jerry's blood sugar goes high or low, Jerry speaks symptoms, encouraging kids to recognize how they feel. Use Jerry's insulin pen or pump to dose insulin. Learn about injection site rotation by using the injection sites on Jerry's arms, legs, belly, and butt. Feed Jerry a healthy diet or give him junk food! Either way, kids learn about the impact that carbs have on blood sugar, and learn carb counts for basic foods in Jerry's virtual kitchen. Follow along with Jerry's journey to Continue reading >>

How Motivating Is A Diabetes Teddy Bear? | Ask D'mine

How Motivating Is A Diabetes Teddy Bear? | Ask D'mine

Ask D'Mine: Just the (Diabetes Bear) Facts Written by Wil Dubois on January 20, 2018 Happy Saturday! Welcome to Ask D'Mine, our weekly advice column hosted by veteran type 1 and diabetes author W il Dubois in New Mexico, who also has experience as a clinical diabetes specialist. This week, Wil ponders the mystery of "disappearing diabetes" -- or when it seems like blood sugar control has magically gone on auto-pilot(?) Here's Wil's take on that. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Elizabeth, grandma of a type 1 from Idaho, writes: Im worried about my little grandson. When he was diagnosed two or three years ago he was given a Rufus Teddy Bear that, like him, had diabetes. The bear has been a constant companion until just recently. When I asked him where Rufus was, he told me that Rufus was cured and didnt have diabetes anymore. Im worried that because hes decided his bear is cured that he might decide to stop taking his insulin shots, which he learned to do at a very early age. What do you think? Am I worried for nothing, or is there a risk here? [email protected] DMine answers: I love Rufus ! For any of you who havent had the pleasure of meeting him, Rufus is a Teddy Bear who has diabetes. He comes complete with a medic alert bracelet and with little patches showing where he needs his shots and where he needs his paw pricked for his blood sugar tests. His mission (and the mission of his various sponsors through the JDRF over the years) is to make the childhood diagnosis experience less lonely. JDRF tells me that 163,000 Rufus bears have been given to newly diagnosed children as part of their Bags of Hope kits since Carol Cramer sewed the first one for her own child with diabetes in 1996 (and then went on to create the next 1,300 bears at her own exp Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear For Kids With Type 1 Diabetes: New & Improved!

Jerry The Bear For Kids With Type 1 Diabetes: New & Improved!

Jerry the Bear for Kids with Type 1 Diabetes: New & Improved! Jerry the Bear is a pretty special fella. He isnt just soft and cuddly. He isnt just smiley and cute. This bearknows what its like to wear an insulin pump and receive insulin injections because Jerry the Bear is a bear with type 1 diabetes . And hes here to help your kiddos with type 1 diabetes feel a little less alone, and a little less like the only one around who has to deal with diabetes every day. Founded by Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung , Jerry the Bear is designed to help your child learn about diabetes while also feeling like theyre not alone. Through playing games, Jerry the Bear teaches kids with diabetes about all aspects of the disease, such as: but with his new and improved features, he does even more to help your child with type 1 learn about managing their blood sugar.We spoke with Jerrys creators about his latest features in this interview: For those who dont already know the original Jerry the Bear, could you give a simpleexplanation of what hes all about Jerry the Bear is a best friend for kids with type 1 diabetes. By taking care of Jerrys diabetes,children gain hands-on practice with counting carbs, monitoring Jerrys blood sugar, and dosingJerry with insulin. Kids can also follow along Jerrys journey of training for the All Stars Game through 21 animated storybooks. Who created Jerry the Bear? How did the idea for him come about? Jerry the Bear is created by Sproutel. Were a research, design, and development company thatmakes interactive educational companions for kids health. Sproutel has been recognized byPresident Obama and the White House and little Jerry has even been programmed to wishPresident Obama a happy birthday! The insight to create Jerry came from observing children with t Continue reading >>

