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Bcg Vaccine Diabetes 2017

Reversing The Effects Of Diabetes

Reversing The Effects Of Diabetes

Home // ... // Clinical Laboratory News // CLN Stat // Reversing the Effects of Diabetes Tuberculosis vaccine shows promise in restoring immune-regulating Treg function. Generic bacillus Calmette-Gurin (BCG) vaccine shows potential in reversing advanced type 1 diabetes by restoring proper immune response to pancreatic islet cells, according to findings presented at the 75th Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association. BCG is derived from a harmless bacterial strain that causes tuberculosis and has been around for more than a century. It currently has U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for TB and bladder cancer treatment. However, a number of studies worldwide have been testing its potential as an agent for preventing and reversing autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes. According to Denise Faustman, MD, PhD, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Immunobiology Laboratory and principal investigator of the trial, BCG is of interest due its ability to permanently restore beneficial Treg genes through repeat vaccinationsthus halting the abnormal self-reactivity in type 1 diabetes.This process of modulating gene expression is known as epigenetics and could apply to other autoimmune diseases, Faustman said in a statement . Such a discovery now provides a better idea of how BCG vaccination appears to work by powerfully modulating Treg induction and resetting the immune system to halt the underlying cause of the disease, she said. Faustmans team trailblazed this effort first by recording type 1 diabetes reversal in mice, then advancing to a successful phase I clinical trial in humans with long-term diabetes. The phase 1 clinical trial with results reported in 2012 found that two injections of BCG spaced four weeks apart led to temporary eliminati Continue reading >>

Could The Tb Vaccine Cure Type 1 Diabetes? Scientists ‘discover Bcg Jab Can Reverse The Disease’

Could The Tb Vaccine Cure Type 1 Diabetes? Scientists ‘discover Bcg Jab Can Reverse The Disease’

REPEAT doses of the TB vaccine could reverse type 1 diabetes, scientists believe - raising hopes of a potential cure. The BCG jab could reset the immune system, to stop the underlying cause of the disease, new findings suggest. Getty Images Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, that prevents the body from producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body break down glucose in the blood, to give you energy. It's often described as the key that unlocks the door to the body's cells. Once that door is unlocked and glucose can enter, the body's cells can use it as fuel. Without insulin there's no key to unlock the door, and glucose builds up in the blood. Type 1 diabetes develops when the insulin-producing cells in the body have been destroyed, when the immune system mistakes those cells as an infection and destroys them. Now, a team of experts at Massachusetts General Hospital, believe the BCG jab could reverse that damage caused to the insulin-producing cells. In a study carried out in mice, scientists were able to successfully reverse the condition in rodents who had advanced type 1 diabetes. The jab is currently given to children aged 13 at school as part of the NHS immunisation programme. But, scientists now believe repeat doses could be the key to curing type 1 diabetes. Dr Denise Faustman, who led the trial, said the vaccine could trigger a permanent change to the genes in the body that restores immune cells, called Tregs. Tregs are known as the immune system's "brakes", and normally work to stop the body mistakenly attacking itself. By "turning on" the brakes it's possible to stop the immune system attacking the pancreas, causing type 1 diabetes. The theory could also work with other autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, the researchers sai Continue reading >>

Author Advances Damaging Myth About Diabetes

Author Advances Damaging Myth About Diabetes

Jim Hirsch, diaTribe contributor and bestselling author, weighs in on a damaging diabetes myth: “They’re never going to cure diabetes, because there’s too much money in it.” This article prompted a letter of complaint from Dr. Denise Faustman, printed below, followed by responses from Jeffrey Brewer and Mr. Hirsch. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes 40 years ago, and I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard someone say that or words to that effect. It’s understandable. Diabetes is big business, and as the drugs and medical devices have become more sophisticated and expensive each year – and as more people are diagnosed each day – diabetes itself becomes an even bigger business. In the United States, about $200 billion a year is spent in direct costs for diabetes, including hospital and emergency care. Hence the conclusion: In the view of frustrated patients, family members, and loved ones, there’s just too much money to be made in this disease for a cure to ever be found. Powerful corporate interests will see to that. Even worse: Conspiracy theorists believe that the companies that profit from diabetes are actively thwarting a cure. Or as one person told me, “Eli Lilly has the cure in its vault, but it won’t let it out.” *** I was recently listening to NPR and heard the writer Elisabeth Rosenthal discuss her new book, “American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back.” The title captures her central theme, that health care in America has been compromised by corporations that have their put their financial interests ahead of all else. Profits trump patients. During the NPR interview, she described how health care companies stand to earn more from therapies than from cures. “If you’re a pharmaceutical Continue reading >>

