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Bagel Diabetes

Foods And Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings

Foods And Drinks That Can Cause Blood Sugar Swings

Just when you think you're making all the right food choices, your blood sugar takes a leap or dive. Foods and drinks can have an impact you might not expect, and these surprise blood-sugar changes can be harmful (potentially causing low or high levels). Here are some things you should consider: Don't let bagels betray you. Counting carbs is a way of life when you have diabetes. Bread can really rack up those carbs, but not all bread is created equal. Think there's no difference between a bagel and an English muffin? One plain English muffin has 140 calories and 27 grams of carbohydrates. A bagel that's 4½ inches in diameter serves up 294 calories and 58 grams of carbs. That's about as many calories and even more carbs than a glazed donut. "It's about portion size. Some bagels are the size of a plate," says Pamela Allweiss, MD, MPH. She's a medical officer in the division of diabetes translation at the CDC. A fruit in any other form may be twice as sweet. All fruits have sugar, but did you know that different forms of the same fruit have vastly different amounts? Dried fruit packs a sugary punch compared with its fresh counterpart. Ten grapes, which weigh about 1.75 ounces, have 34 calories and 8 grams of sugar. They're also full of water, which helps fill you up. A 1.5-ounce, single-serving box of raisins packs 129 calories and 15 grams of sugar, but none of the water. "Without the water, the sugar is more concentrated in dried fruit. And with the smaller size, you're likely to eat many more of them," Allweiss says. Fruit juices are similarly deceptive. A 5-ounce Florida orange has 65 calories, 13 grams of sugar, and 3 grams of fiber. An 8-ounce glass of juice, though, has 112 calories, 24 grams of sugar, and no fiber. Sports drinks may not be so sporty. They may have Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

4 Foods To Steer Clear Of, And What To Have Instead

4 Foods To Steer Clear Of, And What To Have Instead

When you have diabetes, the list of foods to avoid can seem endless. Before you throw your hands up in despair, here are some healthy alternatives to foods you really should avoid when trying to manage blood glucose levels. 1. Coffee Drinks Flavored coffee drinks may seem harmless, but they can be loaded with hidden sugars. A large Frozen Coffee Coolatta®from Dunkin Donuts made with skim milk contains 410 calories and 101 grams of carbohydrates (98 grams coming from sugar!) And that’s the variety made with skim milk! If you reach for the large Frozen Coffee Coolatta made with cream, you will almost double the calorie content to 800 calories and the carbs to 97 grams per serving. These drinks provide the equivalent of 23 teaspoons of sugar. All of that added sugar spikes blood glucose levels, which is the last thing you want when you're dealing with diabetes. So what should you do if you are craving some flavor in your coffee, but don’t want all of the added calories and sugar? The smarter substitution: Try a coffee that has already been infused with flavor, such as hazelnut or French vanilla coffee with a splash of milk. A large French vanilla coffee from Dunkin Donuts (without any added cream or sugar) contains only 10 calories and 1 gram of carbohydrate. That’s a savings of 96 grams of carbohydrate or more! If you prefer to make your own, try sprinkling your coffee beans with a pinch of cinnamon, which not only helps to sweeten it up, but may help improve blood glucose regulation as well. 2. Prepackaged Fruit Smoothies Sure, they sound healthy. A smoothie blended with fresh fruit and vegetables—how could that ever be a bad thing? But pre-bottled smoothies, or ones you order from a local coffee bar or deli, often contain excessive amounts of added sugars. For Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Bagels?

Can A Diabetic Eat Bagels?

This is from my own experience with type 2 diabetes. If you are intent on reversing the diabetes then I would suggest you do not eat a bagel until you have accomplished this and then wait some months after your blood glucose levels have been normal. Then try a half a bagel and check your blood glucose level about 2 hours later. If everything is fine then try a whole bagel later. Just keep checking to see how the foods you take in affect your blood glucose levels. Bagels are carbs and carbs become sugar in your body very quickly. Whole wheat flour is a bit better but is still a carb. Additionally I suggest eating carbs at breakfast or lunch time rather than dinner. It is healthier for your body. Continue reading >>