Falsified Data And Diabetes: Grizzly Bears, Chocolate And Serious Misconduct

Falsified Data And Diabetes: Grizzly Bears, Chocolate And Serious Misconduct

Falsified data and diabetes: Grizzly bears, chocolate and serious misconduct Falsified data and diabetes: Grizzly bears, chocolate and serious misconduct A scientific paper investigating diabetes and obesity in grizzly bears was retracted from the journal Cell Metabolism on Tuesday. The reason: a scientist manipulated data. This is by no means the first time falsified data and diabetes research have crossed paths. This paper was originally published in August 2014. Amgen, a biotech company, was investigating how the metabolisms of grizzly bears adjust to hibernation, to further understand the biology behind diabetes and obesity. The researchers reported that when the bears were at their fattest, they managed to remain highly sensitive to insulin. During hibernation, the bears entered a similar state to type 2 diabetes as insulin sensitivity reduced, which enabled them to break down fat stores to survive. This was due to a protein called PTEN in fat cells, according to Amgen researchers. PTEN allowed the bears to become more or less insulin sensitive when needed, and upon waking from hibernation, the bears recovered from their diabetic state. The study suggested that diabetes and obesity could exist naturally on opposite ends of the metabolic spectrum, according to lead investigator Dr Kevin Corbit. However, late last year, Amgen discovered that some experimental data had been changed. We know data were actually manipulated, and that just cannot stand, said Alexander Kamb, Amgens research chief. Lamb was not one of the 12 authors of the study. Cell Metabolism was quickly contacted for a retraction, and following a review by the journal, it was retracted on Tuesday . A lone company scientist was reportedly to blame, and while Amgen claim the data manipulation did not aff Continue reading >>

The New Jerry The Bear.

The New Jerry The Bear.

Since theyre local to me here in Rhode Island, I drove up to the Jerry the Bear office to meet with my friends Aaron Horowitz and Hannah Chung, creators of Jerry the Bear. Its awesome to see you guys! Where have you been the last few years? After hugs and hellos, I realized my question was unfair. Because they havent been hiding but instead, the team behind Jerry the Bear has been working tirelessly to change their business in efforts to meet their mission of getting Jerry into the hands of every child diagnosed with type 1 diabetes globally. Thats quite a mission. But if anyone can accomplish this goal, the driven, passionate, creative, and all-heart team behind Jerry can. A post shared by Kerri Sparling (@sixuntilme) on As a business, we know that Jerry the Bear works , but in order to succeed and survive, we need to make the business work. Weve been working to move our company from a direct to consumer model to a business-to-business model. This means were not selling our bears directly to people but instead have partnered with two different distributors in order to get Jerry into kids hands, said Jerry the Bear co-founder and CEO, Aaron Horowitz. Namely, theyve partnered with Beyond Type 1 to handle domestic and international orders (except Canada) and Diabetes Express for our neighbors to the north. We want to improve life with diabetes for kids by giving them something positive to associate with diabetes, said Hannah Chung, co-founder and CCO. The Sproutel team did a lot of research in developing new Jerry. In addition to marathon sessions with post it notes, building paper prototypes, and body storming, the team went into the field to access kids in their natural play habitats. Hannah told me that she went to playgrounds during the development phase in order to Continue reading >>

Retraction Of Grizzly Bear-diabetes Study Follows Departure Of Amgen Scientist For Data Manipulation

Retraction Of Grizzly Bear-diabetes Study Follows Departure Of Amgen Scientist For Data Manipulation

Retraction of grizzly bear-diabetes study follows departure of Amgen scientist for data manipulation The retracted paper made the cover of the August 2014 issue of the journal. A study thatlooked to hibernating bears to understand the mechanisms behind diabetes has been retracted because an author based at the biotech company Amgen manipulated specific experimental data in twofigures. According to the The Wall Street Journal ,Amgendiscovered the manipulationwhile reviewing the data following publication of the paper, Grizzly bears exhibit augmented insulin sensitivity while obese prior to a reversible insulin resistance during hibernation .Published in Cell Metabolism last year, the paper has been cited 8 times, according to Thomson Scientifics Web of Knowledge. A press release from the journal last year coverage in Science and Nature followed explained the purpose of the study: While diabetes rates are on the rise and are having serious effects on millions of peoples health, researchers studying grizzly bears have now discovered a natural state of diabetes that serves a real biological purpose and is also reversible. Investigators reporting in the August 5 issue of the Cell Press journal Cell Metabolism note that grizzly bears are obese but not diabetic in the fall, become diabetic only weeks later in hibernation, and then somehow become cured of diabetes when they wake up in the spring. The research reveals how natural biology, through evolutionary experimentation, can teach us new things about how animals naturally cope with conditions that would cause disease in humans. And heres the retraction note , which details the studysproblems: This article has been retracted at the request of the authors. Amgen requested the retraction as an outcome of an internal review wh Continue reading >>