Get Information On Our Clinical Trials

Get Information On Our Clinical Trials

BCG Human Clinical Trials Program The Faustman Lab is conducting clinical trials in long-term type 1 diabetes through the BCG Human Clinical Trial Program. This program is testing Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an inexpensive generic drug that temporarily elevates levels of TNF (a signaling protein involved in the body’s immune responses), to see if it will benefit patients living with type 1 diabetes by eliminating the disease-causing T cells that attack and destroy the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Under the direction of Dr. Faustman and David Nathan, MD, director of the MGH Diabetes Center, a double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase I human clinical trial was conducted and demonstrated that BCG vaccination is not only safe in individuals with advanced type 1 diabetes, but may also be effective in reversing long-term disease. In the study, BCG was administered to adults who had been living with type 1 diabetes for an average of 15 years. Treatment helped eliminate the defective T cells that mistakenly attack and destroy the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, also temporarily restoring the ability of the pancreas to produce small amounts of insulin. The results of the Phase I study were published in 2012. Major Findings from the Phase I Trial The major findings from the Phase I study were: • The BCG vaccine with multi-dosing was safe in advanced type 1 diabetes. • Although the drug was given in relatively small doses, we saw targeted death of the “bad” T cells that attack the insulin-secreting islets, an early sign that BCG has the potential to stop the autoimmune attack and successfully reverse disease. • In people living with diabetes for an average of 15 years, there was a transient increase in/restoration of pancreatic insulin secretion Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: Discovery Of Type-4 Diabetes & A New Vaccine For Type-1 | Let's Care - The Official Blog Of Care Hospitals

Diabetes Update: Discovery Of Type-4 Diabetes & A New Vaccine For Type-1 | Let's Care - The Official Blog Of Care Hospitals

Diabetes Update: Discovery of Type-4 Diabetes & a New Vaccine for Type-1 In two separate news items over the last week, two major updates have been released that can revolutionize the world of diabetes. Firstly, researchers at AIIMS, New Delhi have discovered a new type of diabetes and named it the type-4 diabetes. Secondly, at its 75th Scientific Sessions, the American Diabetes Association announced that it would be testing the Bacillus Calmette-Geurin (a vaccination used to treat tuberculosis) to treat type-1 diabetes as it has shown promise in reversing diabetes. Lets discuss these updates one by one. While a majority of us are struggling to understand type-1 and type-2 diabetes , the study by scientists from AIIMS (All India Institute of Medical Sciences) talks about type-4 diabetes, which affects the brain and eye tissues. According to the doctors who conducted this study, this diabetes is quite different from the others that occur due to high levels of glucose in the blood. The type-4 diabetes affects the brain and eye tissues and this discovery can open new avenues of therapy for glaucoma and neurodegenerative diseases. Dr Muneeb Faiq, a clinical researcher studying glaucoma and neurodegeneration and Dr Tanuj Dada, a professor of ophthalmology at AIIMS, New Delhi conducted this study together. While type-1 and type-2 diabetes occur due to increased levels of glucose in the blood and type-3 diabetes occurs due to certain insulin resistance that causes symptoms similar to Alzheimers disease , type-4 diabetes can be linked to glaucoma and neurodegenerative diseases. Glaucoma, a dangerous eye disorder that can cause permanent blindness, currently affects 65 million people worldwide. Often nicknamed the sneak thief of sight , this disorder can damage the optic nerve Continue reading >>

