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Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

When a person has diabetes, they need to carefully consider the contents of each meal. This can be especially true for carbohydrate-containing food, which not only includes desserts and other sweet treats, but bread, pasta, and fresh fruits. One fruit that traditionally has been on the "avoid" list for those with diabetes is bananas. However, for the most part, bananas eaten in moderation can be safely enjoyed when a person has diabetes. Bananas grow on banana plants that can have anywhere from 50 to 150 bananas in each bunch of fruit. The individual bananas are sold in varying sizes, from small to extra-large, the size-grading being determined by their length. Nutritional breakdown Overall, bananas are low in saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol. They also have a good mix of nutrients, including vitamin B6, potassium, and manganese. However, some doctors and dietitians may give bananas greater nutritional scrutiny when considering them for people with diabetes, because bananas are high in sugar relative to their calories. One medium banana has an estimated glycemic load of 11, according to Harvard Health Publishing on glycemic loads. Glycemic load is a measure of a food's impact on blood sugar. A glycemic load of fewer than 10 is considered low, while one above 20 is high. Can you eat bananas if you have diabetes? Examples of lower-sugar fruit options include apples, grapes, and pears. Fruits with higher sugar levels include papayas and pineapples. However, those with diabetes do not have to eliminate bananas from their diet, or any other fruit for that matter. Their other nutritional values in terms of vitamins and minerals can make them a healthy option for those with diabetes when consumed in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommend incorporating fr Continue reading >>

Bananas For Diabetes: Good Or Bad?

Bananas For Diabetes: Good Or Bad?

Bananas for diabetes. Are you curious to know whether they are a good or bad fruit to include in your diet? Glad you asked. Because while eating bananas are commonly thought of as being a “healthy,” when you have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, there's a bit more to the story. Let's explore bananas together now. JUMP TO: Bananas as a common fruit | Nutrition facts | The downfalls of fructose | Green vs. ripe bananas | Glycemic index | Potassium sources comparison | Conclusion Bananas: a popular common fruit As we all know, bananas are a popular fruit, well known for their bright yellow peel and unique boomerang shape. People from all across the world consume bananas. And as suggested above, bananas are often considered a health food because they are relatively low in calories and rich in minerals like potassium, plus they’re an easy snack to grab on the go. Still, while they may provide various health benefits for the general population, the question still remains: are they really a healthy choice for people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? To find out, let’s start by taking a peek at the nutrition facts. Banana Nutrition Facts For one medium-sized ripe banana: Calories: 105 Total carbohydrates: 26.9g Protein: 1.20g Fat: 0.39g Fiber: 3.1g With only about 1 gram of protein and less than a gram of fat, it’s pretty easy to see that the dominant macronutrient in a banana is… carbohydrates. The carbohydrate content of one medium banana is a whopping 26.9 grams (beware of the oncoming blood sugar spikes)! Foods with a higher carb count can sometimes be “balanced out” if they also contain a high amount of dietary fiber, which reduces the overall net carbs of a food (the available carbs for digestion). But unfortunately, bananas aren’t rich in fiber. Just Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? How much sugar does a banana have? Perhaps these are the most frequently asked questions from people who are suffering from diabetes health condition. And the answer is Yes, as long as they are unripe or semi-ripe and you don’t overdo it and eat a whole dozen. The rest of this article explains why. Diabetics Need to Watch Their Carbs All carbohydrates we eat turn into sugar in our body. Insulin is needed to take this sugar into cells. People suffering from Type-2 diabetes usually have two problems; one, their pancreas don’t produce as much insulin as their bodies can use and two, their cells are not very sensitive to insulin. The result: blood sugar can shoot up. That’s why diabetics need to watch their carbs. Bananas are full of good stuff; in addition to carbs (around 30 grams in an average-sized banana), they are loaded with fiber, Vitamins B6 and C, manganese, copper and potassium. RELATED: 17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications Bananas Have a Low GI Index Overall, bananas have a low glycemic index (GI), the score that measures how much a food increases your blood sugar level when you eat it. The lower the GI, the better. Where a 30-gram serving of brown bread has a glycemic index of 69, a 120-gram serving of raw banana has a glycemic index of just 48. You can also create your own healthy dessert by sprinkling powdered cinnamon on sliced or diced bananas. The health benefits of cinnamon for a diabetic individual are explained here. Ripe vs Unripe: The Crucial Difference for Diabetics Ripe bananas contain 10% fiber, which is good for everyone, including people with diabetes; however, they also contain 8% carbohydrates, which increases blood sugar levels sharply. This is because the starch in the banana has been converte Continue reading >>

