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Bcaa Insulin Resistance

The Relationship Between Branched-chain Amino Acid Related Metabolomic Signature And Insulin Resistance: A Systematic Review

The Relationship Between Branched-chain Amino Acid Related Metabolomic Signature And Insulin Resistance: A Systematic Review

Copyright © 2016 Xue Zhao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Recent studies have shown the positive association between increased circulating BCAAs (valine, leucine, and isoleucine) and insulin resistance (IR) in obese or diabetic patients. However, results seem to be controversial in different races, diets, and distinct tissues. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between BCAA and IR as well as later diabetes risk and explore the phenotypic and genetic factors influencing BCAA level based on available studies. We performed systematic review, searching MEDLINE, EMASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception to March 2016. After selection, 23 studies including 20,091 participants were included. Based on current evidence, we found that BCAA is a useful biomarker for early detection of IR and later diabetic risk. Factors influencing BCAA level can be divided into four parts: race, gender, dietary patterns, and gene variants. These factors might not only contribute to the elevated BCAA level but also show obvious associations with insulin resistance. Genes related to BCAA catabolism might serve as potential targets for the treatment of IR associated metabolic disorders. Moreover, these factors should be controlled properly during study design and data analysis. In the future, more large-scale studies with elaborate design addressing BCAA and IR are required. 1. Introduction Obesity, one of the escalating global health problems, is a major risk factor for the onset and development of diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, cancer, and other Continue reading >>

Branched Chain Amino Acids Are Associated With Insulin Resistance Independent Of Leptin And Adiponectin In Subjects With Varying Degrees Of Glucose Tolerance.

Branched Chain Amino Acids Are Associated With Insulin Resistance Independent Of Leptin And Adiponectin In Subjects With Varying Degrees Of Glucose Tolerance.

2 Department of Endocrinology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen , Groningen, the Netherlands . Branched chain amino acids (BCAA) may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and are associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) development. Adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin influence insulin resistance and reflect adipocyte dysfunction. We examined the extent to which the association of BCAA with insulin resistance is attributable to altered leptin and adiponectin levels in individuals with varying degrees of glucose tolerance. BCAA were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, whereas leptin and adiponectin were measured by immunoassay, in subjects with normal fasting glucose (n = 30), impaired fasting glucose (n = 25), and T2DM (n = 15). Insulin resistance was estimated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMAir). BCAA were higher in men than in women (P < 0.001) and tended to be higher in T2DM subjects (P = 0.10) compared to subjects with normal or impaired fasting glucose. In univariate regression analysis, BCAA were correlated with HOMAir (r = 0.46; P < 0.001) and inversely with adiponectin (r = -0.53; P < 0.001) but not with leptin (r = -0.08; P > 0.05). Multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, T2DM, and body mass index (BMI), demonstrated that BCAA were positively associated with HOMAir ( = 0.242, P = 0.023). When BCAA, leptin, and adiponectin were included together, the positive relationship of HOMAir with BCAA ( = 0.275, P = 0.012) remained significant. Insulin resistance was associated with BCAA. This association remained after adjusting for age, sex, T2DM, BMI, as well as leptin and adiponectin. It is unlikely that the relationship of insulin resistance with BCAA is to a major extent att Continue reading >>

Branched-chain Amino Acid Restriction In Zucker-fatty Rats Improves Muscle Insulin Sensitivity By Enhancing Efficiency Of Fatty Acid Oxidation And Acyl-glycine Export - Sciencedirect

Branched-chain Amino Acid Restriction In Zucker-fatty Rats Improves Muscle Insulin Sensitivity By Enhancing Efficiency Of Fatty Acid Oxidation And Acyl-glycine Export - Sciencedirect