The Vaccine For Type-1 Diabetes Is Moving Forward

The Vaccine For Type-1 Diabetes Is Moving Forward

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. A promising vaccine that has the potential to reverse the symptoms of type I diabetes—an autoimmune disease often diagnosed in childhood—is heading on to a phase II trial, which will test the vaccine on humans with the chronic disease. The vaccine, called bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has succeed in reversing type 1 diabetes in a trial among mice and in a phase I trial in 103 humans. The new trial, which the researchers announced on Sunday at the Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association, will last for five years and will test the effect of the vaccine on people with type 1 diabetes among adults between ages 18 to 60. The vaccine may be able to improve the disease in people who have small but detectable levels of insulin coming from their pancreas. Lead researcher Dr. Denise Faustman, director of immunobiology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), estimates that about one million people with type 1 diabetes still produce some insulin. BCG is already FDA-approved as a vaccine for tuberculosis and as a bladder cancer treatment. Researchers have shown that the vaccine can eliminates problematic white blood cells that lead to type 1 diabetes by destroying the beta cells that make and release insulin into the blood. Previously, the study authors showed they were able to temporarily eliminate the abnormal white blood cells and provide a small return of insulin. The new trial will provide more frequent doses of the vaccine over a five year periods in 150 adults with the disease. The researchers hope that the vaccine will produce better blood sugar control and could be used to treat advanced disease. “Type 1 diabetics are a pretty skeptical audience,” says Faustman. “There’s been a lot of disappointment [f Continue reading >>

Boston Childrens Hospital Article About Type One Diabetes And A Cure

Boston Childrens Hospital Article About Type One Diabetes And A Cure

Boston childrens hospital article about type one diabetes and a cure on the news tonight they reported on a possible cure for type on diabetes. here is the article that was reported. I believe that Denise Faustman cured diabetes in mice several years back. She is now conducting phase II trials in humans. And because her treatment involves medication that is already approved for other uses, the path to regulatory approval should be shorter. Im always happy to see new research being conducted on diabetes cures, but I am not hopeful that this new research will lead to that in the next 10 years. i just thought the article was interesting and to me hopeful. i didnt know that denise faustman did a trial. i know that she was working on it. but didnt know that she started trials. so even if it does involve medication it still isnt a cure per se. and with the next 10 years it may be shorter depending on how successful the trials are on humans once it gets there. or there may be another doctor that may find another way to cure it while this is going on Even at its best, this treatment would only halt the development of type 1 diabetes in newly-diagnosed patients, since we already know from the thousands of cases in which patients with established type 1 diabetes have had their immune systems suppressed to allow for organ transplants, the beta cells of the pancreas, once they have been destroyed by the patients autoimmunity, do not regenerate. Dr. Faustman looked around for a while for something that would induce the beta cells to regrow once the autoimmune attack was stopped, and she tried spleen cells and the INGAP polypeptide, but nothing achieved clinically significant results, and after thirty years of work she still has no useful results. Even if this was something that cou Continue reading >>

Dr. Faustman’s Type 1 Reversal Trial Seeks More Participants

Dr. Faustman’s Type 1 Reversal Trial Seeks More Participants

Denise Faustman, MD, PhD, is the Director of the Immunobiology Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She was interviewed by Diabetes Daily about 9 years ago when she was about to begin human clinical trials based on the results from her successful mice-curing BCG vaccine. Mice are certainly cured from type 1 diabetes a lot these days, but in clinical trials, they are often given type 1 diabetes through an interventional chemical administration. It is notable that Dr. Faustman cured mice who had naturally occurring type 1 diabetes which is rooted in the autoimmune attack on the insulin-making beta cells. The BCG vaccine, or Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine, is about 100 years old and used around the world, though no longer in the United States, for the prevention of tuberculosis. It is being studied in various labs around the world due to its ability to spark the production of tumor necrosis factor, a hormone that kills disease-causing autoimmune cells. Without these bad autoimmune cells the pancreas’s beta-cell function may be theoretically restored. Dr. Faustman spoke frankly with me over the phone. She explained how in global studies, the effects of this treatment is being shown to occur in 2-3 years after treatment versus a few weeks. For example, promising results have been shown involving the BCG vaccine and another autoimmune disease–multiple sclerosis. Phase II of Trial in Process Dr. Faustman’s lab reported positive results from their Phase I study in 2012 and are now in Phase II of that study trying to repeat the tests with a larger number of participants. Phase II should be completed in 2023. Dr. Faustman said that the endpoint of this trial is unique because it is going to focus on the lo Continue reading >>

Bcg Vaccine - Can It Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus?