Banana Good Or Bad | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Banana Good Or Bad | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have an age old habit of having 1-2 bananas in breakfast. Now that I have been diagnosed with Type-2, is it advisable to continue with this habit? I have banana has lots of carbs and is not good but many people say it is healthy to eat banana even as a diabetic. I have an age old habit of having 1-2 bananas in breakfast. Now that I have been diagnosed with Type-2, is it advisable to continue with this habit? I have banana has lots of carbs and is not good but many people say it is healthy to eat banana even as a diabetic. Our ears must of been burning as I'm interested in knowing if I can continue to eat Bananas, as I enjoy Toasted Wholemeal Bread with a Banana on it, as an alternative to porridge on some mornings. So after seeing the add advising us not to eat bananas, I became concerned and decided to ask why there not recomended, but you beat me to it, so I hope we get a response soon. Just googled that banana has 92% carb- one medium banana has 27g carb so i guess having 2 in the morning will leave little budget for carb for the rest of the day..and god knows what will happen to the blood sugar level with such a high dump of carb So I guess there is more to it than I am getting, i will have to get rid of bananas VinnyJames Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member Some will say that bananas are the devils work but I love them. I wouldn't eat them every day but I have one occasionally and usually just before I hit the gym so I can work off the carbs that way. I think most of us would consider bananas a no-no. The best way to find out for sure is to test before and after eating them to see how you personally are with them. But as you say, 2 nanas i Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Are Bananas Safe In Diabetes?

Are Bananas Safe In Diabetes?

Bananas are considered healthy fruits, but the amount of sugar in bananas can be worrying to some people, particularly those with diabetes. As diabetic patients need to monitor their blood sugar levels carefully, eating an excess of many types of food can be dangerous. If you love these potassium-packed fruits, but also need to monitor your glucose levels, it is important to understand the risks. How Bananas affect Diabetes & Blood Sugar Levels? Bananas are excellent sources of certain nutrients, including potassium, sugar, dietary fiber, vitamin B6, manganese, and protein, among others. When it comes to diabetes and blood sugar levels, the amount of sugar in bananas is the main focus. A medium-sized banana can have approximately 30 grams of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are converted into glucose and other sugars in the body, which can cause a rise in the blood sugar. In healthy individuals, that rise would be mitigated and controlled by insulin, a hormone that is produced in the pancreas. However, in someone with diabetes, the pancreas either cannot make the proper amount of insulin, or the body cannot use the insulin that is created (insulin sensitivity). Therefore, when carbohydrates are consumed, particularly those made up of simple sugars, the amount of glucose in the blood rises. Thus, when someone eats a banana, their blood sugar will have a tendency to rise. Carbohydrates are an essential part of any diet, in moderation, so bananas are not inherently bad to eat, even for someone with diabetes. That being said, bananas also contain dietary fiber – a different type of carbohydrate that can actually help to regulate blood sugar levels in the body. With approximately 6 grams of starch per medium-sized banana, some of the blood sugar problems caused by the sugar wi Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas?

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas?

