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Barley Porridge For Diabetes

Why Barley Makes The Best Breakfast

Why Barley Makes The Best Breakfast

Move over, wheat toast, and make room for humble barley: This soft, spherical comfort food can keep your blood sugar 20 to 30 percent lower than other morning grains like the whole wheat in toast for up to ten hours, Swedish researchers have found. In a related study, even-keeled blood sugar resulted in better short-term memory and stronger powers of concentration, says author Anne Nilsson, PhD, of Lund University. "Slow-release carbohydrates such as beta-glucan mean barley is digested very slowly," Nilsson notes. The indigestible fiber in and around barley kernels lingers, making you feel full and yielding another bonus: lower levels of the blood fats that raise the risk for diabetes and heart disease. Nilsson's breakfast club ate minimally processed "hulled" barley, a type available in some health food stores and online. Researchers aren't sure whether pearl barley or fast-cooking rolled barley flakes pack the same benefits, but they might: The beta-glucans are present throughout the grain, not just in the layers removed by processing. If you're looking for easy, delicious recipes for breakfast barley, Minneapolis chef Robin Asbell, author of The New Whole Grains Cookbook, suggests starting out by cooking it overnight in a slow cooker so it's ready for you in the morning. For pearl barley, use a one-to-four grain-to-water ratio; hulled barley, use four and a half cups of water for every cup of grain. Set the cooker on low when you go to bed, and eight hours later the barley will be ready. Then, she suggests, eat it for breakfast like this: Sweet barley porridge: Toss in orange zest, dried cherries, or your favorite dried fruit. Sprinkle spices like cinnamon, ground clove, nutmeg, and allspice into the slow cooker at night, or add in the morning, with skim milk, yogur Continue reading >>

10 Best Benefits Of Barley

10 Best Benefits Of Barley

If you are having a difficult time suffering from medical conditions like hypertension, arthritis , asthma , impotence, skin problems, anemia , obesity, constipation , diabetes , kidney problems or heart diseases, perhaps its time for you to learn about the health benefits of barley. The benefits are mostly attributed to the eight essential amino acids which it contains, meaning that it represents the complete protein requirement in our diet.Recent research says that consuming whole grain barley also regulates blood sugar to a great extent. There are so many rampant ailments occurring in recent years, which prove that even our regular diet lacks important nutrients. One of the most important nutrients that we often tend to neglect is fiber . Barley is an excellent source of both soluble and insoluble fiber, which assures you good overall health in the long term. Before we move on to the health benefits, you will be pleased to know that you can consume itin many kinds of preparations like salads, soups, stew, and even with chicken , mutton or in the tandoori style. Therefore, it does not add value just to your health but also to your palate. Barley is used for skin care, boosting immunity, and preventing disorders such as osteoporosis , gallstones , and diabetes. Let us look at the common benefits in detail: Barley, being an excellent source of fiber, keeps your body toxin-free. Itsgrass, which is rich in dietary fiber, acts as a fuel source to the friendly bacteria in our large intestine. These bacteria help in fermenting the fiber content of barley, thereby forming butyric acid, which is the primary fuel for intestinal cells. Itis greatly effective in maintaining a healthy colon. By keeping the intestine in proper health, ithelps you decrease the movement time of fece Continue reading >>

Pearl Barley - The Blood Sugar Diet By Michael Mosley

Pearl Barley - The Blood Sugar Diet By Michael Mosley

You are here: Home Forums Fast 800 Pearl Barley I saw a TV chef make a pearl barley risotto this morning and thought it sounded like a good alternative to rice. However, my research has thrown up so many different views. It is supposed to be the lowest GI grain ever at 22, but someone said when it is cooked it goes up to 66. Should I treat it like oats and only have it occasionally or should I avoid it all together. Wow, hadnt heard that! Pretty sure MM recommends pearl barley in the book as one that is ok. I bought a packet, then saw that it takes bloomin ages to cook so havent bothered! I made beef barley soup with it, but we just need to watch the carbs. It is not very low since it is a grain. From MyFitnessPal 35 grams of pearl barley (sounds like a portion to me, not an expert) is 120 cals but 27 carbs. If youre trying to restrict your carbs to under 50g per day to drive weight loss that is quite a lot. So I think that LACali21 is probably right, you should perhaps swerve the pearl barley unless you plan it in carefully. I will give it a miss for now and stick to lentils, Thanks guys You may want to watch the lentil intake too sunshine-girl. According to MyFitnessPal 1 cup is 230 cals and 40 g carbs. I only use any pulse as an addition to a dish, not a full serving. But Im trying to keep my carbs down to promote faster weight loss. I dont know why I said lentils as I havent had any except within this diet, eat more chickpeas, legumes and beans. Sometimes put some in with mince to pad out a bolognaise but I do have Michaels chicken on lentilsm had it twice in 4 weeks so not a staple in my diet, thanks for the heads up lac. Best sort of barley to use is pot barley it is unprocessed unlike pearl barley, can take a bit longer to prepare but you can make a good amount Continue reading >>