5 Things You Need To Know About Drinking And Diabetes

5 Things You Need To Know About Drinking And Diabetes

Having a drink at a barbecue or the cottage is a popular way to unwind and relax on the long weekend, but for people living with diabetes there are some serious risks involved. Joanne Lewis, dietitian and Manager of Diabetes Research for the Canadian Diabetes Association, sat down with Current to discuss some facts and tips for drinking and diabetes. Whether it’s counting your calories or making the right beverage choices, here are five things every person with diabetes needs to know: 1) Alcohol Alone Won’t Raise Your Blood-Sugar: Although it’s a common misconception, Lewis says alcohol in itself won’t raise your blood sugar. It’s often the added sugars found in coolers, liqueurs and soda that can raise your levels. “A lot of people are under the misconception that it can raise your blood sugar, and so what they might do is they might have a drink and not eat, because they’re thinking, ‘ok, the alcohol is going to raise my sugar’. “But if they’re taking insulin or certain oral medications, they can actually end up with a low blood sugar, because alcohol affects the liver that way. The liver gets busy detoxifying the alcohol to where it’s not producing the sugar it needs to produce to get into the blood to keep everything leveled,” she says. 2) Choose Your Beverage Wisely: You may be longing for a tangy margarita, or tempted to try a mixed drink with sugar sodas, but the reality is these drinks will raise your blood sugar levels. Lewis says if you have to drink, dry wines (including Merlot, Malbec, Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Grigio), beer or straight liquor is less likely to raise your blood sugar. 3) Beer and Carbs are Complicated: Carbohydrate counting can often be as much a concern as blood sugar levels. Lewis says experts no longer count alco Continue reading >>

Build-a-bear Diabetes Kit (hooray!)

Build-a-bear Diabetes Kit (hooray!)

Summary: Build-A-Bear has added a Diabetes Kit to their accessory line that includes an insulin pump, glucose meter, and lancing device. It retails for $10 and is available online and in select stores. I have a few friends who have many, many stuffed animals from Build-A-Bear and their collections seem to be constantly growing. Qs collection would grow exponentially if we had a BAB store in our town, but she only gets to shop for them in person when we travel. I was on Facebook recently and one of my friends (Hi, Stacey!) posted a picture of her newest bear. And it was wearing an insulin pump! A bunch of us T1Ds and parents of T1D kiddos instantly commented wanting to know where we, too, could get an insulin pump for our bears. I immediately reached out to Build-A-Bear wanting to know more. They were kind enough to send us the Diabetes Kit so we could see it in person and share it with you. Im awaiting answers to some questions I have about the how and why BAB decided to add it to their accessory line. But I really wanted to share this with you as soon as possible in case you are looking for one more special holiday gift for your child with diabetes. The Diabetes Kit is available online and in select stores (you can do a search on the product page for stores near you) and sells for $10. It includes an insulin pump on a waistband, a glucose meter, and a lancing device. Q thinks its so cute, especially the heart on the meter, and immediately her bear was diagnosed with diabetes. (And you are never too old to play with bears. Am I right?) If you have a Lenny the Lion , which is made by Build-A-Bear and is available to Medtronic insulin pump users, this would be an awesome accessory. But how cool is it that you can now accessorize any of the many BAB animals with his or he Continue reading >>

Jerry The Bear A New-age T1d Toy

Jerry The Bear A New-age T1d Toy

Beyond Type 1 is proud to offer Jerry the Bears for purchase here . Quantities are limited. Available worldwide, (not available in China). Uses both mg/dL andmmol/L. For purchases in Canada, visit here . Meet Jerry . Hes a bear. Not just any bear though. Think: teddy bear comfort meets tech-world innovation. Built by Sproutel , an R&D studio, Jerry the Bear is a new-age teaching tool for children with Type 1 diabetes that simulates what its like to have the chronic illness. Through interaction with Jerry the Bear, children learn how to take care of him and in the process themselves. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common endocrine and metabolic conditions in childhood; incidence is rapidly increasing especially among the youngest children. ( Diabetes Atlas 7th ed.) Early days of diagnosis are disorienting for both child and parents as the entire family must learn how to manage this unrelenting disease with rigorous testing and insulin dosing. The task is by no means easy. The idea behind Jerry the Bear is that children are able to check his blood sugar, feed him their own food selection (with carb counts) and then administer insulin for those carbs all through augmented-reality play with their smartphone and a cuddly teddy bear with special embroidery. Sproutels motto is, Diabetes management takes a village, and with this realization, Jerrythe Bear is not only a teaching tool for the child with Type 1 but also for the entire family and even extended community. It bridges empathy between child and parent, says Sproutel Co-founder and CEO, Aaron Horowitz. We have a lot of kids who use Jerry the Bear to explain Type 1 diabetes to their classmates. Parents have even given Jerry to grandparents and family members Continue reading >>