Volume 5, Issue 7 , July 2016, Pages 538-551 Branched-chain amino acid restriction in Zucker-fatty rats improves muscle insulin sensitivity by enhancing efficiency of fatty acid oxidation and acyl-glycine export Feeding a BCAA restricted diet improves skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in Zucker fatty rats. BCKDH activity is decreased in liver and increased in skeletal muscle in Zucker fatty versus lean rats. High BCAA levels drive the obesity-associated decline in circulating and muscle glycine levels. BCAA-driven glycine depletion restricts formation of acyl-glycine adducts for excretion in urine. High BCAA/low glycine reduces efficiency of fat oxidation in muscle leading to acyl CoA buildup. A branched-chain amino acid (BCAA)-related metabolic signature is strongly associated with insulin resistance and predictive of incident diabetes and intervention outcomes. To better understand the role that this metabolite cluster plays in obesity-related metabolic dysfunction, we studied the impact of BCAA restriction in a rodent model of obesity in which BCAA metabolism is perturbed in ways that mirror the human condition. Zucker-lean rats (ZLR) and Zucker-fatty rats (ZFR) were fed either a custom control, low fat (LF) diet, or an isonitrogenous, isocaloric LF diet in which all three BCAA (Leu, Ile, Val) were reduced by 45% (LF-RES). We performed comprehensive metabolic and physiologic profiling to characterize the effects of BCAA restriction on energy balance, insulin sensitivity, and glucose, lipid and amino acid metabolism. LF-fed ZFR had higher levels of circulating BCAA and lower levels of glycine compared to LF-fed ZLR. Feeding ZFR with the LF-RES diet lowered circulating BCAA to levels found in LF-fed ZLR. Activity of the rate limiting enzyme in the BCAA catabolic pat Continue reading >>

Researchers Identify Cause Of Insulin Resistance In Type 2 Diabetics

Researchers Identify Cause Of Insulin Resistance In Type 2 Diabetics

Researchers identify cause of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetics March 7, 2016, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Blood glucose monitoring. Credit: Wikipedia More than 29 million Americans are currently living with diabetes. The majority have type 2 diabetes, and for them insulin resistance - their body's inability to effectively process sugar - is a part of daily life. Therefore, understanding the cause of insulin resistance is critical to tackling this chronic disease. A new link between high levels of certain amino acids and type 2 diabetes was found by a team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, using mouse and human muscle and blood samples to evaluate the mechanisms that lead to insulin resistance. The findings of this study appear online in Nature Medicine ahead of the print issue. For people with type 2 diabetes , the problem of insulin resistance means there is plenty of insulin but the body does not respond to it effectively. While most people associate this resistance with sugar levels in the blood, diabetes is also a problem with excess fat, especially too much fat inside skeletal muscle, which leads to the insulin resistance. If the level of fat in muscles can be reduced then, theoretically, insulin resistance can be prevented, surmise investigators. "This research sought to answer a few large questions," said senior author Zoltan Arany, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Cardiovascular Medicine. "How does fat get into skeletal muscle? And how is the elevation of certain amino acids in people with diabetes related to insulin resistance? We have appreciated for over ten years that diabetes is accompanied by elevations in the blood of branched-chain amino acids, which humans can only obtai Continue reading >>

Interplay Between Lipids And Branched-chain Amino Acids In Development Of Insulin Resistance

Interplay Between Lipids And Branched-chain Amino Acids In Development Of Insulin Resistance

Interplay between lipids and branched-chain amino acids in development of insulin resistance Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Departments of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27704 Christopher B. Newgard, Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Departments of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27704; Correspondence: Christopher B. Newgard, PhD, Director, Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center, W. David and Sarah W. Stedman Distinguished Professor, Duke University Medical Center, Duke Independence Park Facility, 4321 Medical Park Drive, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27704, Phone: (919) 668-6059, [email protected] , FAX: (919) 477-0632 The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Cell Metab See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Fatty acids (FA) and FA-derived metabolites have long been implicated in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, application of metabolomics technologies has revealed that branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and related metabolites are more strongly associated with insulin resistance than many common lipid species. Moreover, the BCAA-related signature is predictive of incident diabetes and intervention outcomes, and uniquely responsive to therapeutic interventions. Nevertheless, in animal feeding studies, BCAA supplementation requires the background of a high-fat diet to promote insulin resistance. This article develops a model to explain how lipids and BCAA may synergize to promote metabolic diseases. The pandemic of obesity that burdens the world population is well documented. In the United States, more than 65% of adults are charac Continue reading >>