Barley Benefits: How It Could Help Reduce Blood Sugar Level

Barley Benefits: How It Could Help Reduce Blood Sugar Level

Barley Benefits: How It Could Help Reduce Blood Sugar Level Barley Benefits: How It Could Help Reduce Blood Sugar Level NDTV Food | Updated: February 10, 2016 15:27 IST Barley , the ancient grain, may not score as high compared to the popularity of other grains, but its health benefits are aplenty. It is not without reason considered to be a superfood. For years it has been used by many communities to make breads and porridge to savour the essential nutrients. A recent study done by Lund University in Sweden states that eating a special mixture of dietary fibres found in barley can help reduce appetite and blood sugar levels. According to the researchers, barley can also rapidly improve people's health by reducing risk for cardiovascular disease. "It is surprising yet promising that choosing the right blend of dietary fibres can -- in a short period of time -- generate such remarkable health benefits," said Anne Nilsson from Lund University. The study was conducted with healthy middle-aged participants who were asked to eat bread largely made out of barley kernels (up to 85 percent) for three days -- at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Approximately 11-14 hours after their final meal of the day, participants were examined for risk indicators of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The researchers found that the participants' metabolism improved for up to 14 hours, with additional benefits such as decreases in blood sugar and insulin levels , increases in insulin sensitivity and improved appetite control. The effects arise when the special mixture of dietary fibres in barley kernel reaches the gut, stimulating the increase of good bacteria and the release of important hormones , the researchers said. "After eating the bread made out of barley kernel, we saw an increase in g Continue reading >>

The New Nordic Diet: A Healthful Way Of Eating

The New Nordic Diet: A Healthful Way Of Eating

Home Email Daily Updates - Articles The New Nordic Diet: A Healthful Way of Eating The New Nordic Diet: A Healthful Way of Eating Theres a new eating plan in town and it focuses on foods commonly eaten in Scandinavian countries. Its called the New Nordic Diet, or Nordic Diet for short. Read on to learn how this eating plan can benefit your health. The Nordic Diet focuses on eating food found in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland, the countries collectively known as Scandinavia. You might only know the cuisine of these countries from the caf at your local Ikea, But the Nordic Diet has been around since 2004, thanks to nutrition and cooking experts who were interested in helping people in those countries eat more healthfully. Like the Mediterranean Diet, the Nordic Diet is an approach to eating rather than rigid guidelines to follow. The following foods are part of the Nordic Diet: Root vegetables, such as turnips, beets, carrots, potatoes Cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower Leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, Swiss chard Beans and legumes such as brown beans, split peas Berries, such as lingonberries, bilberries Other plant foods, such as seaweed, moss, mushrooms, nettles Along with these ingredients, a big part of the Nordic Diet is choosing organic versions when possible, eating responsibly caught fish, limiting processed and packaged foods, and purchasing local and seasonal foods. Examples of meals that are part of the Nordic Diet You might be scratching your head as to exactly how to eat elk meat. It may be helpful to refer to a cookbook or search the Internet for meal ideas and recipes. Some examples of what you might eat include: Oat or barley porridge mixed with berries and organic milk Seaweed or kale pesto served over new p Continue reading >>

