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Balancing Carbs And Protein Diabetes

American Diabetes Association: Help For Diabetics?

American Diabetes Association: Help For Diabetics?

The American Diabetes Association was founded in 1940. Their mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. Diabetes is a disease in which the body cannot metabolize blood sugar correctly, which leads to a buildup of excess sugar in the bloodstream. This excess sugar accelerates the symptoms of heart disease and damages other body systems. Let’s take a look at what the American Diabetes Association recommends in terms of nutrition, and see if these policies can be trusted as the best advice for diabetic care. On their website, the American Diabetes Association directs diabetics to eat between 45-60 grams of carbohydrates at each meal. Assuming a person eats three meals a day, this advice works out to telling diabetics to eat a minimum of 135 grams to a maximum of 180 grams of carbohydrates per day. Now, 180 grams of carbohydrates works out to 720 calories (1 gram of carb=4 calories). In a daily diet of 2000 calories, eating the minimum recommended carbs would set the daily percentage of carbs at 27% (540/2000) and the maximum carbs would be 36% (720/2000). But in addition, the American Diabetes Association recommends that diabetics reduce their intake of saturated fat and cholesterol, and eat more non-starchy vegetables. Although non-starchy vegetables are lower in carb than cereal foods, they still do have carbs in them, so the ADA diet is actually about 55 percent carbohydrate, 20 percent protein, and about 25 percent fat, expressed in a ratio of 55:20:25. Does the ADA Diet Help Diabetics Control Blood Sugar Levels? Let’s determine whether this diet composition of 55:20:25 is good advice for helping diabetics with controlling their blood sugar, one of the most critical components of managing diabetes. Below are Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Carbohydrates And Diabetes

en espaolLos carbohidratos y la diabetes Carbohydrates, like proteins and fats, are one of the three main components of food that provide energy and other things the body needs. They should be part of a healthy diet for all kids, including kids with diabetes. But carbohydrates (carbs), which are found in foods such as bread, fruit, and candy, can affect a person's blood sugar level . So kids withdiabetes might need to track how many carbohydrates they eat. Following a meal plan can help kids balance carbs with medications and exercise so that they maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Like exercising and testing blood sugar regularly, tracking carbs is just another step many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. The two main forms of carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Types of sugars include fructose (sugar found in fruit and some baked goods), glucose (the main sugar in our bodies that's also found in foods like cake, cookies, and soft drinks), and lactose (sugar found in milk and yogurt). Types of starches include vegetables like potatoes, corn, and peas; grains, rice, and cereals; and breads. The body breaks down or converts most carbs into glucose , which is absorbed into the bloodstream. As the glucose level rises in the blood, the pancreas releases the hormone insulin . Insulin is needed to move glucose from the blood into the cells, where it's used as an energysource. In people with diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin ( type 1 diabetes ) or the body can't respond normally to the insulin that is made ( type 2 diabetes ). In both types of diabetes, glucose can't get into the cells normally, so a person's blood sugar level gets too high. High blood sugar levels can make people sick if they don't receive treatment. Eating carbohydrates makes bl Continue reading >>

7 Powerful Food Combos To Control Diabetes

7 Powerful Food Combos To Control Diabetes

Shutterstock The Need-to-Know Nutrient Combo It's important for all of us to eat a diet that supports and controls blood sugar, whether we have diabetes or not. All you need to remember is one simple formula to ensure that every meal fills you up and keeps levels stable: Protein + carbs + healthy fats. While whole-grain carbs are satisfying, eating them alone can lead to changes in blood-sugar levels that take your mood and energy on a roller coaster ride. Adding a dose of protein and healthy fats provides sustained energy and stabilizes blood-glucose levels. Ready to give it a try? These simple food pairings take all three nutrients into account for a tasty, satisfying dish. Continue reading >>

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions. It currently affects over 400 million people worldwide (1). Although diabetes is a complicated disease, maintaining good blood sugar control can greatly reduce the risk of complications (2, 3). One of the ways to achieve better blood sugar levels is to follow a low-carb diet. This article provides a detailed overview of low-carb diets for managing diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body cannot process carbohydrates effectively. Normally, when you eat carbs, they are broken down into small units of glucose, which end up as blood sugar. When blood sugar levels go up, the pancreas responds by producing the hormone insulin. This hormone allows the blood sugar to enter cells. In healthy people, blood sugar levels remain within a narrow range throughout the day. In diabetes, however, this system doesn't work the way it is supposed to. This is a big problem, because having both too high and too low blood sugar levels can cause severe harm. There are several types of diabetes, but the two most common ones are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both of these conditions can be diagnosed at any age. In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune process destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Diabetics must inject insulin several times a day to ensure that glucose gets into the cells and stays at a healthy level in the bloodstream (4). In type 2 diabetes, the beta cells at first produce enough insulin, but the body's cells are resistant to its action, so blood sugar remains high. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down. Over time, the beta cells lose their ability to produce enough insulin (5). Of the three nutrients -- protein, carbs and fat -- carbs have the grea Continue reading >>