5 Benefits Of Bcaas For Strength And Recovery

5 Benefits Of Bcaas For Strength And Recovery

Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are now one of the most popular supplements around, earning a place in millions of homes and gyms, worldwide. Numerous studies show a direct link between BCAA intake and improved strength and recovery, fuelling sales growth which shows no sign of slowing. Whether you are a keen runner, professional tennis player, amateur weightlifter or an Olympic gold medallist, you could certainly benefit from adding more BCAAs to your diet. Evidence supports the use of BCAA supplementation for strength and recovery during exercise but also recognizes their role in some diseases, such as cancer. Other studies have also linked bloodstream levels of BCAAs to insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. In this article, well go over the main benefits of BCAAs for strength and recovery and why you should consider adding them to your diet. When we talk about protein, we are referring to amino acid residue which is what protein is made from. BCAAs are essential amino acids because the body is unable to synthesize them on its own, therefore, they must be consumed in our diet. Of the nine essential amino acids, three of them fall into the BCAA category. They are: Leucine boosts protein synthesis, helping build and repair muscle. It also assists with insulin to regulate blood sugars and is one of only two amino acids which cannot be converted into sugar. Isoleucine enables energy to be stored in muscle cells rather than fat cells by regulating glucose uptake. Valine improves mental functioning, reduces fatigue and prevents muscle breakdown. Other essential amino acids are oxidized (broken down to release energy) in the liver, however, BCAAs are unique in that they can be metabolized in muscle. Why is this important? Well, the body needs BCAAs in the bloodstream t Continue reading >>

Bcaa Metabolism And Insulin Sensitivity - Dysregulated By Metabolic Status?

Bcaa Metabolism And Insulin Sensitivity - Dysregulated By Metabolic Status?

Department of Exercise Science, High Point University, High Point, NC. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) appear to influence several synthetic and catabolic cellular signaling cascades leading to altered phenotypes in mammals. BCAAs are most notably known to increase protein synthesis through modulating protein translation, explaining their appeal to resistance and endurance athletes for muscle hypertrophy, expedited recovery, and preservation of lean body mass. In addition to anabolic effects, BCAAs may increase mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle and adipocytes, possibly enhancing oxidative capacity. However, elevated circulating BCAA levels have been correlated with severity of insulin resistance. It is hypothesized that elevated circulating BCAAs observed in insulin resistance may result from dysregulated BCAA degradation. This review summarizes original reports that investigated the ability of BCAAs to alter glucose uptake in consequential cell types and experimental models. The review also discusses the interplay of BCAAs with other metabolic factors, and the role of excess lipid (and possibly energy excess) in the dysregulation of BCAA catabolism. Lastly, this article provides a working hypothesis of the mechanism(s) by which lipids may contribute to altered BCAA catabolism, which often accompanies metabolic disease. homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance; isoleucine; leucine; type 2 diabetes; valine Continue reading >>

Bcaas, Insulin And Bloodsugar

Bcaas, Insulin And Bloodsugar

Speaker, Author, Gentleman, Entrepreneur and founder of Physique Formula All Natural Supplements & Shimbos Organic Food Do BCAAS raise your insulin levels? Can you use branched chain amino acids without spiking your blood sugar? These are just two of the common questions that I receive from athletes, bodybuilders and hard training athletes who want to know if using a BCAA supplement is going to knock them out of ketosis or give them high blood sugar levels. Jimmy Smith,MS,CSCS is the president of The Physique Formula, an all natural supplement company. Use code medium20 at checkout to save 20% on all supplements including bcaas with stevia at And the answer is NO. Im not sure where all the confusion started honestly but Im here to point out the science. This 2016 paper , The Emerging Role of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Insulin Resistance and Metabolism, points out how BCAA can act as a therapeutic agent for IMPROVING insulin resistance. Thats right, not only do BCAAS not raise blood sugar or insulin levels but they actually help LOWER insulin. The first phase happens as you CHEW or DRINK your food. Its almost instant and is a short phase insulin response to the incoming nutrients that your gut is going to digest. This instant response comes then quickly exits the body. The second phase is where the problem starts. This is what we typically think when we talk about carbs, body fat and insulin. So what are the roles of BCAAS ? BCAAS only result in that first insulin response which is merely a signal to your gut to get ready to digest food. There is NO negative insulin response to BCAAS. BCAAS are safe to be consumed on a ketogenic diet,it will keep you in ketosis. There is even emerging evidence that shows that BCAAS, particularly leucine, may even help ketone bodies g Continue reading >>