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Eaten as a staple food across many parts of the world, grains exist in our diets in many forms, offering an important source of energy. It’s common knowledge that whole grains are good for us, from rice and wheat, to barley and quinoa. Much of the nutrient goodness of grains are found in the bran and germ of the seed, which is why it’s important to eat grains without these parts being milled off first – this is what the term ‘whole grain’ refers to. Grains in your diet Whole grains are wonderfully versatile – add them to salads for texture, bulk up a soup or stew, blend them in burgers or use directly as a meat alternative, or combine them whole in baked goods. They aren’t hard to include in your everyday eating routine and a little whole grain goes a long way! Packed with nutrients What do wholegrains contain? Fibre B vitamins Folic acid Essential fatty acids Protein Antioxidants Micro-nutrients Cooking with grains Cooking most grains is very similar to cooking rice – simply add the dry grain to a pan of water or broth, bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer until the liquid has been absorbed. For a healthy boost of nutrients,experiment with different grains in different forms to bring variety to your meals. Which grain to choose? Amaranth With roughly 60 varieties in total, amaranth is not technically a grain but is of similar nutrition value and usage. These tiny grains have a slightly peppery flavour and can be cooked in water, popped like corn or added to baked goods to increase protein content. Barley For those seeking high fibre, you don’t get much better than barley. Often found as a flour, barley makes a closely textured bread with a slightly sweet flavour. Buckwheat Related to rhubarb, buckwheat is also not a grain as such, but i Continue reading >>

Barley Groat, Barley Porridge In Diabetes Mellitus

Barley Groat, Barley Porridge In Diabetes Mellitus

Barley groat, barley porridge in diabetes mellitus It is surprising, but You can find a lot of people do not even realize that barley porridge is practically the same cereal , derivative of barley. They differ only in the way of preparation. Pearl barley is nothing else then a polished grain of selected barley grains and barley is unpolished particles milled barley kernels, too selective. Unfortunately, in our time, these cereals are not very popular. However, it is the oldest barley cereal, which was for our ancestors, the main food - and porridge and bread, and drink. This plant has all necessary for human nutrition biologically active substances. According to the content of vitamins, minerals selection, number of enzymes and slowly digestible carbohydrates barley is the champion of champions in these categories. Undeservedly forgotten by us barley porridge contains all the useful qualities of barley, and in addition, a record amount of fiber, among other grains. Because of this barley porridge is much slower digested by stomach, which helps cleanse the this organ. Simple barley, pearl barley, and barley porridge has long been used in folk medicine. These broths have antispasmodic, anti-tonic effect, their use in the treatment of many diseases. Especially barley use is successfully used in case of presence of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is a disease , in which primarily affected the exchange of water and carbohydrates in the body. As a result, diabetics often have disorders in protein and fat metabolism, so they preferred plant food that contains a lot of fiber and few easily digestible carbohydrates. The most effective way to maintain proper blood sugar levels on normal level and prevent the complications of diabetes is observance of plan of healthy eating. Doctors Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

Barley: Health Benefits, Nutrition, Diet, And Risks

Barley: Health Benefits, Nutrition, Diet, And Risks

Barley is a major cereal grain, commonly found in bread, beverages, and various cuisines of every culture. One of the first cultivated grains in history, it remains one of the most widely consumed grains, globally. Barley and other whole grain foods have rapidly been gaining popularity over the past few years due to the various health benefits they can offer. Whole grains are important sources of dietary fiber, vitamins , and minerals that are not found in refined or "enriched" grains. Refining grains removes the bran, germ, and most of their fiber and nutrients. Choosing whole grains over their processed counterparts can help reduce the risk of obesity , diabetes , heart disease , cancer , and other chronic health problems. Here are some key points about barley. More detail is in the main article. Consuming barley might have benefits for the heart, blood pressure , and bones Barley may be useful in maintaining a healthy weight Barley provides a high percentage of an individual's daily requirement of manganese and selenium Thanks to barley's versatility, it is easy to incorporate into meals Barley contains important nutrients that can offer a range of health benefits. Pearl barley is by far the most popular form of barley in the US. Maintaining a low sodium intake is essential to lowering blood pressure, but increasing potassium intake may be just as important. According to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), fewer than 2 percent of American adults meet the daily 4,700-milligram recommendation. Also, potassium, calcium , and magnesium , which are all present in barley, have been found to decrease blood pressure naturally. A study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association in 2006 concluded that: "In a healthful diet, increa Continue reading >>