Bcg Vaccine - Can It Reverse Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus?

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of pancreatic islet cells , which are critical to glucose metabolism by producing insulin,by autoreactive T cells. These lymphocytes mistakenly attack pancreatic islet cells as if they were a foreign body, like a viral or bacterial infection. In addition, regulatory T-cells (which are often called Tregs) modulate the immune system and would generally reduce the effect of an autoimmune attack. Tregs act like brakes that normally prevent the mistaken attacks, like on the pancreatic islet cells, without affecting the whole immune system. A branch of diabetes research has suggested that Tregs could be the key to treating type 1 diabetes. Once the pancreatic islet cells are damaged, they no longer produce hormones, especially insulin , that help regulate the levels of blood glucose. Without insulin, the blood glucose levels increase rapidly leading to long-term damage to eyesight, kidneys, limbs, heart and other organs. In fact, type 1 diabetes can be deadly if the uncontrolled blood sugar leads to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis . Without regular insulin injections, a patient has little chance of living beyond a short period of time, and even then it could be a horrifically painful demise. It is not known what causes this autoimmune disease, although there is strong evidence that genetics is the most important factor. However, other things may be implicated, like vaccine-preventable diseases , which could be important co-factors in the development of the disease. Just to be clear, vaccines are not linked to type 1 diabetes . Currently, there are no known cures for type 1 diabetes. The only treatment for the disease are regular injections of human insulin, manufactured from g Continue reading >>

Old Generic Vaccine Shows Potential To Treat Diabetes

Old Generic Vaccine Shows Potential To Treat Diabetes

Old generic vaccine shows potential to treat diabetes Old generic vaccine shows potential to treat diabetes WEBVTT THESE PATIENTS ARE LOOKING FOR.DR. DENISE FAUSTMAN'S MODERN LABAT MASS GENERAL HOSPITAL ISrtFOCUSED ON AN OLD DRUG, AGENERIC VACCINE WITH POWERFULPOTENTIAL.>> BCG IS THE MOST COMMONVACCINE ADMINISTERED TO NEWBORNSrtIN THE WORLD FOR THE LAST100 YEARS TO TRY TO PREVENTTUBERCULOSIS INFECTIONS.EMILY: THE BCG OR BACILLUSrtCALMETTE-GUERIN VACCINE IS NOTGENERALLY RECOMMENDED FORCHILDREN IN THE U.S. BECAUSE OFTHE LOW RISK FOR TB INFECTIONHERE.rtYET, BCG COULD BE THE KEY FORPEOPLE WITH TYPE I DIABETES.BCG, THE YELLOrtW PARTICLE SEENHERE, CAN KILL BAD WHITE BLOODCELLS BEFORE THEY KILL THE GOODINSULIN RELEASING CELLS IN THEPANCREAS.rtRESEARCH SHOWS THE BCG VACCINEHELPS THE BODY PRODUCE A HORMONECALLED TNF.A HORMONE PEOPLE WITH TYPE IDIABETES NEED MORE OF.>> THOSE ELEVATED TNF LEVELS DOTWO GOOD THINGS.rtONE IS THEY INDUCE YOUR WHITEBLOOD CELLS TO PROLIFERATE THATARE THE GOOD WHITE BLOOD CELLS.rtON THE OTHER SIDE OF THEEQUATION, IT KILLS THE BADT-CELLS, SO IT'S RESETTING THEIMMUNE SYSTEM TO LOOK NORMALAGAIN.EMILY: DR. FAUSTMAN'S PHASE IrtPROMISING RESULTS.IN ADULTS WITH ADVANCED TYPE IDIABETES, BCG ELIMINATED THE BADWHITE BLOOD CELLS.rtAND ALSO TEMPORARILY HELPED THEBODY MAKE SMALL AMOUNTS OFINSULIN ON ITS OWN.THE NEXT STEP, A PHASE II TRIAL,IS UNDERWAY RIGHT NOW TO SEE IFrtREPEAT BCG INJECTIONS COULD PUTTHE DISEASE INTO REMISSION.>> MOVING SOMETHING FORWARD LIKETHIS COULDrt HAVE COME IN THESHORT TERM, A REALLY PRETTY BIGIMPACT ON HEALTHCARE COSTS INTHE UNITED STATES.EMILY:rt THAT PHASE TWO TRIAL WILLFOLLOW PARTICIPANTS OVER THENEXT SIX YEARS. Old generic vaccine shows potential to treat diabetes Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Does Not Mean Your Pancreas Is Dead! We’re Closer To A Cure With Bcg Vaccine