Higher Concentrations Of Bcaas And 3-hib Are Associated With Insulin Resistance In The Transition From Gestational Diabetes To Type 2 Diabetes

Higher Concentrations Of Bcaas And 3-hib Are Associated With Insulin Resistance In The Transition From Gestational Diabetes To Type 2 Diabetes

Higher Concentrations of BCAAs and 3-HIB Are Associated with Insulin Resistance in the Transition from Gestational Diabetes to Type 2 Diabetes 1Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden 2Swedish NMR Centre, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Correspondence should be addressed to Ulrika Andersson-Hall ; [email protected] Received 9 March 2018; Accepted 7 May 2018; Published 5 June 2018 Copyright 2018 Ulrika Andersson-Hall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Aim. Determine the metabolic profile and identify risk factors of women transitioning from gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods. 237 women diagnosed with GDM underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), anthropometrics assessment, and completed lifestyle questionnaires six years after pregnancy. Blood was analysed for clinical variables (e.g., insulin, glucose, HbA1c, adiponectin, leptin, and lipid levels) and NMR metabolomics. Based on the OGTT, women were divided into three groups: normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and T2DM. Results. Six years after GDM, 19% of subjects had T2DM and 19% IGT. After BMI adjustment, the IGT group had lower HDL, higher leptin, and higher free fatty acid (FFA) levels, and the T2DM group higher triglyceride, FFA, and C-reactive protein levels than the NGT group. IGT and T2DM groups reported lower physical activity. NMR measurements revealed that levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and the valine metabolite 3-hydroxyisobyturate were h Continue reading >>

Do Bcaas Raise Blood Sugar?|bcaas, Keto, Insulin

Do Bcaas Raise Blood Sugar?|bcaas, Keto, Insulin

Do BCAAS Raise Blood Sugar?|BCAAS, Keto, Insulin A lot of low carb, paleo or ketogenic dieters are often concerned that BCAAS may raise blood sugar. No, BCAAS do NOT raise blood sugar or spike insulin. Can you use BCAAS during a fast? Yes you can and allow me to tell you why. Amino acids are either defined as glucogenic or ketogenic based on a fancy metabolic cycle knows as the Krebs cycle. Glucogenic refers to the metabolic pathway that leads to the creation of new glucose from non-carbohydrate foods Ketogenic refers to amino acids that are directly taking into the acetyl-CoA cycle. What does this have to do with branched chain amino acids and your blood sugar? Everything. Of the three BCAAs only one,valine,is gluconeogenic. Leucine is purely ketogenic and isoleucine is partially ketogenic and gluconeogenic. The Physique Formula BCAAS are in a 2:1:1 ratio, leucine, isoleucine and valine. If we scored each BCAA by amount and type (ketogenic or glucogenic) then we clearly see that BCAAS are more KETOGENIC and do NOT raise blood sugar. Lets say you decide to have a big bowl of pasta, As the white bread raises your blood glucose, your pancreas releases insulin in the first transient, SHORT TERM, phase followed by a longer second phase. People with type II diabetes for example, show issues with this release pattern ( study ). Branched chain amino acids, if they cause any insulin spike at all, will only result in the first transient increase. Your body can and will clear whatever any amount of insulin that is released. Still, no long spike in your blood sugar. Could it be that BCAAS have more metabolic benefits? Why yes it does. BCAAs control hormone release in the GI tract and in fat deposits. BCAAs also enhance glucagon peptide-1 (GLP-1 ) which is a satiety mechanism invo Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance, And What May Contribute To It