6 Bad Breakfast Choices For Diabetics!

6 Bad Breakfast Choices For Diabetics!

I ate the skinny girl inside of me. I was hungry. You know, dieters like to eat their smoothy in the morning and be done with it. Or maybe that cereal with low fat milk. Great! Good for you! Diebetics are NOT Dieters. And if I have to post till I am blue in my face and call me Smurfette, I am going to get that through to you! Yes YOU. The Diabetic who thinks that if they just lose weight all will be well. That if they just have that small shake for breakfast like those commercials tell you to do..you will be a-ok and skinny in no time! You think your pancreas actually needs to lose weight? Well? Do ya'? Yes, nuts and whole grains like rolled oats are good for you in small portions but unfortunately not when they're tossed with loads of sugar and dried fruit ... 1 cup of lowfat granola with raisins (98g carbs) with 1/2 cup of fat free milk (6g carbs) Yogurt is undeniably a healthy food, but you have to choose the unsweetened, full-fat variety to get the benefits and keep carbs low. And toast and English muffins, even if you opt for whole grain, are high in carbs, so it's always best to eat just half or skip entirely. 1 cup of fat free, fruit flavored yogurt (47g carbs) with 1 whole wheat English muffin (27g) and 1 tbsp fruit preserves (14g) Picture this: A beautiful person sitting in a trendy coffee shop, eating a delicious-looking, oversized, low fat bran muffin and a skim latte, munching on just a little plate of no-fat red grapes. Now, check out the nutrition facts below, and picture that person's blood sugar two hours later! On the surface, a smoothie could be a good thing. Put some fruit and yogurt together and blend it up -- what could be so wrong with that? And there are some relatively good, lower carb smoothie recipes out there, but the vast majority contain hu Continue reading >>

Easy Swaps To Cut Carbs

Easy Swaps To Cut Carbs

People with diabetes can still eat desserts, bagels, and pizza. But it helps to know a few simple swaps that can save you up to 50 grams of carb! People with diabetes can still eat desserts, bagels, and pizza. But it helps to know a few simple swaps that can save you up to 50 grams of carb! People with diabetes can still eat desserts, bagels, and pizza. But it helps to know a few simple swaps that can save you up to 50 grams of carb! People with diabetes can still eat desserts, bagels, and pizza. But it helps to know a few simple swaps that can save you up to 50 grams of carb! People with diabetes can still eat desserts, bagels, and pizza. But it helps to know a few simple swaps that can save you up to 50 grams of carb! Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. White Bread Refined starches — white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour — act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because they’re richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so it’s still important to limit portions — stick with ½ to ¾ cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

Breakfast Bagel Melt

Breakfast Bagel Melt

1 tablespoon thick and chunky salsa (optional) In a small bowl, whisk together egg substitute, milk, salt, and pepper; set aside. Coat a small nonstick skillet with cooking spray and warm over medium-low heat. Add egg mixture and scramble, stirring frequently, until the egg is firm. Meanwhile, lightly toast bagel half. Top with Canadian bacon, scrambled egg, salsa, and cheese. Warm in a toaster oven, or in a full-size oven 5 inches from the heating element, until the cheese is melted. Serve right away. Calories: 252 calories, Carbohydrates: 31 g, Protein: 23 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Sodium: 1,320 mg*, Fiber: 4 g Exchanges per serving: 2 starch, 2 1/2 very lean meat. Carbohydrate choices: 2. *This recipe may not be suitable for people who need to limit their sodium intake. This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Bagel Hell

Bagel Hell

What is it about that gooey bready goodness that draws us in? Comfort foods that are so tempting, only to make you feel like a dead weight afterward. Bagels, pizza and doughnuts, are the three ultimate Satan foods for people with diabetes. It’s as if that cute little chunky bagel or cheese-dripping pizza coos and smiles at me before I put it in my mouth and then it takes a knife to my pancreas once inside. I do not eat these foods often, if ever at all. However, there is the occasion of a sporting event or a birthday party or breakfast at a friend’s where these food devils are the only option. Then there is the once-in-a blue moon decision to just give-in when I’m standing in line at Panera on a Saturday morning and I’m torn between the cheese soufflé or the Asiago bagel with horns sticking out of its head. People with diabetes are in a constant battle with these types of foods. We have tried everything: We don’t eat the crust on the pizza, we hollow out the bagel with a plastic knife, and we even just eat the frosting off the doughnut. But in the end, they almost always win. Not in hour one, not even in hour two, but more towards the third hour after consuming one of these big bullies we see the spike on our blood glucose meter. After it’s all said and done, you’re on the floor, knocked down by the doughy punch to the gut. What does it, and how can this cycle be stopped once and for all? If an average person eats 2000 calories a day (which does not include every shape and size, especially for women), you should be consuming between 50-60% of your calories from carbohydrates (which equals about 250 g of carbs total). For someone with diabetes, they should aim for the lower end, and even try to consume less than 50% from carbs, so about 600-800 cals or 150 Continue reading >>

Beware Of Bagels

Beware Of Bagels

If you told me to pick one thing to eat every day, three meals a day, forever, I would probably choose a bagel with cream cheese (assuming I didn’t have to factor in diabetes). Before diabetes, bagels were one of my staples. And while I don’t have a hard time avoiding carbs in general, if there are bagels in the room, the best thing for me to do is get away since bagels are about as high in carb as it gets. In fact, one bagel can have as many carbs as four slices of bread. A whole wheat Bruegger’s bagel has 61 grams of carb. A Dunkin Donuts multigrain bagel has 65 grams of carb and contains high fructose corn syrup! A whole grain bagel at Panera Bread has 67 grams of carb. (Apparently that myth about all the carbs falling out through the hole in the middle just isn’t true.) If you’re going to have a sandwich, carb-wise, a bagel isn’t your best choice. Unless you do as my grandmother (who was always on a diet) used to do: cut the bagel in half, dig out the delicious doughy middle and just eat the shell. Continue reading >>

A Bagel Just As Bad As A Doughnut?