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Diabetes SpectrumVolume 13 Number 3, 2000, Page 132 Marion J. Franz, MS, RD, LD, CDE In Brief People with diabetes are frequently given advice about protein that has no scientific basis. In addition, although weight is lost when individuals follow a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, there is no evidence that such diets are followed long-term or that there is less recidivism than with other low-calorie diets. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are in poor metabolic control may have increased protein requirements. However, the usual amount of protein consumed by people with diabetes adequately compensates for the increased protein catabolism. People with diabetes need adequate and accurate information about protein on which to base their food decisions. In the United States, ~16% of the average adult consumption of calories is from protein, and this has varied little from 1909 to the present.1 Protein intake is also fairly consistent across all ages from infancy to older age. A daily intake of 2,500 calories contributes ~100 g of protein—about twice what is needed to replace protein lost on a daily basis. Excess amino acids must be converted into other storage products or oxidized as fuel. Therefore, in theory, the excess ingested protein could, through the process of gluconeogenesis, produce glucose. This would mean that 100 g of protein could produce ~50 g of glucose. This has been the basis of the statement that if about half of ingested protein is converted to glucose, protein will have one-half the effect of carbohydrate on blood glucose levels. However, this belief has been challenged.2-4 Protein controversies exist either because research has not provided conclusive answers or because professionals are not aware of the research. This article will review Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet Improves Glucose Control In Small Study

Low-carb Diet Improves Glucose Control In Small Study

Low-Carb Diet Improves Glucose Control in Small Study People with diabetes are generally encouraged to eat a nutritionally balanced, low-fat diet. But now, a small new study out of Sweden is lending support to the idea that a higher-fat, low-carbohydrate diet may work best for some people with diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes have the same nutritional requirements as those without diabetes. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 , released by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommends a diet composed of 45% to 65% carbohydrate, 20% to 35% fat, and 10% to 35% protein for adults age 19 and older. To compare the effects of a low-fat diet and a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet on various health markers such as weight, blood glucose level, and blood cholesterol level, researchers at Linkping University recruited 61 adults with Type 2 diabetes, randomly assigning them to one of the two diets. Those on the low-fat diet aimed to eat 55% to 60% of their calories as carbohydrate, 30% of their calories as fat, and 10% to 15% of their calories as protein. Those on the high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet aimed to consume roughly 20% of their calories as carbohydrate, 50% as fat, and 30% as protein. The participants got together for four group meetings during the first year of the study, and all were available for follow-up at the end of two years. The researchers found that both diets resulted in an average weight loss of 4 kilograms (roughly 9 pounds). In the high-fat, low-carbohydrate group, blood glucose control had improved at the six-month mark, with HbA1c levels dropping from an average of 7.5% down to 7.1% and insulin levels decreasing by 30%. This group also saw an increase in their levels of HDL, or good, chol Continue reading >>

Does Eating Protein With Carbs Lower Glucose Readings?

Does Eating Protein With Carbs Lower Glucose Readings?

Does Eating Protein With Carbs Lower Glucose Readings? Add lean protein to your carbs to lower the blood glucose response. Why Are Fasting Blood Sugars Higher Than Postprandial? Monitoring your blood sugar readings can be a useful method of keeping tabs on your health. If your blood glucose levels start reading higher than normal, it could be a sign that you have prediabetes and are at a higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The type of foods you eat prior to a glucose test will affect the result -- particularly if you eat more protein, which may lower the blood glucose reading. The purpose of a blood glucose test is to measure the concentration of glucose, or sugar, in your bloodstream. The test involves drawing blood with a needle, either as a fasted test after eight hours of not eating, or a random test administered at any time of the day. For a fasted test, a reading of between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter is considered normal. After a random test, your levels should be below 125 milligrams per deciliter. If your reading is high, it shows there is a high concentration of sugar in your bloodstream. Of the three macronutrients -- protein, carbohydrate and fat -- carbs have the biggest impact on blood glucose levels. Because of the way your body digests carbs, a meal high in carbohydrates will lead to a spike in blood glucose levels. This happens to an even greater degree when the carbohydrates ingested are simple carbs such as white rice, white potatoes and sugar, or liquid carbs such as soda and fruit juice. Adding protein to a carb-based meal or snack will lower your blood glucose reading. The Diabetes.co.uk website notes that protein does affect blood sugar levels, but to a lesser extent than carbs. Additionally, Marion J. Franz of the American Diabete Continue reading >>