Insulin Resistance, And What May Contribute To It

Shutterstock Insulin resistance is an abnormal response to insulin produced either by the pancreas or given as an injection, as evidenced by blood glucose levels in relation to serum insulin. Previous evidence supports the connection between branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and the development of insulin resistance. In a study published in Nature Medicine, scientists have discovered that 3-hydroxyisobutyrate (3-HIB), one of the intermediate products in the breakdown of the BCAA valine, plays a role in the transport of fatty acids into skeletal muscle cells, which creates fatty muscles — a contributor to insulin resistance. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins – there are 20 of them all together. There are nine essential amino acids which cannot be made by the body — three of them are BCAAs, leucine, isoleucine, and valine – which account for 35 percent of the essential amino acids in muscle proteins and 40 percent of the preformed amino acids required by mammals. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids result. The human body uses amino acids to make proteins to help the body: Break down food Grow Repair body tissue Perform many other body functions Amino acids can also be used as a source of energy — but that's not typical. BCAA have profoundly altered metabolism in insulin resistant conditions or situations where there is insulin deficiency – and it is only recently that their role has been so closely associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a major pathological feature in individuals with Type-2 diabetes (T2DM) or part of what is known as the metabolic syndrome — an association between abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease (T2DM is considered a cardiovascular disease equivalent), high bl Continue reading >>

The Emerging Role Of Branched-chain Amino Acids In Insulin Resistance And Metabolism.

The Emerging Role Of Branched-chain Amino Acids In Insulin Resistance And Metabolism.

Nutrients. 2016 Jul 1;8(7). pii: E405. doi: 10.3390/nu8070405. The Emerging Role of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Insulin Resistance and Metabolism. Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon 406-840, Korea. [email protected] Insulin is required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite the importance of insulin sensitivity to metabolic health, the mechanisms that induce insulin resistance remain unclear. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) belong to the essential amino acids, which are both direct and indirect nutrient signals. Even though BCAAs have been reported to improve metabolic health, an increased BCAA plasma level is associated with a high risk of metabolic disorder and future insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) by BCAAs has been suggested to cause insulin resistance. In addition, defective BCAA oxidative metabolism might occur in obesity, leading to a further accumulation of BCAAs and toxic intermediates. This review provides the current understanding of the mechanism of BCAA-induced mTORC1 activation, as well as the effect of mTOR activation on metabolic health in terms of insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the effects of impaired BCAA metabolism will be discussed in detail. branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs); insulin resistance; mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1); metabolism Continue reading >>

(pdf) Insulin Resistance And The Metabolism Of Branched-chain Amino Acids In Humans

(pdf) Insulin Resistance And The Metabolism Of Branched-chain Amino Acids In Humans

Received: 6 April 2011 / Accepted: 15 September 2011 Abstract Peripheral resistance to insulin action is the major mechanism causing the metabolic syndrome and eventually type 2 diabetes mellitus. The metabolic derangement asso- ciated with insulin resistance is extensive and not restricted to carbohydrates. The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are particularly responsive to the inhibitory insulin action on amino acid release by skeletal muscle andtheir metabolism is profoundly altered in conditions featuring insulin resistance, insulin deciency, or both. Obesity, the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus display a gradual increase in the plasma concentration of BCAAs, from the obesity-related low-grade insulin-resistant state to the severe deciency of insulin action in diabetes ketoacidosis. Obesity-associated hyperin- sulinemia succeeds in maintaining near-normal or slightly elevated plasma concentrationof BCAAs, despite the insulin- resistant state. The low circulating levels of insulin and/or the deeper insulin resistance occurring in diabetes mellitus are associated with more marked elevation in the plasma con- centration of BCAAs. In diabetes ketoacidosis, the increase in plasma BCAAs is striking, returning to normal when ade- quate metabolic control is achieved. The metabolism of BCAAs is also disturbed in other situations typically featuring insulin resistance, including kidney and liver dys- function. However, notwithstanding the insulin-resistant state, the plasma level of BCAAs in these conditions is lower than in healthy subjects, suggesting that these organs are involved in maintaining BCAAs blood concentration. The pathogenesis of the decreased BCAAs plasma level in kidney and liver dysfunction is unclear, but a decreased afux of these amino acids in Continue reading >>