A Bagel Just As Bad As A Doughnut?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am pretty new to all this, and am currently pre-diabetic. My friend and co-worker is type 2 and taking insulin and metformin. She is always saying that a bagel in the morning is as bad for your sugar as a doughnut. How can that be? I will leave it to the others to give the well versed scientific explanation, but it boils down to what's in the food, in this case, the carbohydrates. I don't know what type or brand of donuts/bagels you are having, but as an example: 1 original glazed Krispy Kreme donut - approx. 22 grams of carbs 1 plain Noah's bagal - approx. 71 grams of carbs Now I know that a bagal is a little larger and has more mass than a donut, but it's the carb grams that will git ya, not necessarily the sugar grams. So if you are just starting out (and we ALL were just starting out at one point), learn a technique called "carb counting". There are many books or a dietitian can give you the low down. Or, keep asking questions here and you will get the hang of it. Heck, if I got the hang of it, ANYONE can! I am pretty new to all this, and am currently pre-diabetic. My friend and co-worker is type 2 and taking insulin and metformin. She is always saying that a bagel in the morning is as bad for your sugar as a doughnut. How can that be? Yep, it was a sad day in my life when I found out this TRUTH. My favorite bagels tend to run 90 to 100+ carbs. But Since I'm T 1.5 and use insulin, I allow myself to have one once in a while. I just make sure I cover the carbs properly. Alot of people don't realize that with foods. My brother and I are both type ones and we were in the store the other day Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates & Blood Sugar Control For People With Diabetes

Carbohydrates & Blood Sugar Control For People With Diabetes

Contrary to popular thinking, people with diabetes can enjoy moderate amounts of carbohydrates in their diets. The emphasis is on carbohydrate control NOT carbohydrate avoidance. Actually, carbohydrates are the body's preferred energy source, and roughly half of your daily calorie intake should come from carbohydrate foods. Carbohydrates are the starches and sugars in food. They are found in grains, starchy vegetables, fruit, milk, and sweets. What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate counting is a meal planning approach that evenly distributes your carbohydrate calories throughout your day by counting out the right amount of carbohydrate foods for each meal and snack. The emphasis with carbohydrate counting is on how much carbohydrate you eat at any one time, NOT on which type of carbohydrate you choose. Stay away from fad diets that restrict the amount of carbohydrates you can eat. What about sugar? Research has shown that sugar does not raise blood sugar levels any more than starches do. This means you can eat sugary foods (cookies, cakes, pies, and candy) as long as you count them as part of your total carbohydrate intake. Keep in mind that foods high in sugar are often high in fat and calories, and if eaten in excess might elevate sugar and triglyceride levels, and can lead to weight gain. A sugar substitute is a sweetener that is used in place of sugar. The sugar substitutes approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are aspartame, saccharin, acesulfame potassium, sucralose, and neotame. All can be safely consumed in moderation. Sugar substitutes do not need to be counted in your meal plan. If they are used as a sweetener in food that contains few calories and no other carbohydrate (such as sugar-free soft drinks or sugar-free gelatin), that food is cons Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid For Good Blood Sugar Control

10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid For Good Blood Sugar Control

These ten diabetic foods to avoid are your enemies if you are trying to control blood sugar. That is because of insulin resistance in a type 2 diabetic and the insulin impairment in a type 1 diabetic. The foods listed here cause huge spikes in insulin, so your pancreas has to respond quickly. But diabetics have impaired insulin response. We need to stay away from those foods that are easily digested and release glucose in a flood. Of course, table sugar causes a blood sugar spike. Sugar in all its forms tops the list of diabetic foods to avoid. All type 1 and type 2 diabetic have been told this. The problem lies in the other things, foods that act like sugar when they hit our stomach and start being digested. Here are the ten worst of them. White pasta is made from refined flour, one of a diabetic's worst enemies. That makes it one of the top diabetic foods to avoid. White flour has every bit of fiber and vitamins stripped away, leaving only simple carbohydrate, which is one step away from simple sugar. It is in nearly all processed foods in some form, and in your digestive system it becomes pure glucose very fast. White rice has been polished, a refining process that removes the outer parts where fiber and vitamins are found. All that is left is the endosperm, which is also a simple carbohydrate. Like white flour it turns to glucose very fast. Blood sugar spikes, insulin is pumped out to meet it, and very soon you have a sugar low and feel hungry again. If you are fighting obesity and diabetes, white rice and white pasta are bound to make your battle harder. Does that mean no pasta or rice in your diet? No, it means you look for alternatives. Two great ones are brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Both are available at your grocery store next to the white versions. They a Continue reading >>

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

Certain foods can send your blood sugar level on a roller coaster, with insulin rushing to keep up. The good news is, while there are some surprises, most of these foods fall under the same category: processed food, such as white flour and sugar. "Refined flours and sugar cause huge spikes in insulin and get absorbed quickly, which causes problems," says Mark Hyman,… Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

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