The Cure To Diabetes May Be Hiding In Grizzly Bears

The Cure To Diabetes May Be Hiding In Grizzly Bears

Biochemist Kevin Corbit had a question: Why don't fat bears get diabetes or other diseases as they bulk up for winter? In humans, obesity is considered a primary risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but grizzlies, as Corbit points out to Science, don't get diabetes. The answer, according to a new study published today in Cell Metabolism , is that a cellular switch helps grizzly bears recover from potentially diabetic conditions. When obese bears hibernate, a biochemical signal keeps the grizzlies' fat cells from becoming desensitized to the hormone insulin. Humans, on the other hand, don't have this switch -- and as we lose the ability to respond to insulin, our bodies release too much blood sugar, resulting in type 2 diabetes . Leading up to the colder months, grizzlies pack on the pounds, eating up to 58,000 calories a day (that's the caloric equivalent of about 100 Big Macs). After a few weeks of hibernation, bears begin to show signs of insulin resistance. But by the time the bears wake up in springtime, their cellular switches have been flicked. The grizzlies are once again more sensitive insulin -- it's as if the bears had averted becoming diabetic. Continue reading >>

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do

Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do Why Fat Grizzlies Don't Get Diabetes Like We Do Bears can eat like pigs, hibernate for months and still be healthy. This seems so unfair. Tim Shobe/iStockphoto hide caption Bears can eat like pigs, hibernate for months and still be healthy. This seems so unfair. Sometimes nature comes up with elegant solutions to difficult problems, like how to gain weight and not get diabetes. Take, for instance, the grizzly bear. How does this 750-pound mammal survive long, lean winters? Well, it just gets really fat beforehand and then sleeps the hungry season away. Grizzly bears can easily double their body fat in the months leading up to hibernation. For us humans, this kind of weight gain could result in some pretty serious health consequences one of the most common being Type 2 diabetes. But grizzly bears are adept at staying healthy despite their dramatic fluctuations in weight, reports a study published Tuesday in Cell Metabolism. According to the report, the grizzly's ability to pack on the pounds and then use that energy efficiently during hibernation might have to do with the surprising way that its body responds to the hormone insulin. If Polar Bears Can Eat A Ton Of Fat And Be Healthy, Why Can't We? "The results were so different from what we see in humans and rodents that we were all very skeptical at first," says Kevin Corbit, a senior scientist at Amgen Inc. , a biotechnology firm in Thousand Oaks, Calif., who led the research team. "This was a complete surprise," he says. Amgen is interested in the potential this research has to help treat obesity and diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, and it instructs fat, liver and muscle tissue to suck up blood sugar and convert it into fat. In humans, weight gai Continue reading >>

Camping In Bear Country With Type 1 Diabetes

Camping In Bear Country With Type 1 Diabetes

Brought to you by Lilly Diabetes | Disney Camping in Bear Country With Type 1 Diabetes Last summer, we went camping in one of our favorite vacation spots: Yosemite National Park. We had done a fair amount of camping since Kaitlyn was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, so we were feeling like we had the whole camping with diabetes thing down pretty well. However, this was our first time in bear country since her diagnosis. For those who havent been camping in bear country before, rule number one is to always store your food in bear boxes. Amazingly, a bear can smell even a sealed can of food through a locked car and will tear a door off to get it! It had been a particularly big year for bear encounters in Yosemite, and bears had actually come through our campsite twice while we were there. So, we were VERY careful about keeping all of our food, toiletries, and even our baby wipes in the bear box. Most of the time, using the bear box wasnt a huge inconvenience. We would get our food out during meal times and then lock it back up when we were done. But the nighttime routine was another story The first night we were there, I checked Kaitlyns blood sugar holding a flashlight in my mouth. I finally got a reading and it was low! Argh! I had to find my shoes, zip open the tent, and get her juice out of the bear box. To make matters worse, I woke up half the camp with the insanely loud latch on the bear box. I went back to the tent, gave Kaitlyn the juice, went all the way over to the bear-proof trash cans to throw away the almost empty juice box, and then made my way back to the tent. The next morning my sister (who was camping with her family next to us), told us that she was convinced there was a bear trying to break into our bear box. We both had a pretty good laugh when I tol Continue reading >>

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