Protein, Carbs And Fats Balance That's Best For Weight Loss

Protein, Carbs And Fats Balance That's Best For Weight Loss

The world is littered with wellness formulas ( 5:2 , 7:2:1 , 4-7-8 ), but American nutritionist Mark McDonald believes his is the best one for fat loss and managing your weight: PFC Every 3 . Thats eating protein, fats and carbohydrates in the right balance every three hours, he explained on Today watch the video above for his examples of simple, tasty meals that represent his rule. Eating this way will not only prevent diabetes, or help manage it, it will give you your body back so you can reprogram your metabolism. McDonald says his approach is best because its rooted in both physiology (that is, it works with your body, not against it); and its an approach you can sustain for the rest of your life (rather than depriving yourself of foods you love which is guaranteed to backfire long-term). Learn your foods, balance your blood sugar, he said. When your blood sugars balanced youll release your stored fat and permanently achieve [weight-loss] results. And best of all? The PFC Every 3 includes chocolate. Win win! Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

Type 1 Diabetes Nutrition

If you have type 1 diabetes, it is important to know how many carbohydrates you eat at a meal. This information helps you determine how much insulin you should take with your meal to maintain blood sugar (glucose) control. Carbohydrates are the main type of food that raises blood sugar. The starch, fruit and milk groups of the Food Group Pyramid for Diabetes are high in carbs. Foods in the Other Carbohydrates and Combination Food groups are also high in carbs. The vegetable group has a small amount of carbohydrates. The meat and fat groups have few or no carbs. The amount of carbohydrates you eat at each meal will determine how high your blood sugar rises after the meal. The other two major nutrients, protein and fat ,also have an effect on blood glucose levels, though it is not as rapid or great as carbohydrates. Most people with diabetes can control their blood sugar by limiting carbohydrate servings to 2-4 per meal and 1-2 per snack. A delicate balance of carbohydrate intake, insulin, and physical activity is necessary for the best blood sugar (glucose) levels. Eating carbohydrates increases your blood sugar (glucose) level. Exercise tends to decrease it (although not always). If the three factors are not in balance, you can have wide swings in blood sugar (glucose) levels. If you have type 1 diabetes and take a fixed dose of insulin, the carbohydrate content of your meals and snacks should be consistent from day to day. CHILDREN AND DIABETES Weight and growth patterns can help determine if a child with type 1 diabetes is getting enough nutrition. Changes in eating habits and more physical activity help improve blood sugar (glucose) control. For children with diabetes, special occasions (like birthdays or Halloween) require additional planning because of the extra sw Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

Protein And Carbs - Get The Balance Right

Protein And Carbs - Get The Balance Right

Protein and carbs - get the balance right While some believe high-protein diets aid weight loss, cutting out carbs can be detrimental to health. Nutritional therapist Kerry Torrens explains why balance and moderation is key... Various high-protein diets claim that cutting carbs in favour of protein can help you to lose weight faster while still feeling satisfied. However, losing carbs from your diet completely can be detrimental to health. It's true that protein burns comparatively more calories than other energy sources when it's digested. And we all need some protein (whether from meat, fish, dairy or grains) for strong muscles and bones, hormonal health and immunity. However, carbohydrates are the body's preferred source of energy, and our brains, in particular, need carbs to maintain alertness and concentration. As with all diets, there are downsides. High-protein diets put an extra load on the kidneys and may cause calcium to be lost from your bones. Too much high-fat protein may raise your cholesterol levels. A high-carb diet, meanwhile, can disrupt blood sugar levels, increase the risk of diabetes and lead to energy fluctuations and mood swings. Moderation is the key. Protein and carbs both play a part in helping you shed extra pounds. Choose lean protein like chicken, turkey, fish and low-fat dairy - about the size of a deck of cards - and keep carb servings to the size of your clenched fist. Choose complex carbs, such as wholegrain versions of bread, pasta and rice, and include plenty of veg and fruit in your diet. So when are the best times to eat carbs and protein, what should your portion size be and what are your guideline daily amounts? Kerry offers further guidance in her features; a balanced diet for men and a balanced diet for women . Continue reading >>

Whats The Right Balance Of Carbs And Fat?

Whats The Right Balance Of Carbs And Fat?