Type 1 Diabetes Does Not Mean Your Pancreas Is Dead! We’re Closer To A Cure With Bcg Vaccine

Send to Kindle My husband has Type 1 Diabetes, and we pay $400 out of pocket every month just for his insulin! I often hear sad stories of diabetics who have lost their limbs or gone blind. I also hear about young kids being diagnosed with the disease, and it makes me sick to my stomach. But, what if my husband, along with the other 1 million type 1 diabetics in the US could get a simple and inexpensive injection to jump start their pancreas? Dr. Denise L. Faustman, Director of the Immunobiology Laboratory of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), has been independently investigating using an 80 year old Tuberculosis vaccination, or BCG, known formally as bacillus Calmette-Guerin, to reverse type 1 diabetes. At first this sounded too good to be true and I hesitated because this potential cure would mean my husband would have to get vaccinations. If you read other articles I’ve written about the dangers of vaccination and the nasty ingredients they are made with, you may understand my hesitation. So, I decided to write to Faustman to ask her about this. I asked if there was a way she could recreate the vaccine to only use the ingredients necessary for the cure. She responded, Remarkably this is such an old vaccine, not much is added, unlike new vaccines. The other ingredients are sodium glutamate, magnesium sulphate, dipotassium phosphate, L-asparagine, ferric citrate, glycerol, citric acid, and water. This is basically salts with a little sugar, so no worries – no mercury, adjuvants, etc. The additives look like what is on the side of an energy drink. Right then I became more interested in the whole idea! Faustman has come a long way and has more than 20 years of research on autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes under her belt. She is very confident and enthusiastic that Continue reading >>

Can Tb Vaccine Stop Type 1 Diabetes?

Can Tb Vaccine Stop Type 1 Diabetes?

Maybe. A small clinical study found "proof of principle" that the BCG tuberculosis vaccine might help adults with long-standing type 1 diabetes. Over a decade ago, Denise Faustman, MD, PhD, and colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School showed that the BCG vaccine worked in diabetic mice. By stimulating positive immune responses, the vaccine stopped the haywire immune responses that cause diabetes. Once this happened, the animals' insulin-making cells regenerated. Other researchers duplicated the mouse studies. This led to "a lot of happy mice," Faustman says. But translating the findings to humans hasn't been easy. For starters, it required learning a lot more about the immune system and a lot more about type 1 diabetes. It didn't look promising. A 1999 study found no effect of BCG vaccination in kids newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. "When we started, there wasn't too much enthusiasm about trying to reverse diabetes in people 15 to 20 years out with this disease," Faustman tells WebMD. She persisted. "Surprisingly, our data was so good we got a signoff on doing a safety trial from the FDA," she says. "Even more surprising was that in this safety study, at a very low dose and after only two BCG vaccinations, we started seeing indications that this vaccine is doing the same thing in people as it does in the mouse." Hopeful Signs but No Lasting Effect In the study, six insulin-dependent adults with type 1 diabetes received either two doses of BCG or two fake vaccinations. The two groups were compared to one another, to 57 diabetes patients, and to 16 people without diabetes. In the three patients who received the vaccine: "Bad" anti-insulin T cells began dying off. New "good" regulatory T cells increased. There were signs of new, albeit t Continue reading >>

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Possible Cures For Type-1 In The News (december)