If you have diabetes, you may have heard that bananas are too sweet or too high in sugar to fit into your diet. This common belief is related to the fact that bananas are high in carbohydrates, which the body converts into sugar, and because they are rumored to have a high glycemic index, a measure of a food’s impact on blood sugar levels. However, bananas actually have a low glycemic index and are a nutritious food that can be an asset to a healthy diet. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends fruit be included in a diabetes meal plan. As with any fruit, bananas can fit as long as the carbohydrates are factored into the plan. Video of the Day Carbohydrates converted to glucose during digestion, and with the help of insulin, glucose provides energy and fuels your cells for action. However, people with diabetes either have sluggish insulin, or don’t make enough insulin, and as a result, have high levels of glucose circulating in the blood. To best manage blood sugar or blood glucose levels, it’s helpful to eat moderate portions of carbohydrate-containing foods and to spread these foods throughout the day. Fruit contains carbohydrate, and a medium banana contains about 30 grams of carbohydrate -- the same as a sandwich made of 2 slices of bread. If you know your carbohydrate goals, you can decide which carbohydrate foods to eat at your meals and snacks. For example, if your goal is 45 grams per meal, and you want to eat a banana with your sandwich at lunch, you can either eat a whole sandwich at 30 grams plus one-half banana at 15 grams, or you can choose to eat one-half of the sandwich so you can eat the whole banana. In addition to being a carbohydrate-rich fruit, bananas are often rumored to have a high glycemic index (GI), which is a measure of a food Continue reading >>

Should You Eat Bananas If You’re Diabetic?

Should You Eat Bananas If You’re Diabetic?

Diabetics have to be careful about what they eat, and too many carbs or high glycemic index foods are usually a no-no. On the other hand, fresh fruit and vegetables are supposed to have a beneficial effect on the condition. So where does that leave you when it comes to fruit like the humble banana? When you have Type-2 diabetes, your body can’t produce adequate insulin, causing glucose to get pulled out of the blood for storage in cells. As a result, your sugar levels go through dips and spikes. This means your diet has a vital role to play in helping regulate the sugar levels. Very high glycemic foods can exaggerate the spikes and the sudden dips after the sugar is burnt through quickly. What’s In A Banana? Bananas are a rich source of dietary fiber as well as vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium, making them a great healthy snack or ingredient in a meal. While the B6 keeps you in a good mood, vitamin C does wonders for your immune system, potassium helps regulate blood pressure, and the fiber keeps you feeling satiated for longer. One study even indicated that native banana starch (24 g per day) could be beneficial for increasing insulin sensitivity and may help lower body weight in obese Type-2 diabetics.1 It is no wonder then that they are also one of the most popular fresh fruits in the United States.2 What diabetics need to keep in mind though, is that bananas also contain carbohydrates and this must be factored in when planning your meals for the day. Diabetics Can Have Bananas Too The American Diabetes Association encourages the consumption of fruit by diabetics and says eating bananas as part of a healthy diet is absolutely okay.3 In fact, one study showed that a banana is actually among the best whole fruit (along with blueberries and grapefruit) you can h Continue reading >>

Bananas Are They Bad

Bananas Are They Bad

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My husband is possibly T2 or at least almost certainly prediabetic.....just waiting another blood test result...He.is a real banana addict and eats 2 or 3 a day and has done for years. I always understood bananas were not good for diabetes so he should stop eating them but I found this on the web so what do you think The American Diabetes Association says bananas have the bad reputation of being high in sugar or fattening. However, these fruits are good for diabetes because they are actually low in sugar, which won't raise blood glucose levels. As a low-fat treat , they help diabetics maintain or lose weight. Bananas also contain potassium, which reduces sodium in the body I am going to have a small banana tomorrow before I walk the dog. I will test before and after and let you know. Do watch out with bananas, I recently started eating them because of mineral deficiencies. It took me from a fasting 4.1 to 4.1 at 1 hour. But in the meantime I actually achieved a 9.7 at 35 mins ! ! and that was with a slightly green banana which is lower in carbs than a ripe one. This is what the American Diabetes Ass says Bananas vary quite a bit in size, so counting the carbs that they provide can be difficult. Below are some estimates for different sizes. Extra small banana (6 inches long or less) 18.5 grams of carbohydrate Small banana (about 6-6 7/8 inches long) 23 grams of carbohydrate Medium banana (7-7 7/8 inches long) 27 grams of carbohydrate Large banana (8-8 7/8 inches long) 31 grams of carbohydrate Extra large banana (9 inches or longer) 35 grams of carbohydrate They are also quick release, meaning the carb content turns to glucose very quickly, which is lik Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Bananas If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Bananas If I Have Diabetes?