The Wonders Of Barley

The Wonders Of Barley

D.D. Family pre-diabetic for type 2 as of 3/08, no meds Does anyone eat barley on a regular basis? I just started to eat it in lieu of potatoes and rice. Here is an informative article about barley......................... Barley and Other Whole Grains Substantially Lower Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Barley and other whole grains are a rich source of magnesium, a mineral that acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including enzymes involved in the body's use of glucose and insulin secretion. The FDA permits foods that contain at least 51% whole grains by weight (and are also low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol) to display a health claim stating consumption is linked to lower risk of heart disease and certain cancers. Now, research suggests regular consumption of whole grains also reduces risk of type 2 diabetes. (van Dam RM, Hu FB, Diabetes Care). In this 8-year trial, involving 41,186 particpants of the Black Women's Health Study, research data confirmed inverse associations between magnesium, calcium and major food sources in relation to type 2 diabetes that had already been reported in predominantly white populations. Risk of type 2 diabetes was 31% lower in black women who frequently ate whole grains compared to those eating the least of these magnesium-rich foods. When the women's dietary intake of magnesium intake was considered by itself, a beneficial, but lesser- 19%- reduction in risk of type 2 diabetes was found, indicating that whole grains offer special benefits in promoting healthy blood sugar control. Daily consumption of low-fat dairy foods was also helpful, lowering risk of type 2 diabetes by 13%. So, if you'd like to enjoy a hot bowl of barley for breakfast (an especially good idea-see immediately below), serve topped with low-fat milk. A Bet Continue reading >>

Barley And Beta-glucans In Diabetes Prevention

Barley And Beta-glucans In Diabetes Prevention

Barley Beta-Glucans in Diabetes Prevention Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, a pre-cursor to diabetes, affect millions of people around the world. The good news is that both of these potentially serious conditions can be controlled and even prevented though certain lifestyle and dietary choices. One of the most important dietary tips for people at increased risk of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance is to eat plenty of healthy, fiber-rich foods. Beta-glucan, a type of water-soluble fiber abundant in barley and a few other foods, has been shown to be particularly effective at controlling improving insulin sensitivity, or the body's ability to respond to insulin. The great thing about barley is that it contains fiber throughout the entire kernel, which means that also more processed forms, such as pearl barley, contain significant levels of fiber. In this article, we take a look at some of the most interesting modern studies done on the ability of barley and/or beta-glucans to prevent or control diabetes or insulin resistance. But before we delve into these studies, let's take a quick look at what causes type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance: What Causes Diabetes and Insulin Resistance? Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or when the body's cells do not respond to insulin (failure of the body to respond to insulin is also known as insulin resistance). In healthy people, insulin prevents large post-meal rises in blood sugar levels by directing glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream into the body's muscle and fat cells. In people with diabetes, cells become starved of their fuel, and the body may suffer from a lack of energy. This is why diabetic people often feel tired and weak. Overview of Studies on Beta-Glu Continue reading >>

Watch: Barley Helps Improve Blood Sugar Levels And Reduce Appetite

Watch: Barley Helps Improve Blood Sugar Levels And Reduce Appetite

“It is surprising yet promising that choosing the right blend of dietary fibres can - in a short period of time - generate such remarkable health benefits”, says Anne Nilsson, Associate Professor at the Food for Health Science Centre and one of the researchers behind the study. The study was conducted with healthy middle-aged participants who were asked to eat bread largely made out of barley kernels for three days - at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Approximately 11–14 hours after their final meal of the day participants were examined for risk indicators of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The researchers found that the participants’ metabolism improved for up to 14 hours, with additional benefits such as decreases in blood sugar and insulin levels, increases in insulin sensitivity and improved appetite control. The effects arise when the special mixture of dietary fibres in barley kernel reaches the gut, stimulating the increase of good bacteria and the release of important hormones. “After eating the bread made out of barley kernel, we saw an increase in gut hormones that regulate metabolism and appetite, and an increase in a hormone that helps reduce chronic low-grade inflammation, among the participants. In time this could help prevent the occurrence of both cardiovascular disease and diabetes”, says Anne Nilsson. In a previous related study conducted with a team from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden researchers also found that dietary fibres from barley kernel generate an increase of the gut bacteria Prevotella copri, which have a direct regulatory effect on blood sugar levels and help decrease the proportion of a type of gut bacteria that is considered unhealthy. The effects from barley kernel are influenced by the composition of the individua Continue reading >>

Is Barley The Latest Superfood? Grain Reduces Appetite And Blood Sugar Levels - 'helping Prevent Obesity, Diabetes And Heart Disease'

Is Barley The Latest Superfood? Grain Reduces Appetite And Blood Sugar Levels - 'helping Prevent Obesity, Diabetes And Heart Disease'