Whats the Right Balance of Carbs and Fat? For at least several decades, there has been an ongoing debate among nutrition researchers about how much fat and carbohydrate you should include in your diet. Here at Diabetes Flashpoints, weve covered this controversy as it relates to both people with diabetes , specifically , and the wider population . Weve also looked at the effects of two other major components of diets, protein and fruits and vegetables . When studies of this nature arent targeted toward people with diabetes, one common outcome that they measure is body weight lost or gained something thats important to many people for health reasons. But a new study looks at an even more consequential outcome: your risk of premature death. Published late last month in the journal The Lancet, the study looked at over 135,000 participants in 18 countries for an average of 7.4 years. Participants food intake was measured using a validated questionnaire (one that has been compared with actual food intake in a smaller group to ensure that it produces accurate results), according to the percentage of calories provided by carbohydrate, protein, or fat. The researchers were most interested in looking at the effects of diet composition on overall risk of death, as well as major cardiovascular events like heart attack and stroke. As noted in a HealthDay article on the study , the researchers found that a higher carbohydrate intake was associated with a higher overall risk of death but not a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, or death from it. The risk of death in participants with the highest carbohydrate intake the top fifth, with carbohydrates making up 77% of their diet was 28% higher than in the fifth of participants with the lowest carbohydrate intake. On the other hand, Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes: A Personalized Approach

Diet And Diabetes: A Personalized Approach

By Osama Hamdy, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Joslin Obesity Clinical Program; Amy Campbell, M.S., R.D., C.D.E., Joslin Education Program Manager Despite the new fad diets published and diet aids marketed each year, Americans’ waistlines and the epidemic of obesity and diabetes continue to expand. With current scientific knowledge and clinical experience, however, health care providers and industry influencers can make a difference. In 2005 for the first time in 13 years, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) updated the Food Guide Pyramid. The USDA touts the latest version as no longer a “one size fits all” approach, but rather an “individualized approach to improving diet and lifestyle.” Though this long-awaited update to the nation’s only federal nutrition guidelines offers healthier food choices for healthy Americans, for the 17 million Americans with type 2 diabetes and the 41 million more who are at high risk for developing the disease, these guidelines are not enough. One Size Fits Some Joslin’s approach to diabetes management has always been to focus on the individual, and not dictate a “one size fits all” strategy. At a time when the diet advice waters are muddied with thousands claiming the answer to the battle of the bulge, Joslin offers evidence-based clinical nutrition guidelines for overweight and obese people with type 2 diabetes, prediabetes or at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The ultimate goal is to help these populations improve cardiovascular health, reduce body fat and increase sensitivity to insulin. This decreases their risk for devastating diabetes complications, including kidney disease, heart disease and amputations. The Basics The biggest difference between the USDA’s guidelines and Joslin’s is the recomm Continue reading >>

Understanding Food

Understanding Food

All food is not equal in calories. Fat, for example, has more than twice the calories, gram for gram, as equal amounts of carbohydrates or protein. This page is an overview, and you will learn general information about: The subsequent sections provide more detailed information: Main sources of calories in food To begin with, let’s talk about food in general. We obtain nutrition through the various foods we eat. Foods supply critical vitamins and minerals essential for health. Foods also supply us with energy, or calories. To keep your body running, you need three types of food: However, all food is not equal in calories. Fat, for example, has more than twice the calories, gram for gram, as equal amounts of carbohydrates or protein. There is not and ideal mix of carbohydrate, protein and fat that is right for everyone. Targets depend on your calorie goals, body weight, lipid profile, blood glucose control, activity levels, and personal preferences. A registered dietitian can help design a meal plan that is right for you. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest: Carbohydrates – 45 to 65% of your daily calories * Protein – 10 to 35% of your daily calories Fat- 20 to 35% of your daily calories * The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for carbohydrates is 130 grams per day. This is the “minimum” suggested intake for most people. The following is an example fuel mix. Your targets may vary. Carbohydrates If you have diabetes, it is essential to learn about carbohydrates. Why? Because among all the foods, carbohydrates have the largest effect on your blood sugar. Carbohydrates include starches and sugars. During digestion, both forms of carbohydrate break down in your body to single units of sugar, called glucose. Carbohydrate is an important part of your d Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting & Diabetes

What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting, also called carb counting, is a meal planning tool for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrate counting involves keeping track of the amount of carbohydrate in the foods you eat each day. Carbohydrates are one of the main nutrients found in food and drinks. Protein and fat are the other main nutrients. Carbohydrates include sugars, starches, and fiber. Carbohydrate counting can help you control your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels because carbohydrates affect your blood glucose more than other nutrients. Healthy carbohydrates, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables, are an important part of a healthy eating plan because they can provide both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, lower your cholesterol levels, and control your weight. Unhealthy carbohydrates are often food and drinks with added sugars. Although unhealthy carbohydrates can also provide energy, they have little to no nutrients. More information about which carbohydrates provide nutrients for good health and which carbohydrates do not is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Diabetes Diet and Eating. The amount of carbohydrate in foods is measured in grams. To count grams of carbohydrate in foods you eat, you’ll need to know which foods contain carbohydrates learn to estimate the number of grams of carbohydrate in the foods you eat add up the number of grams of carbohydrate from each food you eat to get your total for the day Your doctor can refer you to a dietitian or diabetes educator who can help you develop a healthy eating plan based on carbohydrate counting. Which foods contain carbohydrates? Foods that contain carbohydrates include grains, such as b Continue reading >>

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