Knowledge is power. But, it can be dangerous too. The wrong kind of knowledge, I mean. The wrong information – when you think something is true, but, in fact, the truth lies elsewhere. Like the case of bananas and diabetes – can diabetics eat bananas? A case of gross misinterpretation and lack of proper knowledge. But worry not, we are here to take care of that. Banana – A Brief A fruit so ‘everyday’ (and delicious) that there wouldn’t be a soul that doesn’t like it. Botanically speaking, banana is a berry. In certain nations, the bananas that are used for cooking are called plantains. Usually elongated and curved, the soft flesh is rich in starch and is covered with a rind that can be yellow, green or brownish-red. Banana is grown in over 135 countries worldwide. The fruit is also cultivated for its fiber, banana wine, and banana beer. There is no distinct difference between bananas and plantains, except that plantains tend to be a little firmer and starchier. Yes, banana is a lip-smacking fruit that improves any dish that you add it to. It has superb benefits and helps prevent numerous diseases. But… …is that the case with diabetes too? Let’s find out. Diabetes And Bananas – The Connection Why bananas? The fruit is considered to be one of the healthiest and most potent. What does it have to do anything with diabetes? Why the link? Let’s have a glance at diabetes – it is a condition where your body cannot efficiently use the insulin that it produces. This ultimately leads to the accumulation of glucose in your blood, resulting in high blood sugar. And now, for the link – the average banana contains about 30 grams of carbohydrates. And most of these carbs come from sugars. Hence, the connection. The larger the banana, the more the sugars. So, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Even diabetics should eat at least two servings of fruit per day, and bananas are one healthful way of filling that requirement. One extra-small banana contains 8 percent of the daily value for potassium, a mineral that can help you control your blood pressure. It also provides you with 2 grams of fiber and 12 percent of the daily value for vitamin C. As long as you're careful to eat them with meals, and account for their carbohydrate content in your daily meal plan, they can remain a part of your diet. Carbohydrate Counting The recommended serving size for bananas for diabetics is one extra-small banana, which is a banana that is no more than 6 inches long. A banana of this size contains 19 grams of carbohydrates, which is about a third of the 45 grams to 60 grams of carbohydrates most diabetics can consume in each meal. Glycemic Index Foods that are low on the glycemic index cause less of a rise in blood sugar levels than foods that are higher on the glycemic index. A banana that is a bit green is lower on the glycemic index than a riper banana. If you eat a banana, which is a medium glycemic index food, eat it along with foods that are low on the glycemic index or with foods that contain little or no carbohydrate, as this will help keep your blood sugar from spiking. Foods low on the glycemic index include nuts, non-starchy vegetables and beans. Meat, fish, poultry, cheese and eggs are examples of foods that contain very little carbohydrate. Fruits that have a lower glycemic index include raw apples, cherries and grapefruit, and those that have a higher glycemic index include dried dates and watermelon. Create Your Plate The American Diabetes Association's Create Your Plate method allows you to control your blood sugar without worrying about counting carbohydrates. Y Continue reading >>

Diabetic Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? | Diabetic Connect

Diabetic Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? | Diabetic Connect

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? By Amy Reeder, Registered Dietitian and CDE No Comments Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Bananas are a healthy way to get nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. However, bananas sometimes tend to get a bad rap, even from doctors. In an internet search, you might frequently run into informational advertisements with bananas as part of the list of the five foods you should never eat. Never eat? That seems a little extreme, especially if you know your nutrition facts about this fruit. Bananas are fat free, sodium free, and cholesterol free. But it is important to understand that bananas are NOT carbohydrate free! And figuring the carbohydrate content of a banana can be tricky because the content varies with size. Use this chart when calculating the carb content of the bananas you eat (measure once and eyeball thereafter): From small to large bananas in that scale, you will get anywhere from two to four grams of fiber per serving, depending on the size. Obviously the larger the banana, the higher the fiber, potassium, and vitamin C content, but that also comes with higher carbohydrate content. Of the 30 grams of carbohydrate in a medium banana, 19 grams are sugar and the other 11 grams are starch, including three grams of fiber. A fully ripe banana has a glycemic index of 51this would be considered a low-glycemic index food, as the cutoff is 55. In addition, the ripeness of a banana changes its glycemic index. An under-ripe banana with visible green sections on the peel would have a glycemic index of approximately 42, while an over-ripe banana w Continue reading >>

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