Barley could be the key to losing weight and warding off heart disease and diabetes, experts have revealed. The grain has been found to rapidly improve people's health, by reducing blood sugar levels and, in turn, the risk of diabetes. Scientists at Lund University in Sweden said the secret lies in the special mix of dietary fibers found in barley. Furthermore, the cereal, they said, helps to reduce a person's appetite and their risk of cardiovascular disease. Scroll down for video A new study has found barley rapidly improves people's health. The mix of dietary fibers in the kernels stimulates the growth of 'good' bacteria in the gut, which in turn reduces appetite and boosts metabolism. It also helps promote the release of hormones that combat inflammation, researchers said Anne Nilsson, associate professor and one of the researchers who led the study, said: 'It is surprising yet promising that choosing the right blend of dietary fibers can, in a short period of time, generate such remarkable health benefits.' To arrive at their conclusions, researchers examined a group of healthy middle-aged volunteers over a three-day period. They were asked to eat bread largely made out of barley kernels (up to 85 per cent) for breakfast, lunch and dinner each day. Around 11 to 14 hours after their final meal of the day, each participant was examined for risk indicators of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The scientists found that the volunteers' metabolism improved for up to 14 hours. And, in addition they saw other improvements, including a decrease in blood sugar and insulin levels, increases in insulin sensitivity and improved appetite control. The effects arise when the special mix of dietary fibers in barley kernels reach the gut. There, they stimulate the increase of 'go Continue reading >>

Effect Of A Barley Breakfast Cereal On Blood Glucose And Insulin Response In Normal And Diabetic Patients.

Effect Of A Barley Breakfast Cereal On Blood Glucose And Insulin Response In Normal And Diabetic Patients.

Abstract Prowashonupana (Prowash) is a shrunken-endosperm, short awn, waxy starch, hulless barley with low starch, high fiber, high protein, and a relatively high concentration of free sugars. The study was designed to compare equivalent breakfast meals (w/w) of Prowash and oatmeal for glycemic response in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. A commercial liquid meal replacer (LMR) was included as a reference standard. A substantial reduction of the post-prandial glycemic peak following ingestion of Prowash was observed as compared to LMR or oatmeal. In the non-diabetic subjects, the maximal rise in glucose from baseline was 26.3 +/- 3.9 mg/dL after LMR, 41.3 +/- 3.9 mg/dL after oatmeal and 6.4 +/- 2.7 mg/dL after Prowash (p < 0.01). The maximal increase in glucose in the diabetic patients was 69.9 +/- 4.5 mg/dL after LMR, 80.8 +/- 8.8 mg/dL after oatmeal and 28.4 +/- 3.5 mg/dL after Prowash (p < 0.01). The maximal increase in insulin post-LMR was 33.9 +/- 3.6 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients and 54.0 +/- 9.8 mIU/ml in the non-diabetic controls. Oatmeal elicited a maximal insulin increase of 29.9 +/- 4.2 mIU/ml in the control subjects and 21.4 +/- 2.5 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients. In contrast, the maximal insulin increase after Prowash was 8.6 +/- 1.5 mIU/ml in the non-diabetic controls and 6.8 +/- 1.2 mIU/ml in the diabetic patients (p < 0.01). Continue reading >>

Barley For Blood Sugar: This Humble Grain Has A Lot Going For It

Barley For Blood Sugar: This Humble Grain Has A Lot Going For It

A recent study found that the mix of fibers in barley makes it particularlygood at reducing blood sugar levels. In addition to eating barley for blood sugar, anyone wanting to protect their heart health should eat more of this humble grain. Heres a bit more about the new study plus some barleyrecipes to get you cooking! The study,funded by theAntidiabetic Food Centre and published in the British Journal of Nutrition , had participants eat bread made mostly from barley three times a day. At the end of each day, they measured risk factors for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The group eating barley bread had significantlyimproved metabolisms, lower blood sugar levels, and lower insulin levels. Why And How To Eat Barley For Blood Sugar Regulation In a press release about the study, co-authorAnne Nilsson said, After eating the bread made out of barley kernel, we saw an increase in gut hormones that regulate metabolism and appetite, and an increase in a hormone that helps reduce chronic low-grade inflammation, among the participants. In time this could help prevent the occurrence of both cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The researchers believe that its barleys fibermix thatgives it protective properties. The fiber in barley feeds a type of healthy gut bacteria called prevotella, that helps regulate blood sugar levels. You can get more details about the findings in the video at the top of this page. The patients in the study all ate standardized meals, which means the researchers were controlling for other dietary choices. If the meals hadnt been standardized, there might be a question about whether the barley bread patients were replacing something unhealthy ( like eggs,dairy, or red meat ) with fiber-rich whole grains. That would certainly have confounded the results Continue reading >>

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