Here are some "bits and pieces" updates for December. Update on Dr. Faustman's Phase-II Trial of BCG Dr. Faustman's lab has published their Fall 2017 newsletter, which you can read here: This newsletter includes more information on her research, especially from the 3rd International BCG conference, The BCG Working Group, and the 2nd edition of the BCG and Autoimmunity book she edited. There are three pieces of new news there: The phase-II trial was fully enrolled in Summer of 2017. This is important because we now know when the trial will end. Since this is a five year study, they should finish collecting data in Summer of 2022 and publish before Summer of 2023. They have given BCG to the three untreated patients from their phase-I trial, so they will have data from six people to report in the future. The lab is going to be recruiting for more studies in the future, so would like to hear from anyone who is interested in participating. No details on future trials were provided. Another piece of news is that Dr. Faustman is branching out, and trying to apply BCG treatment to Fibromyalgia. This research is being done in collaboration with EpicGenetics, and they hope to start the trial in early 2018. If anything applicable to the type-1 world comes up in this research, I'll report it. Since Fibromyalgia is not generally considered an autoimmune disease, I'm not sure how much "cross pollination" of results there will be. You can read more about it here: DILfrequency Trial Completed There is a lot of research ongoing on IL-2 which is part of the immune system. About 18 months ago, I summarized all this research here: with an update here: One of those clinical trials was called "DILfrequency" and that trial has finished, and the results published. The purpose of that trial was Continue reading >>

Endocrine Society Reading Room | Type 1 Diabetes Vaccines Move Through Research Pipelines | Medpage Today

Endocrine Society Reading Room | Type 1 Diabetes Vaccines Move Through Research Pipelines | Medpage Today

Type 1 Diabetes Vaccines Move Through Research Pipelines Human trials for separate vaccines in U.S. and Europe, but still not ready for prime time This Reading Room is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: Justin B. Echouffo Tcheugui MD, PhD Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston, MA Type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease. The worldwide increase in its incidence has sparked research efforts geared toward developing interventions to prevent or halt the condition. Indeed, two separate vaccines for type 1 diabetes are being explored in human clinical trials. The two vaccinal options, including bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and an unnamed vaccine, are being tested in the US and Finland, respectively. At this stage, their therapeutic potential remains only putative. Although the BCG may possess curative and preventive potentials, its assessment has so far focused on its ability to reverse type 1 diabetes, including among those with long-standing disease. BCG acts by increasing the levels of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) protein, thus reducing the number of autoreactive T cells and increasing the so called good T cells or Tregs. The latter cells would then reset the immune system and thereby stopping beta cells destruction with a restoration of insulin production. The ongoing human trial of BCG is testing against placebo, the effect of two injections four weeks apart during the first year followed by one injection each year for the next four years. The unnamed vaccine aims at preventing type 1 diabetes. After being found to be effective and safe in mice, it is currently being tested in humans. Like the BCG, it also affects autoimmunity, but targets the coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1), an enterovirus linked to an increased risk of autoimmunity and known to destroys Continue reading >>

Research Spotlight A Vaccine For Type 1 Diabetes

Research Spotlight A Vaccine For Type 1 Diabetes

Research spotlight a vaccine for Type 1 diabetes Research spotlight a vaccine for Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes occurs when the bodys immune system, which normally protects against infection and illness, attacks cells in the pancreas that make insulin the hormone that regulates levels of glucose in the blood. Current treatments for Type 1 diabetes focus on replacing lost insulin, and provide an effective way to minimise life-threatening complications. However, they involve a lifetime of insulin injections or an insulin pump and don't treat the underlying 'autoimmune' attack. Research has shown that immunosuppressant drugs (similar to those used after an organ transplant) weaken the autoimmune attack that causes Type 1 diabetes, helping to prevent the destruction of insulin-producing cells and leading to short-term improvements in blood glucose control. Unfortunately, blanket suppression of the immune system as a whole also increases our vulnerability to infections, cancer and other potentially harmful side effects. In order to selectively target the 'bad' parts of the immune system, while leaving vital immune defences intact, scientists are working to understand Type 1 autoimmunity in great detail and are already testing more specific treatments. Scientists are searching for highly effective ways to control the immune system, known as 'immunotherapies'. If effective, these immunotherapies could be used to change the behaviour of the immune system and protect against Type 1 diabetes like a vaccine. This research could lead to ways to prevent Type 1 diabetes from developing in those at risk, and slow the progression of Type 1 diabetes in those already diagnosed. Diabetes UK is funding research to improve our understanding of the immune attack in Type 1 diabetes and fin Continue reading >>

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