Bcaa Benefits And Side Effects

Bcaa Benefits And Side Effects

CLICK HERE TO ORDER AML'S POST-WORKOUT TODAY! 1. Blomstrand, E., Eliasson, J., Karlsson, H.K., and Kohnke, R. (2006). Branched-chain amino acids activate key enzymes in protein synthesis after physical exercise. J Nutr 136, 269S-273S. 2. Shimomura, Y., Yamamoto, Y., Bajotto, G., Sato, J., Murakami, T., Shimomura, N., Kobayashi, H., and Mawatari, K. (2006). Nutraceutical effects of branched-chain amino acids on skeletal muscle. J Nutr 136, 529S-532S. 3. Newgard, C.B., An, J., Bain, J.R., Muehlbauer, M.J., Stevens, R.D., Lien, L.F., Haqq, A.M., Shah, S.H., Arlotto, M., Slentz, C.A., Rochon, J., Gallup, D., Ilkayeva, O., Wenner, B.R., Yancy, W.S., Jr., Eisenson, H., Musante, G., Surwit, R.S., Millington, D.S., Butler, M.D., and Svetkey, L.P. (2009). A branched-chain amino acid-related metabolic signature that differentiates obese and lean humans and contributes to insulin resistance. Cell Metab 9, 311-326. 4. Walker, D.K., Dickinson, J.M., Timmerman, K.L., Drummond, M.J., Reidy, P.T., Fry, C.S., Gundermann, D.M., and Rasmussen, B.B. (2011). Exercise, amino acids, and aging in the control of human muscle protein synthesis. Med Sci Sports Exerc 43, 2249-2258. 5. Pasiakos, S.M., McClung, H.L., McClung, J.P., Margolis, L.M., Andersen, N.E., Cloutier, G.J., Pikosky, M.A., Rood, J.C., Fielding, R.A., and Young, A.J. (2011). Leucine-enriched essential amino acid supplementation during moderate steady state exercise enhances postexercise muscle protein synthesis. Am J Clin Nutr 94, 809-818. 6. Manders, R.J., Koopman, R., Beelen, M., Gijsen, A.P., Wodzig, W.K., Saris, W.H., and van Loon, L.J. (2008). The muscle protein synthetic response to carbohydrate and protein ingestion is not impaired in men with longstanding type 2 diabetes. J Nutr 138, 1079-1085. 7. Doi, M., Yamaoka, I., N Continue reading >>

Most Recent Papers With The Keyword Bcaa & Insulin Resistance | Read By Qxmd

Most Recent Papers With The Keyword Bcaa & Insulin Resistance | Read By Qxmd

Comprehensive Assessment of the Effects of Sleeve Gastrectomy on Glucose, Lipid, and Amino Acid Metabolism in Asian Individuals with Morbid Obesity. Jie Yao, Jean-Paul Kovalik, Oi Fah Lai, Phong Ching Lee, Alvin Eng, Weng Hoong Chan, Kwang Wei Tham, Eugene Lim, Yong Mong Bee, Hong Chang Tan BACKGROUND: Obesity-induced insulin resistance leads to abnormalities in glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolism. Our study examined the differences in insulin-mediated glucose, amino acid, and lipid metabolism between morbidly obese subjects with non-obese controls and the associated changes following sleeve gastrectomy (SG). METHODS: Non-obese controls and individuals with morbid obesity and scheduled for SG were recruited. Metabolic assessments were performed for all subjects at baseline and at 6months after SG for eight subjects... Branched-chain amino acids in liver diseases. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are involved in various bioprocess such as protein metabolism, gene expression, insulin resistance and proliferation of hepatocytes. BCAAs have also been reported to suppress the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells in vitro and to be required for immune cells to perform the function. In advanced cirrhotic patients, it has been clarified that serum concentrations of BCAA are decreased, whereas those of aromatic amino acids (AAAs) are increased. These alterations are thought to be the causes of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), sarcopenia and hepatocarcinogenesis and may be associated with the poor prognosis of patients with these conditions... Cardiac Branched-Chain Amino Acid Oxidation is Reduced During Insulin Resistance in the Heart. Natasha Fillmore, Cory S Wagg, Liyan Zhang, Arata Fukushima, Gary D Lopaschuk Recent studies have proposed that elevated branched- Continue reading >>

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